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I am interested in riding the four corners in the Western US. I live in southern middle TN and would appreciate any input from your past experiences.

Thank you!
 

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I cannot really speak to riding a bike in the area since I was there in a cage. However it did seem like it was a nice area for a ride.

Went to the Grand Canyon two years ago and stopped at four corners on the way home to Alabama. The four corners monument is something to see.

Eric


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We have had a few members in the past do the Four Corners tour. 2 come to mind in particular. Both members are not active on the site at this point but here are the links. One was a leisurely ride with sites and stops, the other was a feat of strength and durability as it was done in 10 days.


 

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I am interested in riding the four corners in the Western US. I live in southern middle TN and would appreciate any input from your past experiences.

Thank you!
Take I40 to NM West of Santa Rosa North on 84 and then take 25 up to 160, 160 over to Four
Corners. You may want to visit Mesa Verde National Park and stay in Pagosa Springs and take a dip in their hot springs.
 

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There are two very different rides being discussed here, LOL...

One is the "Four Corners" area in the southwest, at the corners of NM, AZ, UT and CO. Might be nice this time of year.

The other is the "Four Corners of the USA" ride from Maine to Florida to Washington to California. It would not be nice in northern Maine right now!
 
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Back in the 1996 or 97 on my 92 1500, My daughter and I went to Wing Ding in Montana and into Canada and then Glacier National Park and on the way home we detoured to 4-Corners. I was kind of disappointed. Some Indian Stands selling stuff but out in the desert, you don't see much but land in 4 directions in 4 states. It was middle of July and Hot, Hot. Now, For 30 years, I've been wanting to do the Four Corners of the USA and can not get anyone interested and at the ripe old age of 73, I think time is running out and I do not want to go it alone.
 

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PawPaw, the Four Corners is on my bucket list too. I haven't been yet but some of the places I consider worth trying include;

If you are travelling there on the Go-Fast road (I-40) then you should consider a detour just before Amarillo, TX. The Palo Duro Canyon is very different from the boring road you have been on through Oklahoma and Texas. There is a State Park to visit, but TX 207 will take you down into the canyon. Nearby at Goodnight (on US 287) has the home of Charles Goodnight of the Goodnight Trail fame.

In New Mexico at Tucumcari NM 104 cuts up toward Las Vegas and has been recommended for riding. Up from there is NM 518 to Taos. The loop around US 64 – 38 - 522 is supposed to be an awesome ride. US 64 west will take you to the Four Corners.

North of that in Colorado is Mesa Verde National Park which is an interesting historic stop. North of Durango is US 550 which is a beautiful ride up into the Rocky Mountains. You can turn around at Silverton or continue on up to Montrose.

From there I would head west into Utah. Arches National Park is an awesome place to visit. If you are on I 70, be sure to cut off toward Moab at Cisco and take UT 128. John Wayne was in a couple movies along that road and stayed at a guest ranch along there. (We stayed once, but I fail to remember which one, maybe Red Cliffs Lodge.) Anyway, it’s a great road. In Utah, pick any National Park, they are all excellent.

Enjoy the ride, pick your season as it gets hot out that way. Be sure to post pictures of your adventure so the rest of us can live vicariously!
 
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From there I would head west into Utah. Arches National Park is an awesome place to visit. If you are on I 70, be sure to cut off toward Moab at Cisco and take UT 128. John Wayne was in a couple movies along that road and stayed at a guest ranch along there. (We stayed once, but I fail to remember which one, maybe Red Cliffs Lodge.) Anyway, it’s a great road. In Utah, pick any National Park, they are all excellent.

Enjoy the ride, be sure to post pictures of your adventure so the rest of us can live vicariously!
I believe you are talking about Goulding’s Lodge where John Wayne stayed while filming in the area. It is just outside of Monument Valley where John Wayne filmed the three Calvary movies. We stayed in this motel during our grand canyon trip but they will not tell you which room.

Also just north from the motel is where the scene in Forest Gump where he stops running, it was cool to see that.

I would like to ride that area on a bike, the views are impressive, especially to a southeasterner like myself.

Eric


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My wife and I were just out there in late September. Not a Wing trip, but in the car. Traveling through the Rockies in Colorado in late September can be quite a gamble weather wise, thus we took the car.

North of Monument Valley, and just up past Mexican Hat is Valley of the Gods and the Moki Dugway. Both are on gravel roads, so you may not be interested in them, but if you are okay with gravel, you will enjoy both.

Valley of the Gods is similar to Monument Valley, but on a smaller scale, and is located on BLM land rather than Navajo land. If you like to camp, you can camp for free in Valley of the Gods. Quiet, serene, and lonely, it is a different kind of camping to say the least. We stayed there one night and are planning to return in the future. Camping is first come, first served, but be careful not to set up camp in a wash. Flash floods in the area are very real and very deadly.

Just west of Valley of the Gods is the Moki Dugway, also known as Utah highway 261. The road twists and turns its way up the side of the cliff, is all gravel, and is a 10% grade in places, but the view from the top is awesome! Other members have posted about it here in the past. The road was originally built by a mining company so that their trucks could carry ore to a smelter that was located at Mexican Hat. We did see one Wing and three Harleys coming up when we were going back down, and they were doing just fine.

Grand Canyon is not far, nor is Mesa Verde, as previously mentioned. If you pass through Durango Colorado, you may want to consider spending a day on the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railway. Here is a short video clip that I got on short notice of double headed steam locomotives climbing a 2.5% grade: SP 18 and D&SNGRR 493 Climbing Hermosa Hill, SP 18 slips! It is a ride that is well worth the money, but you will need to make reservations well in advance to ensure your seats. If you end up in Durango for any amount of time, you should have breakfast one morning at Durango Diner, right downtown. Everything is homemade and the biscuits and gravy were absolutely awesome. Another great food experience in the area is the Bar D Chuckwagon one evening for a cowboy style dinner of beef, chicken, or steak followed by a wonderful live music show. Once again, reservations are highly recommended, and arrive early to get the best seats.

Further south, we visited Meteor Crater, between Flagstaff and Winslow Arizona, and just off of I-40. We spent a couple of hours there, far more time that we imagined, and it was well worth the visit.

A number of towns along I-40 are along historic Route 66. We spent quite a bit of time in Williams, and visited a number of shops there and enjoyed a relaxing dinner after a day at Grand Canyon.

A great ride on a bike (or any vehicle for that matter) with lots of mountain scenery is the San Juan Skyway in southwestern Colorado. It is a loop route that includes fantastic high mountain scenery and the famed Million Dollar Highway. The route is quite simple, and you can start from any town on the route that you like, but we started in Durango, travelling north to Silverton, then up over Red Mountain Pass, and down the Million Dollar Highway into Ouray for a quick soak at Ouray Hot Springs. From there is was north to Ridgway and lunch at the True Grit Cafe, then west over the Dallas Divide to Placerville, then back east to Telluride and Bridal Veil Falls. Next it was south to Rico, Dolores, and Cortez where we spent the night. To finish the loop, one would travel east back to Durango, but we went west to Four Corners Monument. If you like Native art or turquoise jewelry, a number of artisans can be found there selling their works. Be careful of what you purchase there, however, as the quality ranges from mediocre all the way to excellent, so shop around there before making any purchases if your interest runs to the more expensive jewelry. We were there in late September and the weather was great, but that section of the country would probably enjoy some of its best weather between Labor Day and the end of September. Just remember that snow is a real possibility in late September.

I could add more, but this post is long enough already!
 

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Great area to ride but Four Corners itself nothing great. Been there twice , once in a car with my wife and again with my brother on bikes. That was enought . Again that aera of the country is great with many places to see . If I ride that area of the country agin I will bypass Four Corners unless my route takes me past it.
 
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I am interested in riding the four corners in the Western US. I live in southern middle TN and would appreciate any input from your past experiences.

Thank you!
You can go to my blog to read about my experience. Start here and you'll find your way around.
 
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