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Discussion Starter #1
I have Tire Guard TPMS on my 2005 GL1800. I have had this unit for several years using it on 2 Harleys and my GL1500 and 2001 Goldwing. But even with new batteries I have found that the rear sensor is really slow in transmitting changes in pressure. My front unit will show increases from a cold tire to a warming up tire in just a mile or so. But the rear won't show a change for sometimes 30 miles. I am thinking of replacing the system and am wondering what may be the best that others are using.
 

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Have you tried swapping the sensors to see if the rear tire is just slower to heat up?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No, I have not swapped the sensors. But, when I take it off the receiver will read zero for the rear tire. I am wondering if there might be more interference between the rear sensor and the receiver. I made a ram mount for the receiver.
 

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The OP only got 2 responses on this thread. I'd like to keep it alive as I am also looking to purchase a TPMS for my 2008 wing. I'd like to use a system that would work with an app on my phone as opposed to mounting a monitor somewhere upfront. There are lots of brands to choose from and prices are all over the place. Even worse people don't know how to write a review. Most reviews I've read are either useless babble or they are negative. So, tell us what TPMS you have. Does it work reliably or is it a dud?

Thanks!
KW
 

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Sorry Kieth, I also use a system with dedicated readout. I have the Steelmate system and have not even needed to replace a battery in the three years it has been on the bike.

To the OP, my TPMS also shows slower change in rear tire pressure. The rear tire is larger with more volume than the front on my GL1800. And if early in your ride you hit twisties (just 1/4 mile from my house), that rapidly puts heat in the front. Eventually, the rear will increase even more than the front - I attribute this to the proximity of the rear tire to the mufflers.
 

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Sorry Kieth, I also use a system with dedicated readout. I have the Steelmate system and have not even needed to replace a battery in the three years it has been on the bike.

To the OP, my TPMS also shows slower change in rear tire pressure. The rear tire is larger with more volume than the front on my GL1800. And if early in your ride you hit twisties (just 1/4 mile from my house), that rapidly puts heat in the front. Eventually, the rear will increase even more than the front - I attribute this to the proximity of the rear tire to the mufflers.

Actually, that isn't entirely correct. On an Indy car with wide flat slicks, yes that will increase the operating temps on a tire. But on a motorcycle (go easy darksider fans) heating up a m/c tire requires acceleration and braking forces to generate the most heat. What heat is generated by cornering forces is minimal in comparison to acceleration and braking. You will generate as much heat in normal riding modes due to friction and regular rolling resistance between the tire and the road surface and that is what raises the air pressure gradually. Ask any race crew chief and he'll concur. That's why we use tire heaters before a race and then the racer will use acceleration and braking during the warmup lap before getting aggressive in corners.
 

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My rear tire still shows slower increase than the front. And, since the front is smaller and undergoes the vast majority of braking forces on a motorcycle, it makes sense that the buildup in it is faster over that twisty section leaving home. Once I get out to steady highway driving, the rear catches up and passes (as far as amount of increase in psi). But then I do run the safer run-flat on the rear.

First time I've ever heard someone try to equate Indy car phenomena to a GoldWing!
 

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I am also using the Tire Guard system on my 2012. I have the one with the extra two sensors for a trailer. I use it when I tow my Roll A Home camper.

I am running dark side on the rear and it takes a little longer for the rear to warm up. I have not had any problems with this system at all. I mounted the remote with Velcro just below the ignition key so I can see it. When I don't want to use it, I just pull it off the dash. As others have said, each tire will heat up at different rates. I have noticed this when I have the trailer on and can watch all 4 heat up.

Try switching the sensors as stated. Just remember, they will be switched on your remote if you do this. I have not had any problems with the remote reading the sensors on the trailer. They are a lot further away from the remote than the rear tire is.

I would not worry about this. If it is giving you a good cold pressure reading, it is doing it's job. If it goes up slow, it is still doing it's job. You are looking for lower than normal pressure. That is what causes problems.

KW,

If you want something for your phone, then you will need to go to a RV system. They have them. They are just like the Tire Gard system. There might be a bike version out there now. I just have not looked in a few years because the one I have works for me. I would just stick with the style with the remote for a bike. It is always showing your pressure at a quick glance. With your phone, you will have to keep that app on all the time and just run your phone down for nothing. But, that is me.
 
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