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Discussion Starter #1
So give me some advice on riding a Wing. Mine is a 1990 SE. The last big heavy bike was a 47 Indian Chief when I was 23. I'm sure this one will handle much better but never the less I'm a little nervous. So any tips would be greatly appreciated. Doug
 

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While I am no expert with the Wing yet, I just got mine last weekend and have only ridden it a couple of times so far......it's been at the dealership having some maintenance done, I have been riding a Suzuki Volusia a 600lb bike itself, the weight of the Wing will disappear once you are moving at any speed, where I can feel the weight of it is in slow speed maneuvers, parking lots, around gas pumps, etc, probably will be even heavier with someone on the back with you. Just be careful with slow speed maneuvers and don't ride 2 up until you are comfortable with it on your own and you will probably be fine.

You might consider taking the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course if you haven't ridden for a number of years

OOOH- Countersteering.....practice your countersteering, you willl need to be able to lay the bike over quickly and without thinking about it in an emergency avoidance maneuver.

I'm sure someone here with more "Wing" experience will give you better advice than me
 

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So give me some advice on riding a Wing. Mine is a 1990 SE. The last big heavy bike was a 47 Indian Chief when I was 23. I'm sure this one will handle much better but never the less I'm a little nervous. So any tips would be greatly appreciated. Doug
When was it you last rode ?? If a long time take local MSF course.
One thing to do is find a empty parking lot some place and practice braking, and slow speed riding. Turns,loops figure 8's.
Besure you are comfortable with the bike before you take you Bride for a ride.
Also alway square up the handle bars before stopping. Stopping with the bars turned is a good way to dump the bike.
If you feel it going over just let it down easy as you can, once over that certain point you can hurt yourself trying to stop it.
To pick it up, this is a one person job and not that hard when done right.
1. Shut bike off
2. Put it in gear or tie the hand brake down so the bike won't roll when you are lifting.
3. If the left side is up, put the side stand down, so you rest the bike on it once you get it up.
4. Back up to the bike ,squat down, get hold of the handle bar grip and the down side passenger hand grip .
5. Now start lifting with Your legs NOT Your Back
6. When the bike is up turn and face the bike and do what has to be done. Either put the side stand down or lay it over onto the already down side stand.
Hope this helps some.
 

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Here are a few other things:
1. Until you get used to the throttle and clutch...the Wing will jump in first gear. You may find it easier to use 2nd for slow maneuvers.
2. Relax your hands, elbows and shoulders...amazing difference in handling.
3. Braking will be both rear and front until you are at the stop. The last few feet are totally with the front, so you don't feel like you have to hurry foot down for the stop.
4. On inclines I still hold the hand brake. When its time to go I engage the clutch to hold position and release the brake.
5. Come to a stop with the front wheel straight, not turned. If you come in with the wheel turned.....Good chance, your gonna drop it at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
While I am no expert with the Wing yet, I just got mine last weekend and have only ridden it a couple of times so far......it's been at the dealership having some maintenance done, I have been riding a Suzuki Volusia a 600lb bike itself, the weight of the Wing will disappear once you are moving at any speed, where I can feel the weight of it is in slow speed maneuvers, parking lots, around gas pumps, etc, probably will be even heavier with someone on the back with you. Just be careful with slow speed maneuvers and don't ride 2 up until you are comfortable with it on your own and you will probably be fine.

You might consider taking the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course if you haven't ridden for a number of years

OOOH- Countersteering.....practice your countersteering, you willl need to be able to lay the bike over quickly and without thinking about it in an emergency avoidance maneuver.

I'm sure someone here with more "Wing" experience will give you better advice than me
I've never stopped riding since I was 10 but it been years since I handled a bike this heavy. The BMW only weighed 500 lbs the Honda reflex scooter is 350 ish so 900 lbs is a little intimidating. At 23 a Henderson in line 4 cylinder wasn't a big deal at 1400 plus lbs- that's another story never rev and drop the clutch of an in line 4 it will be on top of you.
 

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When was it you last rode ?? If a long time take local MSF course.
One thing to do is find a empty parking lot some place and practice braking, and slow speed riding. Turns,loops figure 8's.
Besure you are comfortable with the bike before you take you Bride for a ride.
Also alway square up the handle bars before stopping. Stopping with the bars turned is a good way to dump the bike.
If you feel it going over just let it down easy as you can, once over that certain point you can hurt yourself trying to stop it.
To pick it up, this is a one person job and not that hard when done right.
1. Shut bike off
2. Put it in gear or tie the hand brake down so the bike won't roll when you are lifting.
3. If the left side is up, put the side stand down, so you rest the bike on it once you get it up.
4. Back up to the bike ,squat down, get hold of the handle bar grip and the down side passenger hand grip .
5. Now start lifting with Your legs NOT Your Back
6. When the bike is up turn and face the bike and do what has to be done. Either put the side stand down or lay it over onto the already down side stand.
Hope this helps some.
Here is a video that will help with this:
 

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While I am no expert with the Wing yet, I just got mine last weekend and have only ridden it a couple of times so far......it's been at the dealership having some maintenance done, I have been riding a Suzuki Volusia a 600lb bike itself, the weight of the Wing will disappear once you are moving at any speed, where I can feel the weight of it is in slow speed maneuvers, parking lots, around gas pumps, etc, probably will be even heavier with someone on the back with you. Just be careful with slow speed maneuvers and don't ride 2 up until you are comfortable with it on your own and you will probably be fine.

You might consider taking the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course if you haven't ridden for a number of years

OOOH- Countersteering.....practice your countersteering, you willl need to be able to lay the bike over quickly and without thinking about it in an emergency avoidance maneuver.

I'm sure someone here with more "Wing" experience will give you better advice than me
Your MSF will dispute this. They do not recommend laying the bike down as an emergency avoidance maneuver. This is a write up on the Alabama MSF facebook page about our former governor Bob Riley.
"I'm sure that everyone has heard that our former GOV was involved in an accident in Alaska. While we are all thankful that he will recover (broken ribs, collar bone, punctured lung, scrapes/bruises, etc), I want to emphasize that there should be no situation where you need to "lay your bike down." Braking and/or Swerving is the appropriate action. Ride Safe"
 

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Your MSF will dispute this. They do not recommend laying the bike down as an emergency avoidance maneuver. This is a write up on the Alabama MSF facebook page about our former governor Bob Riley.
"I'm sure that everyone has heard that our former GOV was involved in an accident in Alaska. While we are all thankful that he will recover (broken ribs, collar bone, punctured lung, scrapes/bruises, etc), I want to emphasize that there should be no situation where you need to "lay your bike down." Braking and/or Swerving is the appropriate action. Ride Safe"
I agree with you.....I didn't say to lay the bike "down" but when you counter steer it lays or "leans" the bike "over" in the opposite direction of the counter steer so that you can swerve quickly. Pushing on the right bar will lay or "lean" the bike over to the right, pushing the left bar will lay or "lean" the bike over to the left.

I think you just misunderstood what I was trying to say or maybe I didn't word it correctly.
 

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Welcome to the forums nohandles, what part of northern Ohio are you from? We have a number of GWRRA chapters here in Ohio and they are great in getting their members training in riding safely. Matter of fact GWRRA is offering trial memberships. Well worth a membership. Sorry I can't help with riding tips of a Goldwing since it's more less an extension of myself nowadays. Found I've been overthinking my riding skills, instead of just going with the flow. Just remember, it's a touring machine, not a road racer, even though it can perform like one at times.
 

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Nohandles,

One thing an esteemed member of this forum can tell you is do not try to move your Wing while in stocking feet!
 

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Welcome to the GWOF from Seattle.

We enjoy ride reports speckled with crisp clear pictures. Don't let the truth get in the way of a good story.

The GWRRA offers courses such as advanced riders course, trailer hauling course and trike riding. They are very inexpensive for members taught by GWRRA members who know how to handle the bike and it's tendencies.

I highly recommend the GWRRA groups (Goldwing Road Riders Association) to find folks who ride wings in your area. When you attend chapter meetings you will find friendly folks that ride the same motorcycle you do, and like the members of this forum, they know their motorcycle.

You can find a local chapter by going their website: http://www.gwrra.org
 

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I think you will find that you will take to it like a duck to water. You have all the skills you require. Take it easy for a while and then you will find yourself chucking it around with ease.
I know the feeling that this is a big bike but they are so well balanced when on the move. Just remember the weight at low speed and think about any slopes. You don't want that weight moving on a slope. Tell us about your adventures.
Eric
 

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I think you should get to know your Wing by checking it over completely. It is getting old and I am sure it has been worked on by many people over the years.
Did they forget some fasteners? perhaps the previous owner was a stunt rider.
Make sure that all is well with your Wing. Check things like wheel bearings, Brakes, Fork bearings etc. One of the guys that I ride with in the MSTA crashed his wing in New York after the crash he rode it back to Florida once he got back he inspected the bike to find out he had a broken frame. My point is this guy is a Motorcycle and a wing
expert and he did not know his frame was broke until he checked it out. So please regardless of your experience level check you bike over Completely. as far as riding tips I would recommend fitting the bike to you, anything that is adjustable to the rider do so. A good fitting bike is priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Welcome to the forums nohandles, what part of northern Ohio are you from? We have a number of GWRRA chapters here in Ohio and they are great in getting their members training in riding safely. Matter of fact GWRRA is offering trial memberships. Well worth a membership. Sorry I can't help with riding tips of a Goldwing since it's more less an extension of myself nowadays. Found I've been overthinking my riding skills, instead of just going with the flow. Just remember, it's a touring machine, not a road racer, even though it can perform like one at times.
I live in North Ridgeville about 20 miles west of Cleveland.
 

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As I was saying Doug, keep the handle bars straight when stopping. True of all bikes but particularly true of perhaps one of the heaviest bikes out there. I know what I'm talking about. This weekend I borrowed my neighbors tractor to disc my garden and rode my Wing over to his house to pick it up. When I left his house and rode down his grassy driveway to the street, which is on a steep hill, I looked both ways at the road and a small car was driving very fast down the street. I've had a bad habit lately (my bad) of slowing at stop signs and if the coast is clear to upshift to second and continue on. When I saw the car my handlebars were already turned and I grabbed a fist full of front brake and down she went. It couldn't have been a more perfect place to drop it in the grass at 1mph. My neighbor saw the whole thing as he came over and offered to help but I wanted to try out getting it up by myself. I've seen the video as the bike was in gear, I dropped the kick stand and I grabbed the right handle bar pulling it in towards me and the rear passenger handle and assumed a squatting position. My first attempt found my feet sliding out and I couldn't get any traction. I re-positioned my feet and got a little more upright and lifted with my legs. I was afraid that it would flop over on the kickstand too hard however when I brought it up I could easily balance it without it going over the other way. It was easier to lift than I imagined. Doug, you may want to practice this in your front yard too (not dropping it accidentally) but gently easy it down on the crash bars.

The second thing I would recommend is to shift out of 1st gear quickly and get through all your gears swiftly and into 5th. Get familiar with the engine power and transmission before using it's full potential. I like to use engine braking as I always downshift all the way down to 2nd when stopping except for panic stops.

I had a GL 1200 before the 1500 and find the 1500 more balanced for me probably because the 1200 had an aftermarket seat and sat higher. The 1500 is also lower as I can flat foot mine. That made a huge difference to me.
 

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Congrats on the wing. All I can tell you is practice, practice, practice. Ride in areas like low traffic roads hopefully with a experianced friend not far behind. A nice large parking lot is a good idea also to get the feel of the bike. The 1500 as I have is very well balanced with low centre of gravity.

Have fun and ride safe.
 

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stop overthinking and get on and go ride, your putting too much thought in the size of the bike afterall it is just a bike
 

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stop overthinking and get on and go ride, your putting too much thought in the size of the bike afterall it is just a bike
Doc's right...Size doesn't matter:D
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Doc's right...Size doesn't matter:D
BIG NEWS! I rode a 2010 1800 today. Whoo Haa nothing to ride. My buddy who had owned 4 Wings came over tonight on his beautiful gray wing thinking I would have mine home today. We talked a while and he said just get the " edited for young audiences" and take a ride. So after a pre flight talk and check out I took off. I took it easy and went to the park at the end of my street where I did some low speed maneuvers. It handles much better than my Dad's and my old 37 Henderson, 37 Harley and the Indians especially the 1908 Thor direct drive 500. I don't see any problem riding this Kitten. Now don't take that wrong I have complete respect for 2 wheeled machines.
When I came back he said "now the graduation run" hot shot and piled on weighing in at 225. Wow I found it easier to hold him up on the wing than the old BMW or the reflex with my 125 lb wife on the back. I'm ready but not stupid. I wouldn't jeopardize my loving wife so since she is in Florida next week I will burn 3 or 4 tanks of fuel practicing.
For the comment about checking everything out I intend to pull the cowling and check every nut and bolt. Last I got a call from the original owner who has all the records since 1990. Everything is upgraded on this one. He is as anal as me about bikes. So hope to get together with all you Ohio Wing rides soon! Doug

PS Did I say I almost souled my panties when I took off. LOL!
 
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