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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Now that there are finally a couple of parking lots here that have been cleared of gravel and sand, I've been out doing a little PLP on the wing and have really noticed that I'm finding slow sharp left turns quite a bit easier than turning right. I don't get it. I'm right handed, but can't figure out why that would have any bearing on it.

Anyone else notice this?

I haven't quite gotten to where I'm scraping the pegs but I'm getting close. I have the Ride Like a Pro DVD but haven't watched it since last year and don't remember them mentioning turning one way being easier than the other. I'll have to put it on and watch it again.

One thing that crossed my mind is that with the bike leaned way over to the right, the throttle arm is more bent - maybe a little cramped? Maybe that gives me the uneasy feeling (?) - I don't know. Or maybe that the clutch arm is more extended when leaned right?

Anyway, I just find it odd why one way would be so much more difficult for me than the other and thought I'd see if any of you fine folks had any thoughts on it.
 

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+1 ....KC...I have a more difficult time in tight right turns. I understand, that its very common for folks to favor one side over another. My cousin is great with right hand and struggles with left hand. Not sure for the reason. I just know the comfort level changes for me.....Funny thing though..All of my previous drops have been on the left hand side. Maybe I need to drop it on the right hand side....:rolleyes::confused:
 

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It may have something to do with left and right handed people. I am left handed and prefer right turns with bikes and snowmobiles while my right handed friends all prefer left turns. JUST A SUGGESTION
 

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It may have something to do with left and right handed people. I am left handed and prefer right turns with bikes and snowmobiles while my right handed friends all prefer left turns. JUST A SUGGESTION
You may be right.....I am right handed and prefer to turn left. You may be on to something:)
 

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I was thinking about the question and came up with this: When coming to a stop, it is typical to put down your left foot and lean slightly left. This leaves your right foot to hold the brake while you use your right hand to get the throttle ready to take off. Thus you are vulnerable to the bike going down on the right. Thus when riding leaning right may be a bit more of a worry? Makes sense to me.
 

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I was thinking about the question and came up with this: When coming to a stop, it is typical to put down your left foot and lean slightly left. This leaves your right foot to hold the brake while you use your right hand to get the throttle ready to take off. Thus you are vulnerable to the bike going down on the right. Thus when riding leaning right may be a bit more of a worry? Makes sense to me.
Not that this has anything to do with leaning, but I thought MSF decided that riders of touring motorcycles should place both feet down at stops in order to square the weight?:confused:
 

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My thought is that most right turns are sharper than left turns. IE.. At a stop light and then turn right. Seems like we feel there is more of a "sweeping" turn to the left and an urge to turn the handlebars when turning right. JMHO...
 

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Turning right from the right lane has a tighter turning radius than left turns for those who drive/ride on the right side of the road.
 

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I'll add that , like a car, the turning radius of the wheel is greater turning left than turning right. My 03 cents worth. Does a motorcycle have the same steering turn travel both left and right ? Easy to check.
 

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Not that this has anything to do with leaning, but I thought MSF decided that riders of touring motorcycles should place both feet down at stops in order to square the weight?:confused:
May be the way it is taught, but in real life, at least for me, any stop that isn't dead flat requires a brake to hold the bike. If I have my right hand on the brake, it is much harder to control the throttle. So what I do in those instances, stop with the hand brake (not always possible, for instance on gravel?) and put both feet down, get settled, take up right foot, with right hand holding brake till right foot is on brake, then get ready to take off while leaning slightly left.

About tighter right turns, that is true, but the OP was practicing in a parking lot, and I took it that he was doing equal right and left turns (same space available) and found right harder to do than left.

When I do a tight turn on the street, I slightly turn the bars the way I want to go, then take off. Tightens up the turn once you get used to it.
 

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When I'm making the same size slow speed turns and making them tighter in either direction the tighter to the right for me the more awkward the wrist position gets and operating the throttle gets more difficult.
Again this is at slow speed where you are actually steering to the right and the right grip comes in closer and closer, operating the throttle gets really awkward for me.
If that make sense
 

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When I'm making the same size slow speed turns and making them tighter in either direction the tighter to the right for me the more awkward the wrist position gets and operating the throttle gets more difficult.
Again this is at slow speed where you are actually steering to the right and the right grip comes in closer and closer, operating the throttle gets really awkward for me.
If that make sense
Makes sense to me. It has to do with the throttle and wrist position ? I'll check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not that this has anything to do with leaning, but I thought MSF decided that riders of touring motorcycles should place both feet down at stops in order to square the weight?:confused:
I'd like to know if that's what's taught. Certainly it's what I do a lot of the time on the Wing. On my Vulcan I'd say I probably stop one-footed about 85% of the time, but on the Wing I probably stop two footed at least half the time.

About tighter right turns, that is true, but the OP was practicing in a parking lot, and I took it that he was doing equal right and left turns (same space available) and found right harder to do than left.

When I do a tight turn on the street, I slightly turn the bars the way I want to go, then take off. Tightens up the turn once you get used to it.
Yes, in a parking lot trying to make tighter and tighter turns in both directions.

I've seen some good video's (Capt Crash particularly) showing the sharp turn from a stop technique you mention -turning the bars in the direction of the turn before taking off. Add in a bit of a lean beforehand and the corner can be pretty darn tight.

When I'm making the same size slow speed turns and making them tighter in either direction the tighter to the right for me the more awkward the wrist position gets and operating the throttle gets more difficult.
Again this is at slow speed where you are actually steering to the right and the right grip comes in closer and closer, operating the throttle gets really awkward for me.
If that make sense
That's where I'm leaning too (pun intented) - the orientation of the throttle hand/wrist, but I'm not certain. It seems like the 'uneasy feeling' that's telling me it's going to be difficult is in the moment even before the turn, but that may well just be anticipating what I already believe is going to be awkward.

If any more lefties are out there I'd still be curious which turn you find most awkward.

Oh well, I guess no matter the cause, the answer is practice, practice, practice.
 

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Rotation

When asked that same question in an MSF class I tell them It's because you are turning opposite of the Earths rotation and if they were to go to the Southern hemisphere they would feel uncomfortable making left turns:D

Total BS, but it makes them think about it.
 

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Multiple factors I think. #1 would be side dominance factor...r vs l handed and eye dominance(?). Then there's the throttle hand thing too. Never thought about the 'earth's rotational factor' but I'm no physicist so. We drive on the left side of a vehicle so rh turns are more blind than lh side too so...conditioned reflex syndrom? I notice my lh turns are more relaxed as well (non the Wing, but not the rocket) so weight and heft? Things that make you go hmmmmmm.:confused:
 

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I too do better in left hand turns. Maybe its because I used to race dirt cars, and I am used to turning left. ;-)
 

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I'm left handed, left eyed, and left footed and find tight left turns easier than tight rights.
 

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Hi all, this turning issue is not just a issue for motorcycles the same could be said for bicycles, roller skates, and even running. I think this comes from the constant nagging and complaining that we are exposed to from women. over time the side of our brains that is responsible for dealing with these mental intrusions gets over loaded and short circuited, thus turning this part of our finely tuned brain into a vast void of scar tissue and mush.:D
 
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