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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ll describe my experience for reference and hopefully this may help others avoid the two trips and nearly 5 weeks of shop time spent diagnosing a TPMS light continuously on the dash.
The bike is a 2010 with 7 miles on the odometer when we picked it up on March 31st 2012. TPMS light came on during first ride after taking it home. NOT the low pressure indicator, but the light that indicates that there is a fault with the TPMS system.
First trip indicated a faulty receiving unit which was replaced. Took the bike home and the next day the light showed up after less than 10 miles. Returned it a second time. For whatever combination of reasons, it was one day short of 4 weeks before they discovered that the dealers procedure for coordinating the send/receive of new TPMS parts (per their Techline manual) was not up to date. This required going step-by-step with Techline rep over the phone until he informed them that their manual was not up to date. Once the proper instructions were forwarded to them, it was resolved quickly.
Replacing a TPMS receiver is not common, but maybe changing tires and/or wheels, which may require this programming procedure, might produce the same frustrating (to you and the dealer) issue.
If you do see it, ask your dealer to double-check with Honda Techline for the latest procedure on TPMS programming (or whatever it’s called). Part of the 4 weeks was the service department lying about when my bike was getting worked on. I would think a repeat warranty customer, with the most expensive bike they sell, would be kept at the top of the list once an opening on a lift is available. I’m not saying kick someone off a lift, but get me in when you say your ready and stay after it until your done. Obviously, I was wrong in my thinking. I can’t wait for the customer service survey person who calls within a week of every visit to the dealership.:mad:
 

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As with any automotive/motorcycle dealerships there are good good/okay/not so good/poor service departments. I think most, if they want to stay in business, attempt to provide good service in a reasonable time frame. Unfortunitally some do not meet that standard. There are a number of factors that go into providing good service. Things like training, availability of parts and in your case good documentation.

I will say that finding a good motorcycle dealership is somewhat more dificult than finding a good automotive dealership. So when you find one stick with them and remember to tell them when they do good job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm sure I'll stick with these guys for some time. Once they got me back on the rack the second time during the four week stay, they got it solved pretty quickly. These guys have been selling Honda MCs since 1965 and the founder's son is in charge of the motorsports group (they also sell vehicles at same location). The fix has worked for 3 days of commuting so far, so I think it is time to start installing some accessories.
 

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Glad you worries semm to be over. The TPMS recalibrating tool is awaiting 'recalibrating' in Canada. We were going to get one for our shop and Honda Tech said to wait due to the fix not being ready. Because of that I had to forgo my rear wheel swap-out for a new tire replacement wich doesn't require resetting the TPMS like a new wheel does. On the bright side I will now have two new Bridgestones on my Wing instead of just the front one. ;)
 
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