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Excellent determination and persistence. Glad it's coming together finally. Well done!
 

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Discussion Starter #43 (Edited)
Sorry for dragging this out fellas but just before New Year’s Eve, after back flushing the oil pump pick-up screen via the EOP port I flushed the engine as I indicated back on 12/27/2019 by rapidly pouring a gallon of diesel into the engine oil filler hole to achieve what I thought would be a thorough sump flush. I cleaned the collection reservoir prior to each flush in order to gauge the effectiveness of the purges. I did this 5 times but each time debris continued to come out. I told my son that that was probably good enough and I could always take the engine back apart after a year and examine the filter screen. Then my son reminded me of a lesson I taught him that my father taught me: “If you have enough time to do the job over again, you had enough time to do it right the first time.”

So the screen itself was relatively clean, but where was this persistent debris coming from, and why wasn’t the rapid flush working? Going back into the engine with the borescope I discovered 2 locations on both sides of the main engine oil sump (4 total) that were not washing out because Honda designed the rear engine sump wall with a small hole similar to the one located behind the gear shift linkage cover on the front of the engine. The flow was (1) choked by this small rear hole and (2) the two raised ribs on the sump floor on both sides of the engine substantially deflected the flow from the 4 accumulation locations. I tried using the 12 ounce Sea Foam spray but it wasn’t effective. So I went back to my original plan to use my modified 1 gallon pump up garden sprayer incorporating a side firing spray suggested by J K McDonald back on November 10, 2019. Of the 3 brass tubes (12" long by 3/32” 5/32” and 1/8”) purchased from Hobby Lobby (SKU # 151910, $3.99) I used the 5/32” diameter tube. I sealed one end with a small drop of solder. I then used a hack saw blade to cut about a 1/8” opening into the side of the tube. On the other end, the soft brass was easily flared allowing me to create an effective leak free tubing to spray wand interface. I believe putting a 30 degree bend about 8” from the end of the tube allowed me to direct the high pressure stream in any direction (up, down, left, right) throughout the main oil sump without needing my borescope as I did with the Sea Foam red straw. Being able to discharge a gallon of cleaning fluid in 2 minutes should have done the trick.

Over 2 days I flushed debris with each gallon of diesel. As in my early oil filler hole flush, the initial effluent had magnetic debris (probably from the initial engine break in) that was cleared after the first flush of both the rear engine oil sump and main oil sump. By about the 15th gallon of diesel, the effluent finally was clear of debris. Unfortunately 5 days ago I was incapacitated by the flu and am just now getting back to working the bike. If I’m feeling up to it, tomorrow I’ll verify I eliminated the 4 pockets of debris that I identified, verify no debris was displaced to higher surfaces, and see how well the high pressure diesel flow cleaned the remaining oil pump pick-up screen debris that wasn’t dislodged by the Sea Foam’s 14” red plastic straw.
 

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I sure hope it did the trick for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
Mission Accomplished

Done. My bike is fully restored. I successfully cleaned all residual contamination using my 1 gallon garden sprayer using diesel. Borescope examination verified all prior contamination pockets were purged. I took my bike for a 10 mile ride and everything works per Honda specification.

Tomorrow I'll get insurance, a Texas state safety inspection and my Texas 2020 registration. Then I'll go on a 300 mile trip, change the oil & filter for the 8th time since beginning restoration. After I put another 3000 miles on the bike I'll I'll send an oil sample to Blackstone-labs.com to do their standard $28 oil analysis to verify everything is good.

Back in the saddle again!
 

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Nice work. I would say you know the inside of your motorcycle better than anyone on this forum. Congratulations on getting it running and your dogged determination to see it through.

I once owned a used car that had been in a flood. The engine ran fine but I was plagued with electrical connection issues for the life of the car. I spent many a day off tracing wire harnesses, cleaning and adding dielectric grease after cleaning connections. I'm wondering if you had any electrical issues with your motorcycle?

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
Flood Induced Electrical Problems

Oh boy did I ever have electrical problems following the flood. My bike was under water for 3 days with the battery connected.

I stated in my 10-23-2019 11:39 AM post:


"One thing I've learned from the flood is if I can't avoid submerging my vehicles in a flood, I have to disconnect their battery. I had to clean up a lot of electrical contact corrosion and had to replace a lot of electronics that were destroyed because their design required a tiny 'keep alive' current while their ignition switch was in the off position. None of the Goldwing's un-powered electronics were damaged except for the fuse box that had to be disassembled and cleaned, the starter solenoid & reverse solenoid were corroded and replaced, the alternator failed and was replaced, the radio and its amplifier failed and were replaced. Unfortunately I had to replace the head lights too because they filled up with water eating up the aluminized mirror surfaces. Replacement head light housings represented half of my repair cost. After doing all that restoration I successfully started the engine on the first try but the clutch wouldn't disengage. After eliminating the clutch master & slave cylinders as the cause I realized I had to disassemble the clutch. That was pretty involved requiring another 2 weeks but not too difficult. All replacement parts except the radio & amplifier were new OEM parts."​

I had only 1 more thing to fix electrically. I had to figure out why my key FOB wasn't locking/unlocking the trunk, opening the trunk lid, and blowing the horn when I use the locator feature. Things clicked when I push the key FOB so I thought it'd be a simple relay fix, connector cleaning, or simply reprogramming the FOB to the bike. The Honda Electrical Trouble Shooting Manual made restoration easy. Initial testing identified that the trunk's electro-mechanical locking/unlocking/lid release mechanism (installed in the rear or the trunk with the lock/unlock key cylinder) was an issue. I removed it from the trunk, cleaned it, and found that its two 12 volt motors were locked. Fortunately Honda built the assembly allowing disassembly down to the motors themselves by removing only 5 self tapping screws encasing each motor. I was able to clean, lubricate and free the locked motor armatures to restore full functionality. Reprogramming each key FOB restored the horn call function. An interesting note is that even though the electronic control unit for the release mechanism had battery voltage applied to it while the bike was completely submerged; the electronic control unit was located in an air bubble formed by the top of the trunk. That air bubble prevented destruction of the electronic control unit (P/N 38380-MCA-A41) and saved me $92.48.

I estimate the total parts cost using only OEM parts and special tool costs is just under $2K. That plus the cost of taking my bike to a Honda service center would have exceeded its book value. If I hadn't taken immediate preservation steps following the flood to protect the engine I don't think I could have ever restored the bike. The only feasible way to restore it was to do it myself paying close attention to restoring all Honda OEM specifications. I trust my bike now more than when I purchased it as the 4th owner since I now know everything is clean & works as it should.

I even rebuilt the front forks that had developed a seal leak. The forks really stumped me when I first took them apart since they had different parts in them than spec. One of the prior owners had installed a "Race Tech Honda GL 1800 Gold Valve Cartridge Emulator" that significantly reduced the typical nose dive when the front brake is applied. I purchased new front wheel bearings but probably wont install them for another 10K miles.

I've proved wrong Honda Powersport's assertion that the only way to clean the oil pick-up screen is by removing the engine and splitting the engine case. I suspect every Goldwing oil pick-up screen has accumulated debris from normal parts wear, especially the clutch pads. If the engine design was changed to relocate the oil drain plug into the gear shift linkage cover directly in front of the forward oil sump drain port, cleaning could be accomplished without any significant disassembly.
 
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