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I have done a lot of miles in the last 4 years. Port Lincoln is 400 miles and that was taking me 7.5 hrs. Jamison is 600 miles and that was taking 12 hrs. Kalgoorlie is 1400 miles and was taking 2 days. Our hwy speed in the eastern states is mainly 60mph. South Ausralia and the West is 68mph. Now the question is: to do distance of 850-900 mile in a day what speed would you be doing and how many hours would you expect to be on the road. The next question is how do you get around the speed traps if your speed limit is 70mph. We have alot of speed traps here and I would only sneek a couple of mph over the limit. I was running into the reserve tank on most fills. The range of my tank is about 140 miles. The trip with Kristian was a bit different because of his legs. That was 500 miles in 12 hrs. I am just interested in how you do it. I am not question the fact that you can, because there is a lot of you guys that do. Eric
 

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My longest day has been 650 miles and it took me 12 hours. Most of this was on two lane or divided highways with speed limits of 55 to 65. Some of it was on Interstates where the speed limit is 70. Usually here in the states you can get away with 4 to 7 over the limit. But whenever I’m on a local highway and come to a small town I slow down to the posted limit just in case of speed traps.

I think that I could do a 900 mile day if it was all Interstate highways and it would take around 14 hours or so. This would be traveling at 75 to 77 and limiting my stops as much as possible. While I think I can, I probably will not. A distance of 600 to 700 miles is about all I want.
 

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Eric,

Although I have not riden the distances discussed here, I understand your question. I don't doubt it just trying to do the math and convert to a "pain in the arse" quotient. My longest distance was on a BMW 1150R about 8 yrs ago.. 680 miles. I was pushing it at least from my perspective. Now I'm 8 yrs older and on a Goldwing. Granted a better machine for the long distance but even then I question in my "Miami to New Orleans" post if it is feasible to do the 850 miles in a day. I guess feasible is not the right word and whatever word you chose, it is a personal preference right? I'll find out for myself soon but short of forcing the issue or trying to prove a point, I think I'll probably do 600 on day 1 and 250 on day 2. My route will be Interstate Hwy the entire way with speed limit of 70mph so add 5mph to that, set it and forget it. I am guessing that 11 hours later I am more than ready to call it a day. Agreeing with Crownfire... I probably could do the 850 or 900 miles but probably won't.

Interested in hearing what others experiences are...
 

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Ortho Delux pad with sheep skin cover. Lots of water and a cool vest in hot weather.
 

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Take the Interstate Roads

I have done a lot of miles ... I am just interested in how you do it. I am not question the fact that you can, because there is a lot of you guys that do. Eric
The last IBA run I did, I traveled exclusively on 4-lane+ divided highway, with posted speed limit of 70MPH. Me and my traveling companions went from Gallatin, TN, USA to Weatherford, OK, USA (the turnaround) and back to Ft Smith, AK, USA, straight through, stopping only for gas and a quick bite. It took us 18 hours to go the complete 1,033 miles for that leg, and we averaged 57MPH (that's 85MPH while riding, making minimal stops for gas breaks, and staying with the traffic around us; we didn't pass many folks). At Ft Smith, we got about six hours sleep and headed for home, arriving 35 hours after departure, so we qualified for a BunBurner 1500 as well.

I don't recommend or advocate speeding, but it does help to stay with the flow of traffic. Theoretically, for a SaddleSore 1000, you'd need to travel at least 44MPH for 24 hours (now add stops for fuel, toilet, eats and you'll need to bump that up to between 48-55MPH and ride the whole 24 hours). As you can see, we rode 85MPH, but averaged only 57MPH or 67% of our riding speed. So, if you ride about 67MPH for a full 24 hours with minimal stops (every 150 miles), you should average around 50MPH.

Hope this helps. I would recommend good upfront planning of your route, stops, etc. and then go for it. If you don't make it on your first try, adjust your plan (riding time of day, aux gas tank, etc.) until you find a combination that works for you.

Good Luck,
 

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I have done a lot of miles in the last 4 years. Port Lincoln is 400 miles and that was taking me 7.5 hrs. Jamison is 600 miles and that was taking 12 hrs. Kalgoorlie is 1400 miles and was taking 2 days. Our hwy speed in the eastern states is mainly 60mph. South Ausralia and the West is 68mph. Now the question is: to do distance of 850-900 mile in a day what speed would you be doing and how many hours would you expect to be on the road. The next question is how do you get around the speed traps if your speed limit is 70mph. We have alot of speed traps here and I would only sneek a couple of mph over the limit. I was running into the reserve tank on most fills. The range of my tank is about 140 miles. The trip with Kristian was a bit different because of his legs. That was 500 miles in 12 hrs. I am just interested in how you do it. I am not question the fact that you can, because there is a lot of you guys that do. Eric
Hi Eric
To keep the Police at bay, I use a Valentine 1 Radar detector. Has both front and rear facing antennas so you know if they are in front or behind you. I only crank it up out in the wide open spaces. Yes, our speed limits are mostly 70 but usually you can add about 4 mph and get away with it. Travel is usually best the day after a big holiday cause the cops have worked the holiday and most of them are home sleeping and dreaming of doughnuts. And most of all, it is pure luck and gut feeling. If you think there may be trouble ahead, you can slow down a tad for a while. And I never do it when there is a lot of traffic. My Wing goes a little over 220 miles without re-fueling so I try to plan my stops around the 180 to 200 mile mark.
The pic tells the whole story of my last trip to Colorado. And oh yes, I found that you eat light during the trip. I never thought you could get sleepy on a bike but I was wrong. Snacks all the way.

Later
Isaac
 

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The farthest I have ridden was 700 miles in two days on my CM400.
 

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I-40 I take it was where that max speed was touched?
 

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I-40 I take it was where that max speed was touched?
No, actually in 2 places. I don't like interstates so I go back roads as much as possible. Once just south of Sweetwater TX and the other between Walsenburg and Salida Colorado. Road was empty and weather was nice and I was alone. Now if your a Lawman, it was just south of Kansas City and again just north of Nome Alaska. Used to drive I-40 every so often but its not the same anymore. Outside of Amarillo where it drops off the caprock into New Mexico you used to be able to get some good speeds but it seems that every time I go through there now there is some black and white at the bottom just waiting and watching. :rolleyes: Won't be long before they tell you that you can't drink on the job.
 

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Thank you for your responce. Basically what you are saying is the same as my experience. So it all comes down to the risk that you are willing to take. When I was young I sometimes would ride the 400 miles at night to Port Lincoln with the risk of roos. Then in 1983 I hit one at 80 mph. That put me off the bike for a long time. I will still ride at night but try to limit it to no more than 2 hour. In the last 2 months I have had 3 close call with roos 2 times with my daughter on the back. For me I think I will stick with 600 miles, but I understand the temptation to try and get to a location 850 miles in a day. My second daughter lives 750 miles away and in the theory......... you know the story.
 

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Thank you for your responce. Basically what you are saying is the same as my experience. So it all comes down to the risk that you are willing to take. When I was young I sometimes would ride the 400 miles at night to Port Lincoln with the risk of roos. Then in 1983 I hit one at 80 mph. That put me off the bike for a long time. I will still ride at night but try to limit it to no more than 2 hour. In the last 2 months I have had 3 close call with roos 2 times with my daughter on the back. For me I think I will stick with 600 miles, but I understand the temptation to try and get to a location 850 miles in a day. My second daughter lives 750 miles away and in the theory......... you know the story.
I think you hit the nail on the head by saying its comes down to the risk factor. I find it hard to stop when I have already done 9 hours and only have about 4 to go. Logic would say that I should have stopped hours ago but well, the weather was nice, I felt good, etc. Fortunately we don't have the roo problem here but I am in the most area where white tail deer are thick as fleas. In fact this is the most densely populated area in the country for these boogers. I try not to do much driving at night either. I am just glad you didn't get laid up permanently by your roo encounter. I hear them things get big.
Then there is ego to deal with. Why, I can make that 900 miles in one day. Shoot, my 20 year old neighbor did it so I must be able to click off those last 200 miles. Yes sir...no problem.
Well, I might not do it again but who knows? But boy, that Goldwing sure is sweet and it just purrs. Love it....:)
Isaac
 

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I hope I am not boring you with this. But the Jameison run which was 600 miles didn't get done on the bike in winter for 2 reason. 1:There was not enough daylight hours and so you had the roos and wild deer for the last 30 miles and they were more dangerious than the roos.2:It was about 5c in the day in the mountains and black ice on the road and on the way home it was a must do because the next day I was at work. So it then become a car trip. On one of the car trips I hit black ice on a corner [ where else would you get it, but at the worst place] and managed to get around the corner. I was thinking geee that was lucky and more lucky I was not on the bike. Eric
 

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Animal Obstacles

Thank you for your responce. Basically what you are saying is the same as my experience. So it all comes down to the risk that you are willing to take....... you know the story.
Yes, you have the same problem with the roos that we have with the White-Tailed Deer in the Southeastern and Midwest US. Although, our highway department puts up animal fences along the major highways to somewhat discourage the animals from "wandering/grazing" onto the highway; they still do jump the fence to do so.

I'd err toward safety; an Iron Butt anything is not worth your life or health. You're a brave soul to have had so many encounters and still are willing to ride a night under those conditions.

Here, we use deer alert devices (little tubes mounted parallel to the direction of travel that "whistle" a high pitch that the animals can hear but we don't. It gives them a little warning we're coming. Do the Kangaroos react to such precautions?

Anyway, stay safe and if you ever get your ride completed, don't hesitate to let us all know of your success.

Good Luck!
 

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Roo Whistle

I had 3 roo whistle on the bike. I don't know if they do anything to protect you. I have had them [roos] just sitting there as you go by.Was that the roo shoo working, I don't know. At night with my daughter on the back, the roo went right across in front of us to the other side. So in that instance I would say he took no notice of the roo shoo. On the last trip with my daughter it was 1pm and they shouldn't be around. On that occasion the roo came flying out to the edge of the black stuff where he appied full brakes, the ABS was working over time [that was the roos ABS]. I had a fist full of brakes as well when he deceided to do a U turn on the spot as roos can do. Did the roo shoo help there, I don't know. You can go a long time without see one and yet in the last 6 months with my daughter with me we have had 2 close ones. I may have to look at putting more in my first aid kit. Eric
 

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When we were there in 2003 we never saw a single roo when driving, but then we were caravaning and were stopped by about 4:00 every night, and then we just hoofed it around after dark in the towns and cities we stayed at. Saw lots of finished off ones on the roadside though, especially around Bundaberg. As for long days, I've never logged more than 800 miles in a day, but lts of long hours in the saddle. We travelled from here to Sturgis and back with five bikes, two days there and two days back average of 15 hours each day (and we were travelling pretty close to 80 mph all the time). I was game for longer days, but my HD riding mates were pretty much done in every day. The last day coming home we fueled up and were going to ride about another hour, and one of the guys said "eff it, you guys go if you want, I'm not going another effing mile". I thought it was kinda funny, him supoosedly the die-hard biker of the group, and me the lone Jap-scrap rider (that was on the Vulcan).
 

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Hi Budoka: All I can say is that he did a good job getting that far. The longer you are in the saddle the harder it gets. I don't know if it's the battle in the mind but I can remember having got to the 550 miles and thinking if home was not 50 miles away, you could go shove it. With the roos, a lot of that is where you ride. On the road with lots of traffic it's less likely to hit one. Last year a mate of mine near Port Lincoln was riding home and pulled out to pass a truck and as he just get past a roo came out of the bush and he hit it. Then the truck came along and pushed him and his wife down the road a bit. She was in hospital for 6 weeks and Kim 24 weeks. Kiim is a big boy if you get my drift. He is talking of getting back on a bike. Eric
 

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I did the 1500 miles in less than 36 hr to get my IB. I rode thru KY,VA,WV,MD,DE,NJ,PA. I rode for 21 straight hours slept about 4 and brought her home. The goal is to try to do 200 miles in 3 hours. Pull up to the pump run in empty the bladder and grab a water or Gatorade refill your bike and yourself and roll away in 10 minutes.
Everyone is different but I will not move my car to stop you if you are doing 19 over on an interstate. City streets or neighborhood is 14 over and I will not move. That is just me. I usually travel about 80 or 81 when the limit is 70 an have blown right by the radar gun, BUT I have been nailed at 12 over.
Deer whistles from what I have read makes NO DIFFERENCE at all. I am more scared of the four legged critters than the four wheeled critters. :D
 
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