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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
At the end of my most recent expedition to a Honda Dealership to deal with something (else), the mechanic showed me the cracked ABS plastic (2nd photo below) on the inside of the trunk lid where the passenger backrest is attached.

1. Is it just me, or do any of you find these newly pointed out broken things always follow on the heels of a visit to a dealership? I SWEAR, this wasn't cracked the last time I looked in the trunk, but who knows...

2. Is it just me, or do the indents on the backrest side of the trunk lid seem poorly designed? Shouldn't the plastic there be solid? Or does the stock backrest have matching raised surfaces? (I doubt it). See highlighted areas in 1st photo below.
Note: I replaced the stock seat and backrest with Corbin shortly after buying the bike in 2014.

3. Now for the meat and potatoes! Given that the cost to replace the trunk lid is in the neighborhood of $700, this would seem to be the obvious DIY project.
I have a couple of ideas to run past the august members of this forum. Do I,

a) epoxy some thin metal (aluminum? Copper? Stainless?) to the backrest side of the lid to prevent it from cracking further and provide some structural rigidity? Furthermore, it seems to me that this would allow some space for the wire harness that doesn't seem to be there now.

b) fill the indents with something as well?

c) epoxy a nice strip of Baltic birch plywood (with holes drilled where the mounting screws pass through) on the trunk side of the lid, applying a couple of coats of spar varnish and claim I went for a "Woody" finish?

d) remove the backrest and just forget about it?

or

e) pick from the expert, tried and true options provided in replies to this post?


Let 'er rip!

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I'm probably wrong, but I think the stock backrest is designed differently at the mounting points.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'm probably wrong, but I think the stock backrest is designed differently at the mounting points.
It's been years since I've looked at it, but I pulled the backrest out of storage and you're right. There are two nipples on the OEM seat that are not present on the Corbin. See photos below:

Bad Corbin! Also, in setting up to take the pictures, I noted the SIGNIFICANT difference in weight between their backrest (6 1/2 pounds) and the OEM's (3 1/2 pounds). Both probably are contributing factors to the cause of the crack.

Having said that, the Corbin seat is so much more comfortable than the OEM seat. It's staying on the bike. Now, I could swap out OEM backrest, but I think the textural difference in materials would not go unnoticed. So, it'll probably stay too.

I will have to fabricate some spacers to fill the gaps in the back part of the trunk lid when I attend to the crack.

Thanks for the nudge in the right direction Cantankerous one...

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If you can get a sheet of fiberglass fabric and some JB plastic weld put some JB Weld down and lay the sheet over it, press it down then let it cure. Follow up with another coat of JB and let dry. This will give you a repair twice a strong as it was before, remember this holds Corvette's together.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you can get a sheet of fiberglass fabric and some JB plastic weld put some JB Weld down and lay the sheet over it, press it down then let it cure. Follow up with another coat of JB and let dry. This will give you a repair twice a strong as it was before, remember this holds Corvette's together.
Does a the original color come through the (clear) JB weld and fiberglass cloth?
 

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It will probably not as you should rough it a bit but if it is not going to be front and center you should be able to paint it with a close auto spray paint that it shouldn't be noticeable, if I understand where it is it should not be noticeable. Auto paint is available at any Auto Parts store and people smarter than me have said Honda car paints are the same color as the bikes. I am color blind so the wife tells me what matches.😁
 

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Norm,
I found a product on either this or a BMW site that can be used to repair our "Tupperware". It's called Plast-aid and I've used it in a number of repairs with good results. Check out their website for more info. You may be able to file or grind a shallow V along the crack and fill it with this product. Good Luck!
Paul Collins
2010 GL-1800 with a Motortrike conversion in 2017
(Just got old and refused to quit riding)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Norm,
I found a product on either this or a BMW site that can be used to repair our "Tupperware". It's called Plast-aid and I've used it in a number of repairs with good results. Check out their website for more info. You may be able to file or grind a shallow V along the crack and fill it with this product. Good Luck!
Paul Collins
2010 GL-1800 with a Motortrike conversion in 2017
(Just got old and refused to quit riding)
Thanks Doc,

But I think I'm going a different direction. I purchased some 1/16" thick aluminum, some JB Weld Plastic Bonder (supposed to adhere metal to plastic) and some PVC spacers. I'll cut the aluminum into a strip wide enough to encompass both mounting holes (the 1/16"aluminum will make the entire area covered flush with the raised area by the mounting holes. I'll cut out a pair of u shaped slots to allow the strip to fit in where the trunk lid has those raised areas. Once bonded to the plastic, the strip should give me all the structural rigidity I need. On the seat-back side of the trunk lid, I'll fabricate an insert using some ABS putty or those spacers that will do the same job as the spacers on the stock seat.

I thought about making a second strip for the seatback side of the trunk lid, but if I glue that in, I won't have the option to reinstall the stock seat if or when I sell the GL1800 - assuming a buyer may not want to pay the premium for my Corbin seat.

I should have this done during the week, at which point I'll post photos of the finished product, if anyone cares to see it...
 

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drzzzz is correct. I have also used Plast-Aid. I also repaired a Vetter Fairing on my GL1000 back in 1980 that I used fiberglass and resin to repair a crack near a mount. I was able to get the fiberglass inside the fairing not to be seen and I ended up with a stronger area than what was new. I also layed a small amount of resin along the crack on the opposite side and let everything sit for a week before putting the fairing back on the bike. After everything cured you may want to sand it smooth. Fiberglass if not sanded can scratch your hand if not smoothed out.
 

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At the end of my most recent expedition to a Honda Dealership to deal with something (else), the mechanic showed me the cracked ABS plastic (2nd photo below) on the inside of the trunk lid where the passenger backrest is attached.

1. Is it just me, or do any of you find these newly pointed out broken things always follow on the heels of a visit to a dealership? I SWEAR, this wasn't cracked the last time I looked in the trunk, but who knows...

2. Is it just me, or do the indents on the backrest side of the trunk lid seem poorly designed? Shouldn't the plastic there be solid? Or does the stock backrest have matching raised surfaces? (I doubt it). See highlighted areas in 1st photo below.
Note: I replaced the stock seat and backrest with Corbin shortly after buying the bike in 2014.

3. Now for the meat and potatoes! Given that the cost to replace the trunk lid is in the neighborhood of $700, this would seem to be the obvious DIY project.
I have a couple of ideas to run past the august members of this forum. Do I,

a) epoxy some thin metal (aluminum? Copper? Stainless?) to the backrest side of the lid to prevent it from cracking further and provide some structural rigidity? Furthermore, it seems to me that this would allow some space for the wire harness that doesn't seem to be there now.

b) fill the indents with something as well?

c) epoxy a nice strip of Baltic birch plywood (with holes drilled where the mounting screws pass through) on the trunk side of the lid, applying a couple of coats of spar varnish and claim I went for a "Woody" finish?

d) remove the backrest and just forget about it?

or

e) pick from the expert, tried and true options provided in replies to this post?


Let 'er rip!

View attachment 273886

View attachment 273887

I just fixed a small crack in the front left lower fairing of my 95 Aspencade SE. These parts are made of ABS which is the same material as the black ABS plumbing you most likely have in your house. So....
  • Take a scrap of pipe and file it with a heavy tooth rasp.
  • Get a good size pile of ABS shavings and stick them in a disposable cup. (Test the cup to ensure the glue won't melt it)
  • Pour a blob of ABS plumbers glue on the pile of shavings and mix the glue into the pile.
  • This will melt the ABS shavings and you will end up with a pile of liquid ABS plastic.
  • Tape or otherwise hold the broken pieces together on the front.
  • Using an appropriate disposable tool (I used a screw head) Spread a layer of the ABS paste over the crack.
  • Let set overnight, the ABS paste bonds to the Broken parts creating one single piece of ABS that will be stronger than the original.

If you have a crack in a corner or need to reinforce a flat area for a mount you can cut a piece out of a large ABS pipe and heat it until it becomes soft - A toaster oven works for larger pieces or a heat gun for small pieces.

When the ABS is soft enough to work (be sure to wear gloves) Press it into place and clamp it until it cools.

Once cool cover the patch liberally with ABS cement and press it in place. It will set up quite quickly but clamp it or weight it to ensure a tight bond.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I just fixed a small crack in the front left lower fairing of my 95 Aspencade SE. These parts are made of ABS which is the same material as the black ABS plumbing you most likely have in your house. So....
  • Take a scrap of pipe and file it with a heavy tooth rasp.
  • Get a good size pile of ABS shavings and stick them in a disposable cup. (Test the cup to ensure the glue won't melt it)
  • Pour a blob of ABS plumbers glue on the pile of shavings and mix the glue into the pile.
  • This will melt the ABS shavings and you will end up with a pile of liquid ABS plastic.
  • Tape or otherwise hold the broken pieces together on the front.
  • Using an appropriate disposable tool (I used a screw head) Spread a layer of the ABS paste over the crack.
  • Let set overnight, the ABS paste bonds to the Broken parts creating one single piece of ABS that will be stronger than the original.
If you have a crack in a corner or need to reinforce a flat area for a mount you can cut a piece out of a large ABS pipe and heat it until it becomes soft - A toaster oven works for larger pieces or a heat gun for small pieces.

When the ABS is soft enough to work (be sure to wear gloves) Press it into place and clamp it until it cools.

Once cool cover the patch liberally with ABS cement and press it in place. It will set up quite quickly but clamp it or weight it to ensure a tight bond.
Well, it looks like I'm going to try my hand at alchemy after all. That aluminum strip I fabricated looked like it would be a great fit, until I noticed the little bump out on the front side of the trunk. There's just a little bit of contact there when I close the trunk lid. If I carve enough material off the strip to accommodate the bump-outs, there's less than a quarter inch covering the abs - right where the crack is.

I will give your solution a shot.

Thanks for the idea,
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Let us know how you make out.
It may be a while, I'll wait for the end of the season now.

By the way, my trunk lid isn't broken yet, just a little cracked. I'm thinking gluing a small patch on the back side (the side of the passenger seatback).
 

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If you cut an appropriately sized piece out of a pipe you can heat it with a heat gun - or the wifes oven if she's out shopping - until it is maleable. Press and hold it into the corner until it cools. Now you have a perfectly matched reinforcement to glue onto the back of the crack with plumbers ABS glue.
 
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