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does anyone know the correct way to transport a wing. I have a wheel dock/chock, need info on tie-downs, placement, type, etc.
 

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Best to use a four point tie-down, and use the heavy braided 1" ratchet straps, not just the cinch style straps as they can come lose. I always use the engine guard and bag guards as hook-up points. Use enough tension on the straps to compress the suspension adequately. Don't leave it on the stand either. You shouldn't have to worry about the front wheel moving if you have the wheel dock properly set.
 

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thanks. I have called 5-6 Honda dealers and looked on line. No one seems to know, for sure. Dealers tell me to use "Canyon Carvers", a handlebar strap system, others say use the case and bag guard bars, others say only the frame. I am new to the "wing", but can't understand why this info is so, so hard to find. Even the owners manual doesn't tell you anything more than "make sure you have a flat bed and secure the motorcycle". This is a popular bike, am I the only one to want to transport it?
 

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This is a popular bike, am I the only one to want to transport it?
I guess for most of us we just ride it. Not a lot of Wings on trailers. But I know there are times when riding is not practicle and you need to transport. I've never done it but it would seem to me that the engine and saddlebag guards are a good place to start. You might also want to use the seat handles since they are up higher and might provide more stability. I think the problem with attaching directly to the handlebars is all the controls that exist there and damage to wires and cables. Hope others can provide some input as well. Good luck and Ride (or trailer) safe..
 

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... Howdy ... Always Try To Strap Or Tie To The Highest Strong Points On The Wing ... Handle Bars Are Good Just Use Care Routing The Tie Downs ... A 4 Point Tie Down Is A Must And It Doesn't Hurt To Throw On A Couple Xtra ... Tie Down The Front First ... Happy Trails ... P.S. BUD-OK IS CORRECT TO USE RATCHET STRAPS ...
 

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I purchased my '09 wing this past April, since then I have been all over the western U.S. The bike now has 18k, so riding it is not an issue. Winter is coming, and I need to move my 5th wheel (toy hauler)and my bike, south for more riding. I am hooked on this bike, as it has exceeded my every expectation. My V-Twin buddies are jealous. That said I don't want my "wing" damaged as I travel, coming lose, or damaging it is not acceptable. Since it is in the toy hauler, I might not know something has happened until it is too late. Thx for the info
 

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I am not saying what is the right and wrong way; but here are some extra steps I take. I never strap to the guards. Read too many horror stories on other boards. Apparantly they are designed to be pushed on and not pulled on. I use softties to access the frame where the back guards are attached and tie that way. I also use soft ties to access above the triple tree on either side of the fork. I also remove the side covers and access the frame on each side of the bike (these are the two main points where I apply the most torque. Some extra steps I take is to place a block of soft wood with a pad on top under the engine block before ratcheting down the ties on either side of the fork. This prevents the fork from fully compressing and busting one if I hit a large pothole. I also use a canyon dancer but mostly just to hold the bike upright while I secure the other 6 straps. Also I leave the bike in nuteral to take stress off the tranny in case I hit a big bump. I tow over 1700 miles each winter (riding not an option) and have not had a problem. I almost forgot, there is a web page that demos most of this on the tulsa windshield website (allamericanprod.com).
 

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does anyone know the correct way to transport a wing. I have a wheel dock/chock, need info on tie-downs, placement, type, etc.
the best way to transport a wing is to ride it
 

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:D
the best way to transport a wing is to ride it
:D

Oh yea I'm with you!


Anyway if you have to I would think that you need to compress suspension slightly but not bottomed out, that gives some travel but firms it up on trailer floor to prevent shifting. As far as to what points to hook to I've never trailered so I would just use good judgement when making connection.
 

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Traveller, there is a product called a Canyon Dancer(at least here in Canada) but most are too short to use on the wide bars of the Goldwing, although they do come in different lengths. They were perfect for my ST1300 as well as most sport bikes. As mentioned by another poster here, the high points work the best, but I have never had an issue with the guards myself. To transport my bike in my hauler, I use the four ratchets on the guards, a front wheel chock device, as well as extra straps on the foot peg mounts (I use the two-end loop braided ties and put the ratchets through the free loop on one end) and go to another set of anchors on each side of the hauler; mine has six anchor hooks on each side. Make sure there is a considerable amount of compression of the suspension and you should be just fine. Of course, regular inspection of your 'precious' cargo is a must.
 

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we just trailered my nieces wing a few weeks ago, we put one strap on each engine guard and one across the seat
 

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I'm with Budoka and Foss on this. The engine guards are easily accessible without pinching cables or rubbing paint.

I can't see a problem with this. Each guard has 3 bolts holding to the frame whether is it pushes or pulls I can't see an issue with the stress on the frame or bolt.

I have trailered mine 3 times and used a harbor freight wheel chock. By itself, the bike sits upright. (not to be trailered like this but it is stable) After that a little tension on each strap to 'slightly' compress all the springs. This gives the bike the ability to react to a bump much as it would going down the road.

So far, no problems. it is simple, fast and easily checked.
 
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