Honda Goldwing Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to look over a 1990 GL1500 tomorrow afternoon with 28K on her and no NOTHING about the 6cyl wings. Is there anything that I need to be aware of or check, other than the normal stuff. Is there any problems with that year that I need to know about?

Thanks for any help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
First thing..as most here will tell you, TIMING BELTS! If you can't find out exactly when..or if they were done..then that is top of the list IMHO.
The O.E.M. alternators are a weak spot. Many have gone to the Compufire 90 amp w/ gel battery. Not cheap,but, they kick out 50 more amps than stock. Accessories such as lights, heated clothing etc are all possible if you go that route. I'm sure there are other things to look at..more knowledgeable people will chime in soon.:)
BTW, the first couple of yrs for the 1500's had an off idle hesitation problem, you can solve that with an aftermarket timing or trigger wheel; They advance the timing by 4 deg and make that issue go away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
I would not consider any bike that is 22 years old as a primary "ride" unless there has been recent, documented, replacement of the parts that are degraded simply from time exposure such as wiring, hoses, tires, ec.
I would check it over good for corrosion "underneath".
28K is an average of just over 1K/yr!!!!!!!! Or how many years has/was it "parked" and how was it prepped for that?
If you do not have much knowledge of these areas and more-do yourself a big favor and find a near by dealer that will do a thorough inspection and ask the seller to allow this and of course you pay for it. This may be more difficult than you think as the amount of dealers that refuse to allow bikes more than 10 years old in their "shop" is ever increasing! Maybe there is a good "indy" shop close by.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,437 Posts
Chuck here is a link with some good info on it.

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwinghistory.htm

Several things at play here.

#1 You have to work with the budget you have for the purchase.This can sometimes get lost to others that have the newer bikes.
#2 As dawg said it is 22yrs old & that is low mileage. There is a theshold that happens with any motorized vehicle where low mileage isn't necessarily a good thing. However it still may not be a bad thing either if the bike has been maintained. See if owner has kept records of service.
#3 Do you have the ability to do some work on the bike. If so than a lot of that concern can go away.
#4 Things like timing belts (should be changed around 60k-80k), vacuum hoses, fuel lines, etc. can be brittle due to the age so that's why the guys mentioned it.
#5 I wouldn't let the alternator thing bother you too much unless you were going to load the bike up with hideous lights & such. Yes they were weak however if you are running stock it won't be an issue. There are also alot of used ones out there if it fails,the Compufire setup with Battery you can get at Wingstuff for $470.00 & if you join the VIP it will take off probably the cost of the Membership.Then you can buy other stuff at discounts.
#6 I think the stumbling issue was taken care of by that year but can be as BR said with the trigger wheel.
#7 You should just ask the normal questions you would if buying anything & be aware that you are buying a 20+ year old motorcycle. You will have work to do to it I'm sure but if the bike sings the "Ride Me" song to you & it fits your Budget than I wish you all the best.

Good Luck & keep us informed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,405 Posts
I did this very thing last summer, bought a 95. All the above is good advice but it's hard to pin down EVERYTHING.

I would look at it from a different perspective.

If you desire to ride it and depend on it right away,
Keep $1000 for after the purchase of the bike for all things rubber and fluids if you are going to do the work yourself. Double it if you are having work done. (don't let emotion get ahead of you, if you can't come to a price on the bike that eats into this $1000/2000, walk away. Your going to spend it.)

If you want a project, have time to let it sit some of the time, then this 1000 bucks isn't so important. Unless the owner has proof of a recent timing belt change, change them no matter what and right away. It's not worth losing the engine over 65 bucks. And you can't look at them to know if they are good. Almost everyone's look good no matter how old.

Look at the purchase price and realize that there will be things to do as you come across them. Mine was rideable but there were hidden issues.


If it is what you want and you feel the price is right, go for it. As for mine, I would not hesititate to go across the country in it now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,437 Posts
As for mine, I would not hesititate to go across the country in it now.
Very nice summation L2R. I did just that & would do it again if I could.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Look in the gas tank for signs of rust. If rusty, do you know how to repair it? If not, be cautious. How was it stored. Did they use fuel stabilizer? That will help but if it has been stored for over two years, the fuel is still probably bad which means the carbs will be gummed up and may require rebuilding. Not impossible tasks but definately time consuming. Sometimes Seafoam will clear that up for you. If you are like me and love to work with your hands, this is just one more challenge to take on. The sound once you get her running will make you drool:) Of course, you will need to replace the oil and filter, others will suggest changing all fluids which is not a bad idea unless the owner can show that all of this has recently been done. If they can start it for you, listen near the tail pipes for any missing. If it won't start, price should be lowered in fairness to you because you will spend money to get it running. All old gas will need to be drained and fresh put in. Sometimes that is all it needs to fire up. The battery may or may not be shot. If you do decide to buy it, plan on a new battery soon. All the other suggestions given here are great ideas. Don't rule it out because of age. The Goldwing has a great history of lasting many years if properly maintained. Maintaining means spending money to keep her in great shape. If you fit that bill, good luck.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well I never got to see the 1500, the guy never got back to me. My search has ended for a bike though. I will continue to be "on the dark side" though. I found a smokin deal on an 89 HD Road King and went to see it last night. Ended up buying it, so I will be an HD guy for awhile longer.

Thanks for the info and the warm welcomes........see ya in the wind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
Well I never got to see the 1500, the guy never got back to me. My search has ended for a bike though. I will continue to be "on the dark side" though. I found a smokin deal on an 89 HD Road King and went to see it last night. Ended up buying it, so I will be an HD guy for awhile longer.

Thanks for the info and the warm welcomes........see ya in the wind.
I'm sure you will be very happy on that RK.

I had a sort of opposite experience buying my GW trike. I was hot for it and the seller was 200+mi away, which meant I had to travel to see a bike I didn't know I'd buy. And he had 3 or 4 "buyers" who had expressed interest in the bike before I did.

So, I sweated that out all week only for him to tell me late on a Friday eve to come out on Saturday. The last time a guy told me that, I drove 75mins to see a 90's HD EG and upon arriving, was told "Sorry, but the bike just sold not 5 minutes ago". Thankfully, the guy I was dealing with this time was much more of a straight shooter.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top