Honda Goldwing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I find the bike is easy to drop. It has happend 2x to me and I am a big man. If the bike loses balance, it is going down and you cannot stop it. The time it can happen is turning the bike around on a street and at a standstill when you lose footing. How many will admit they have dropped their wing and if so, how many times?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
636 Posts
No Shame in laying one down. Have done so several times, under different conditions.
It is just a bit embarrassing if you have an audience. Just learn to live with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Couldn't drop mine even if I tried, lol. (That's one of the main reasons I went to three!) :)
 
G

·
Mrrko, don’t rely on physical strength to hold your bike up. You would do an inch more leaning on both sides compared to a guy not that strong, then down she goes. Concentrate instead on having a total balance on your stop, with your feet gently touching the ground. On tight turns learn to feather your movement with the clutch. Practice as much as you can without a passenger.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,742 Posts
And make sure your front wheel is pointed straight ahead when you stop. Stopping with the wheel turned one way or the other is inviting the bike to tip over on that side.:eek::rolleyes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
581 Posts
Now everyone knows a wing likes to take a "nap" every now and then.......LOL.

WELCOME to the CLUB MRRKO !!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,643 Posts
As mentioned, it's all a matter of practice and getting the feel for it. It's a bit similar to Judo, technique versus brute strength.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
I dropped mine for the first time on the way to Kalispell this summer. Thankfully a certain forum administrator was on hand to help me get her back up :D (thanks again Budoka). Now is that a full service forum or what!!

And make sure your front wheel is pointed straight ahead when you stop. Stopping with the wheel turned one way or the other is inviting the bike to tip over on that side.:eek::rolleyes:
I'm pretty sure that's what happened the second time I dropped :eek:, on the way home from Kalispell, combined with a road sloped downward to one side and sloped up to the front. That time I had no help but got her back up without too much difficulty. At least I know I can do it now, and have laid her over gently in the garage a couple of times since while I play with rear tires.

Cheers,
Kerry
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,742 Posts
Wow Kerry; you picked it up by yourself, Now you are in the
BIG BOYS Club.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I just posted my 2 experiences in the IDMWT thread. Picking the bike up by yourself is not hard. There is a video on you tube on how to do this. I saw it and I was able to pick it back up. Everyone needs to see this and know how to get it back up by yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
I just posted my 2 experiences in the IDMWT thread. Picking the bike up by yourself is not hard. There is a video on you tube on how to do this. I saw it and I was able to pick it back up. Everyone needs to see this and know how to get it back up by yourself.
Yes, thankfully I had seen a couple of those videos before it was my turn.

The only thing missing from those videos is how to look for all the onlookers in the hotel parking lot like you really intended to lay her over :D.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,158 Posts
my cb 450 nighthawk weighs in around 400lbs mrrko and if it goes tooo far over there is no saving it. its not just wings its all bikes, there is a piont of no return because you just don't have the leverage to up right the bike
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,742 Posts
Yes, thankfully I had seen a couple of those videos before it was my turn.

The only thing missing from those videos is how to look for all the onlookers in the hotel parking lot like you really intended to lay her over :D.
What you gotta do in that case, is jump off the bike and start shouting things like That *&%*@ thing came loose again,that the last time I'm letting that *&*%^*#@ shop work on this bike. those @*%#* are going to hear from my Lawyer. Then you get down on your knees and make like your fixing something.
Works every time.:eek::rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
What you gotta do in that case, is jump off the bike and start shouting things like That *&%*@ thing came loose again,that the last time I'm letting that *&*%^*#@ shop work on this bike. those @*%#* are going to hear from my Lawyer. Then you get down on your knees and make like your fixing something.
Works every time.:eek::rolleyes:
ROFL!! I'll try to remember that. (Better brief my wife first though :eek:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
My two cents...
Yes, you are right. The 'Wings size and configuration makes it like none other in terms of balance management. It is a big, beautiful bike. They don't call motorcycling a sport for nothing. It is a sport and like all the others, practice makes you better. Some others here have given some great tips based on their experiences.

I've seen some amazing things done by skilled riders. For example, You would be shocked how slow you can go and how tight a turn can be made on something as large as a Goldwing without tipping. One of the best lessons I got was learning how to counter-steer... Shifting your weight way over on the seat towards the outside of a turn to make those tight turns possible. Scary and weird-feeling at first, but so does standing still, holding a 3" diameter wooden bat while someone throws a baseball at your head.

There's an old joke about Goldwing owners: "what's the first thing a Goldwing owner does when they tip their bike over?" Answer: "they look around to see if anybody was watching them."

Enjoy the ride, because a Goldwing is like no other.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
23 Posts
I've seen some amazing things done by skilled riders. For example, You would be shocked how slow you can go and how tight a turn can be made on something as large as a Goldwing without tipping. One of the best lessons I got was learning how to counter-steer... Shifting your weight way over on the seat towards the outside of a turn to make those tight turns possible.
That's a dirt riding technique!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top