Honda Goldwing Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In 2009, I purchased a 2006 yamaha 1700 silverado, and bought a trickle charger as suggested by the yamaha person. This year, I purchaxed a 2006 goldwing , and after reading some articles in wingworld, the impression I received is that not to use a trickle charger on honda batteries. I've only used the trickle once. Is a trickle charger tht bad for honda batteries? Could I hear from some people who have used the trickle with good or bad results? Also, I took the battery out of the bike for the winter and stored it in the bsmt, can i use a charger (either one) while still in the bike over canadian winters?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
trickle charger

I've always used a charger during the non riding months. never had a problem with it. honda uses the same batteries that other manufacturers use, so don't think that has anything to do with it. Riding is the most enjoyable way to charge the battery!!!!! Ride and enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
I have the battery tenders on the goodies around here. They come with a battery lead that lets you hook up without touching the battery. Kinda like hooking up trailer lights, but just a 2-wire plug. Nice part you can just leave them hooked up all the time. They monitor battery charge. Basically, they are just easier to deal with.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,853 Posts
I've used the battery tender on both my 98 GL1500 and now on my 09 GL1800. Have it about 10 years. I plug the bike in when pull the bike in the garage and disconnect when I take it out to ride. Never a problem with starting even after sitting all winter. Great product..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
I purchased a "charger" at Wally World. It's and automatic battery charger by Schumacher for both 6 and 12v lead acid batteries. It is factory wired with a quick connect and 2 different ends, clamps and rings. I installed the rings on the battery and extended the other end of the quick connect to the right side passenger pocket so I can connect the charger without taking the seat off. According to the manual, the charger will charge to a full charge of 14.4v and once the charge rate decreases to 0.5 amps the internal voltage reference switches to maintain 13.2v. "At this lower voltage charge, current is typically a few milli-amperes (.001 ampere). Under this condition most all batteries can be left charging indefinately." Had mine on for the winter, still using the same battery, now on it's 3rd season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Regular battery charges even the low 2 amp ones will boil the acid in small batteries and the gas produced will bleed off and it will go low on acid after awhile. The lead plates can also warp if left charging for a long enough period of time.I never leave a charger like a 2 amp on a small battery more than 24 hrs. even then thats risking an overcharge,
you might think you're not doing the battery any harm but its so easy to overcharge these small batteries.Its like trying to pour a full 5 gallon Gerry can into a 1 gallon container.

The low amp trickle chargers work for charging the smaller batteries but again they arn't designed to be left on the battery for an extended period of time,using one of these you should check the state of charge til it gets to the 13.8v approx, and then unplug it, the battery will drop back to approx, 12.4v or so,thats normal.

The Battery maintainer is designed to first charge the battery up to
13.8v which is called a surface charge, then go into a Float charge mode which deep charges the cells for a length of time at 13.8v then go into the maintenance charge which is actually when it shuts itself off and may sit dormant for a few days until it senses the voltage has dropped below a preset level approx. 12.8v it will turn on and charge again unil it reaches the maintenance 13.8v again and then shuts off.This cycling prevents acid gas,overcharging,and warped cells.
This may not be a very scientific explanation but hopefully one which is easy to understand.

The actual voltages quoted are only approximate but within the limits generally excepted in electrical sysyems using 12v

I agree with Whacker, he's right ,I just expalined it a bit differently.

-Robert-
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top