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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I get tired of HD riders being unsociable. Most of the time crotch rocket riders will wave. Very seldom will a wing rider not wave. But HD riders seem to think they are just too cool. Funny if they are alone the will wave, but more than a couple together and like they don't want there buddies to see them be sociable to a winger. I was unsure if I was gonna upgrade to a HD, but I now believe I'm just gonna look for a newer wing. The Goldwing just fits the wife and me better, more comfy. and i just like the ppl better, they seem to be just a better class of rider. Don't get me wrong i'm sure not all HDers are that way, the way i see it, i got a motor and two wheels (no offence to you trikers) and i'm riding
 

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You want a myriad of "ignorer's", get a trike. Everybody waved when I rode Harley's. Many Harley Hoppers wouldn't return a wave when I got my Wing. Now there are riders of all brands ignoring my waves, since I am on "3".
Don't let it bother you any more. The non-responders are showing their ignorance!
 

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Personally I do not get the whole wave concept,When I am out riding well I am riding.
When I am on my motorcycle it is to clear my head from a long week at work or to get to work either way I have no interest in waving to a complete stranger, just because they managed to toss a leg over a bike doesn't mean that we have some sort of weird obligatory relationship.
The people that you are waving to could be anything from a priest to a Axe murderer,or worse a person like Barry Madeoff. To say that Wingers are a better class of people is just wrong. To not buy a Harley you wanted based on this idea is border line pathetic. Ride what you like and can afford but don't base it on other people or their social habits.

I used the word Pathetic, but I meant no harm or insult I think I should have used something like sad or misguided. I in no way meant this to be mean spirited. I am sorry if this post seems judgemental or harsh but I am one of those Unsocialable HD riders on a Goldwing due to health reasons.
 

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why is it such a big deal because another rider didn't wave? if i feel like waving today i will and for the most part i do wave. there are only about five wings in my area that are the same color as mine so most bikers that wave to me i actually know. being in a club and having to wear the pirite outfit means i know a whole lot of guys in the area on bikes
 

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http://www.cyclefish.com/forum/Bike...ave-History-and-Proper-Etiquette-38795-1.html :
To wave or not to wave. That is not the question. Said topic has been dealt with elsewhere, ad nauseam. Suffice it to say that the choice is entirely yours: Wave first, wave back or don’t wave at all. However, if you do decide to wave, then the Waving Code that all Real Bikers share needs to be committed to memory and implemented correctly.
The historical origin of the wave is attributed to armored knights on horseback. When approached by another knight bearing the same coat of arms, both knights would raise their helmets’ visors to reveal their identities to each other. When knights were not in armor, the lifting of the visor was transformed into a salute, employing a similar motion of the arm and hand.
In the early days of motorcycling, two-wheeled warriors of the open road began greeting each other in passing with a knight-like salute. Nowadays, according to experts on waving protocol, the waves exchanged by bikers are determined by the kinds of bikes they are riding. The major categories are sport-bikes, metric cruising/touring bikes, and genuine Harley-Davidsons. Anything else with a motor and two wheels is considered to be just a motor-bike.
Sport-bikes, be they naked or faired, are designed to be pushed to scary limits by competent pilots of the non-squidly persuasion. Due to their awesome power and handling, they deserve special recognition with a specific salute. Don’t expect a sportbike pilot to remove hand from grip when their bike is cranked over in a turn. While showering sparks onto pavement, the best riders may actually manage a subtle lifting of the left index finger. Consequently, waving at sportbikes by wiggling your index finger is considered the proper salute. If you are riding an inline-four and aren’t preoccupied with scraping noises emanating from your footpeg, you may want to wave by raising all four fingers while leaving your left thumb curled under the grip. Ducati riders may similarly modify the standard sportbike salute, using two fingers to symbolize their twins.
There are a couple of other hand gestures shared by sportbike riders that are worth mentioning. If you have recently eluded a speed trap on your crotch-rocket and encounter oncoming sportbike riders, pat the top of your helmet to let them know there’s fuzz up ahead. On the other hand, if the section of highway you’ve just burned up is not infested with gun-toting kill-joys trying to enforce speed limits meant for cagers, you may want to signal with a thumbs-up, just to let the other bikers know that they, too, can go for it.
Japanese metric cruisers and baggers, while undeniably offering the best bang for the buck in the forward-foot-control genre, just don’t have enough innate character to garner the respect of bikers whose loyalties lie elsewhere. While heavily customized versions may receive admiration at bike shows, their riders tend to feel like Rodney Dangerfield when on the road. If you don’t ride rice and want to avoid the appearance of snobbery, you may acknowledge these Oriental economic miracles by raising your left hand vertically, keeping your elbow close to your side so as not to imitate a right-turn hand signal. Keeping your fingers curled, touch your left thumb to your index finger as if pinching a penny. If you are riding a metric cruiser, open your left hand while maintaining thumb to forefinger contact, and form the universally recognized sign for “O.K., Dude!”
The venerable Harley-Davidson is the only motorcycle worthy of the V-Twin salute. A “V for Victory” or “Peace, Brother” symbol is formed with the index and middle fingers, and delivered with a slow extension of the left arm, downward at a 45-degree angle. If you own a Harley and have acquired the all-too-common “Harleyer than Thou” attitude towards other coats of arms, upon discovering that the approaching bike is actually a Japanese imposter you can simply retract your index finger. Depending upon the extent of your air-cooled bigotry, you may want to give an approaching V-Rod rider the same one-finger salute. Unless, of course, you are also riding a V-Rod, in which case a shoulder shrug is probably sufficient.
Should you encounter an off-brand American cruiser, a chopper, a Euro-bike that is not of the sporting variety, or a Japanese model other than cruiser, bagger or sportbike, a quasi-salute is optional. This can be accomplished with a brief opening of your left hand, just above the grip. However, if you happen to be riding the very same kind of motorcycle, then by all means feel free to make a fool of yourself by gesticulating wildly.
When it comes to waving etiquette, there remain several murky areas still being hotly debated. For example, should passengers wave to other passengers, thereby sharing pillion empathy? If you are of the waving persuasion, should you greet everyone coming the other way on your poker run? If there is a large group of oncoming riders, and their motorcycles represent a mixed bag, should you give the entire group one continuous, generic wave, or should you greet each rider individually with a wave that is politically correct for their specific mount? If you can accomplish the latter at 50 miles per hour, you can probably count cards in Vegas.
There is one more thing that needs to be said here. While it is perfectly acceptable for bikers to return in kind the waves of pedestrians, be they inquisitive children or envious adults, Real Bikers never wave back at grown-ups on bicycles, mopeds or motor-scooters. If you’ll feel guilt-ridden for not being oh-so polite, then perhaps a simple nod of the head in recognition of their existence would ease your conscience. Just hope that your riding buddies don’t notice!
Why They Don’t Wave Back
Every once in a while, somebody starts whining about Harley riders not waving back. Before those whiners dismiss all Harley riders as mean-spirited, they should consider that there are probably very good reasons why their waves are not being returned….
Top Ten Reasons Why Harley Riders Don’t Wave Back
1 – They’re afraid it will invalidate their factory warranty.
2 – Leather and studs make it too hard to raise their arm.
3 – They refuse to wave to anyone whose bike is already paid for.
4 – They won’t let go of handlebars because they might vibrate off.
5 – The rushing wind could blow the scabs off their new tattoos.
6 – They’re angry over the second mortgage needed to pay for the new Harley.
7 – They just discovered the fine print in their owner’s manual revealing that The Motor Company is partially owned by rice-burner manufacturers.
8 – They can’t tell if other riders are actually waving or just reaching up to cover their ears, like everyone else.
9 – If they wave back, they risk being impaled on their spiked helmet.
10 – They’re upset that after spending $30,000, they still don’t own a bike that’s as comfortable as a Goldwing.
To be totally fair, let it be noted that sometimes Goldwing riders don’t wave back, either. Again, to facilitate a better understanding….
Top Ten Reasons Why Goldwing Riders Don’t Wave Back
1 – They aren’t sure whether the other rider is waving or making an obscene gesture.
2 – They risk getting frostbite if they take their hand off the heated grip.
3 – They have arthritis and it is difficult to raise their arm.
4 – The reflection from the etched windshield was momentarily blinding.
5 – The on-board espresso machine had just finished.
6 – They were asleep when other rider waved.
7 – They were involved in a three-way conference call with their stock broker and accessories dealer.
8 – They were distracted by an oddly shaped blip on their radar screen.
9 – They were simultaneously adjusting the air suspension, seat height, programmable CD player, seat temperature and satellite navigation system.
10 – They couldn’t find the “auto wave-back” button on their dashboard.
 

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Wow someone has way too much time on their hands.:D
 

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Wow, with all those different waves to remember, I think I'll just keep my hand on the grip!


:D
 

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http://www.cyclefish.com/forum/Bike...ave-History-and-Proper-Etiquette-38795-1.html :
To wave or not to wave. That is not the question. Said topic has been dealt with elsewhere, ad nauseam. Suffice it to say that the choice is entirely yours: Wave first, wave back or don’t wave at all. However, if you do decide to wave, then the Waving Code that all Real Bikers share needs to be committed to memory and implemented correctly.
The historical origin of the wave is attributed to armored knights on horseback. When approached by another knight bearing the same coat of arms, both knights would raise their helmets’ visors to reveal their identities to each other. When knights were not in armor, the lifting of the visor was transformed into a salute, employing a similar motion of the arm and hand.
In the early days of motorcycling, two-wheeled warriors of the open road began greeting each other in passing with a knight-like salute. Nowadays, according to experts on waving protocol, the waves exchanged by bikers are determined by the kinds of bikes they are riding. The major categories are sport-bikes, metric cruising/touring bikes, and genuine Harley-Davidsons. Anything else with a motor and two wheels is considered to be just a motor-bike.
Sport-bikes, be they naked or faired, are designed to be pushed to scary limits by competent pilots of the non-squidly persuasion. Due to their awesome power and handling, they deserve special recognition with a specific salute. Don’t expect a sportbike pilot to remove hand from grip when their bike is cranked over in a turn. While showering sparks onto pavement, the best riders may actually manage a subtle lifting of the left index finger. Consequently, waving at sportbikes by wiggling your index finger is considered the proper salute. If you are riding an inline-four and aren’t preoccupied with scraping noises emanating from your footpeg, you may want to wave by raising all four fingers while leaving your left thumb curled under the grip. Ducati riders may similarly modify the standard sportbike salute, using two fingers to symbolize their twins.
There are a couple of other hand gestures shared by sportbike riders that are worth mentioning. If you have recently eluded a speed trap on your crotch-rocket and encounter oncoming sportbike riders, pat the top of your helmet to let them know there’s fuzz up ahead. On the other hand, if the section of highway you’ve just burned up is not infested with gun-toting kill-joys trying to enforce speed limits meant for cagers, you may want to signal with a thumbs-up, just to let the other bikers know that they, too, can go for it.
Japanese metric cruisers and baggers, while undeniably offering the best bang for the buck in the forward-foot-control genre, just don’t have enough innate character to garner the respect of bikers whose loyalties lie elsewhere. While heavily customized versions may receive admiration at bike shows, their riders tend to feel like Rodney Dangerfield when on the road. If you don’t ride rice and want to avoid the appearance of snobbery, you may acknowledge these Oriental economic miracles by raising your left hand vertically, keeping your elbow close to your side so as not to imitate a right-turn hand signal. Keeping your fingers curled, touch your left thumb to your index finger as if pinching a penny. If you are riding a metric cruiser, open your left hand while maintaining thumb to forefinger contact, and form the universally recognized sign for “O.K., Dude!”
The venerable Harley-Davidson is the only motorcycle worthy of the V-Twin salute. A “V for Victory” or “Peace, Brother” symbol is formed with the index and middle fingers, and delivered with a slow extension of the left arm, downward at a 45-degree angle. If you own a Harley and have acquired the all-too-common “Harleyer than Thou” attitude towards other coats of arms, upon discovering that the approaching bike is actually a Japanese imposter you can simply retract your index finger. Depending upon the extent of your air-cooled bigotry, you may want to give an approaching V-Rod rider the same one-finger salute. Unless, of course, you are also riding a V-Rod, in which case a shoulder shrug is probably sufficient.
Should you encounter an off-brand American cruiser, a chopper, a Euro-bike that is not of the sporting variety, or a Japanese model other than cruiser, bagger or sportbike, a quasi-salute is optional. This can be accomplished with a brief opening of your left hand, just above the grip. However, if you happen to be riding the very same kind of motorcycle, then by all means feel free to make a fool of yourself by gesticulating wildly.
When it comes to waving etiquette, there remain several murky areas still being hotly debated. For example, should passengers wave to other passengers, thereby sharing pillion empathy? If you are of the waving persuasion, should you greet everyone coming the other way on your poker run? If there is a large group of oncoming riders, and their motorcycles represent a mixed bag, should you give the entire group one continuous, generic wave, or should you greet each rider individually with a wave that is politically correct for their specific mount? If you can accomplish the latter at 50 miles per hour, you can probably count cards in Vegas.
There is one more thing that needs to be said here. While it is perfectly acceptable for bikers to return in kind the waves of pedestrians, be they inquisitive children or envious adults, Real Bikers never wave back at grown-ups on bicycles, mopeds or motor-scooters. If you’ll feel guilt-ridden for not being oh-so polite, then perhaps a simple nod of the head in recognition of their existence would ease your conscience. Just hope that your riding buddies don’t notice!
Why They Don’t Wave Back
Every once in a while, somebody starts whining about Harley riders not waving back. Before those whiners dismiss all Harley riders as mean-spirited, they should consider that there are probably very good reasons why their waves are not being returned….
Top Ten Reasons Why Harley Riders Don’t Wave Back
1 – They’re afraid it will invalidate their factory warranty.
2 – Leather and studs make it too hard to raise their arm.
3 – They refuse to wave to anyone whose bike is already paid for.
4 – They won’t let go of handlebars because they might vibrate off.
5 – The rushing wind could blow the scabs off their new tattoos.
6 – They’re angry over the second mortgage needed to pay for the new Harley.
7 – They just discovered the fine print in their owner’s manual revealing that The Motor Company is partially owned by rice-burner manufacturers.
8 – They can’t tell if other riders are actually waving or just reaching up to cover their ears, like everyone else.
9 – If they wave back, they risk being impaled on their spiked helmet.
10 – They’re upset that after spending $30,000, they still don’t own a bike that’s as comfortable as a Goldwing.
To be totally fair, let it be noted that sometimes Goldwing riders don’t wave back, either. Again, to facilitate a better understanding….
Top Ten Reasons Why Goldwing Riders Don’t Wave Back
1 – They aren’t sure whether the other rider is waving or making an obscene gesture.
2 – They risk getting frostbite if they take their hand off the heated grip.
3 – They have arthritis and it is difficult to raise their arm.
4 – The reflection from the etched windshield was momentarily blinding.
5 – The on-board espresso machine had just finished.
6 – They were asleep when other rider waved.
7 – They were involved in a three-way conference call with their stock broker and accessories dealer.
8 – They were distracted by an oddly shaped blip on their radar screen.
9 – They were simultaneously adjusting the air suspension, seat height, programmable CD player, seat temperature and satellite navigation system.
10 – They couldn’t find the “auto wave-back” button on their dashboard.
I agree with you.

That was a fun read. The two to one finger salute is the best.
 

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http://www.cyclefish.com/forum/Bike...ave-History-and-Proper-Etiquette-38795-1.html :

Top Ten Reasons Why Harley Riders Don’t Wave Back
1 – They’re afraid it will invalidate their factory warranty.
2 – Leather and studs make it too hard to raise their arm.
3 – They refuse to wave to anyone whose bike is already paid for.
4 – They won’t let go of handlebars because they might vibrate off.
5 – The rushing wind could blow the scabs off their new tattoos.
6 – They’re angry over the second mortgage needed to pay for the new Harley.
7 – They just discovered the fine print in their owner’s manual revealing that The Motor Company is partially owned by rice-burner manufacturers.
8 – They can’t tell if other riders are actually waving or just reaching up to cover their ears, like everyone else.
9 – If they wave back, they risk being impaled on their spiked helmet.
10 – They’re upset that after spending $30,000, they still don’t own a bike that’s as comfortable as a Goldwing.
To be totally fair, let it be noted that sometimes Goldwing riders don’t wave back, either. Again, to facilitate a better understanding….
Top Ten Reasons Why Goldwing Riders Don’t Wave Back
1 – They aren’t sure whether the other rider is waving or making an obscene gesture.
2 – They risk getting frostbite if they take their hand off the heated grip.
3 – They have arthritis and it is difficult to raise their arm.
4 – The reflection from the etched windshield was momentarily blinding.
5 – The on-board espresso machine had just finished.
6 – They were asleep when other rider waved.
7 – They were involved in a three-way conference call with their stock broker and accessories dealer.
8 – They were distracted by an oddly shaped blip on their radar screen.
9 – They were simultaneously adjusting the air suspension, seat height, programmable CD player, seat temperature and satellite navigation system.
10 – They couldn’t find the “auto wave-back” button on their dashboard.
Awesome. good laugh.
I have so far been an occasional waver
 

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thought everyone in California was liberal ! Maybe waving is the politically correct thing to do there .


Some of us are just trapped in California until retirement. Cannot wait to leave the cesspool.
 

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I have to agree that it's no big deal if one does or doesn't wave. I usually do but then I was raised that way. We don't have much of that kind of problem in the NW. Have even ridden with an outlaw gang for Toys for Tots one Fall. Actually nice guys, just looked rough.
 

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Personally I do not get the whole wave concept,When I am out riding well I am riding.
When I am on my motorcycle it is to clear my head from a long week at work or to get to work either way I have no interest in waving to a complete stranger, just because they managed to toss a leg over a bike doesn't mean that we have some sort of weird obligatory relationship...............
I alway felt it is because we all share the love of riding, and deal with the cage drivers, weather, and even the bug splat. I will wave to anyone on 2 or 3 wheels (mopeds to trikes) because they are sharing a passion and enjoying the freedom of the ride. It only takes a few seconds at most, and you never know when someone might be having a crappy day, and a simple acknowledgement wave is important to them. Don't wave to me, no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's really no big deal wave or not don't matter. just seams like most HD riders look down on all other riders. I guess I was raised that way also, I try to be courteous to ppl. Kinda like Promethius said ya never know that rider may just need a hug that day (sorry but a wave is all he gets). As for choosing not to buy HD that really had nothing to do with ppl. I figured out a long time back my Goldwing just fits right. That and it's paid for
 

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My husband and I both wave. I guess it's all about the camaraderie I found here and the little kid in us coming out, enjoying a new adventure of our life!! We have received waves back from all types of riders. If some don't wave that's okay too. I know sometimes we are looking around and miss a wave here and there. It's like giving a smile, it doesn't hurt anything and most of the time it makes a person feel good. A wave makes us feel like we are part of a new family, new adventure etc. So if ya'll see us out there, we accept waves!!!
Ride with the angels surrounding you.
God bless,
Angelmammaw
 

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Anyone who gets on the road on a little 50cc scooter should even get a wave, it takes a lot of courage to ride that little underpowered 2 wheeler in traffic.
 

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I usually wave and often don't get a wave in return. That is O.K. with me.

My favorite thing to do is to wave at the Motor Cops in town. We have several that do a bit of revenueing (word?) near my path home. I love to wave at them. One guy in particular will never wave at me. He weighs about the same as his bike....and I feel skinny when I see him (I'm 6'3"@285lbs.). I have not had one take offense to my waving yet---don't care if they did. It throws them for a loop every time. :)

Sometimes little kids on bikes wave. I'll even wave to them. I've even had little tikes in car seats wave...I wave too....but then they wave again, again, again...I pass those guys up fast.:)
 
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