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When you are planning a trip, especially off-interstate travel in areas like the desert southwest or Alaska, I could see where it would be very important to know ahead of time where you could buy gas. Is there a this-web-site-has-it-all internet location for up to date gas info, or do you buy some kind of tour guide book for the area you will be traveling through? What are your favorite trip planning resources?
 

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If your a member of AAA they have trip maps and books that provide information such as lodging, food and fuel stops. If you know your route you can get specific info from them. Good luck and ride safe..
 

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AAA as Two Wheel mentions is a very valuable resource for travellers. Searching for individual tourism help is also as easy as Googling the specific locations and regions. Membership associations (not just motorcycle specific) can also provide much needed and useful information.
 

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As for the desert Sw esp in Central Arizona and the Navajo Reservation just because the map shows a gas station does not mean it is open. Freeway yes, but any where else beware. I recommend a 1 & 1/4 gallon rated gas can in heavy plastic with pour spout. These are not expensive and availble at any hardware store. Bungee this on your bike. Fill up every 100 miles or so. It is no fun looking for gas at midnight 40 miles from nowhere. Believe me there are lots of those places. NM has half the people as Arizona. Western Ks, Western Neb. and SE Colo are also places to be cautious. There are almost 7 million people in Arizona. 5 million of those live near two citys
 

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When you are planning a trip, especially off-interstate travel in areas like the desert southwest or Alaska, I could see where it would be very important to know ahead of time where you could buy gas. Is there a this-web-site-has-it-all internet location for up to date gas info, or do you buy some kind of tour guide book for the area you will be traveling through? What are your favorite trip planning resources?
Good question.
AAA is pretty good and Mile Post Magazine for Alaska and the Yukon region.
When I am in remote areas or on blue highways some little towns don't have gas stations, alot have closed. I try to fill up when I am down to a half tank, then I know I will always have at least a 180-200 mile range.:)
 

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ptwingmn. I noticed you list a 1980 Venture Royal in your list of bikes you have owned. Yamaha made a 1100 Venture in 1981. non in 1982. The 1983 Yamaha Venture Royale was a 1200. Made thru 1985. In 1986 they made a Royale 1300. Just wondering.
 

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Interesting 2003, never knew about the 1300 cc version.
 

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Knowledge behind this. I restored a 1983 Venture Royale when I decided to start riding again. They even made a few with the V-Maxx engine in them. Mine had it. They were the first full bodied factory built touring bike ever built.Showed mine all over south-east and took first place in motorcycle class at all shows. Should have never sold it, but she said "to many toys"!
 

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ptwingmn. I noticed you list a 1980 Venture Royal in your list of bikes you have owned. Yamaha made a 1100 Venture in 1981. non in 1982. The 1983 Yamaha Venture Royale was a 1200. Made thru 1985. In 1986 they made a Royale 1300. Just wondering.
Thanks for mentioning that. I appreciate it. It was a typo which I corrected.
I had a 1990 Yamaha Ha Ha Ha!.:)
 

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Good question.
AAA is pretty good and Mile Post Magazine for Alaska and the Yukon region.
When I am in remote areas or on blue highways some little towns don't have gas stations, alot have closed. I try to fill up when I am down to a half tank, then I know I will always have at least a 180-200 mile range.:)
No matter what I'm riding or driving when it hits the half tank mark I start looking.
We like to enjoy the ride and that does not include a saddle sore butt. So we don't mind stopping for for fuel at around 100 to 120 miles. Avoids saddle sores and you have a peace of mind not worrying about running out of fuel.
From the Northwest Corner
Ron
 

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The rest stops with tourist information were very helpful to us on a recent trip to South Dakota from Northern Ontario. After the Labor Day weekend we could not find any rest stop that was manned (womanned??) It appears that there is a season for rest stops, but, when available, the information is presented by knowledgeable locals who will inform you about anything you want to know.
 
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