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Discussion Starter #1
I installed speed bleeders in every spot possible on my wing this morning (clutch, front and rear calipers, and anti dive valve, 8 total). The initial work of getting the clutch slave and the front brakes took the longest. Then I did it in stages,
1st replaced the clutch slave bleeder screw and flushed the system,
2nd replaced the 2 bleed screws that are operated by the hand lever, then flushed and bled at the same time
3rd replaced the 5 bleed screws that are worked with the foot brake and flushed the system

this made it soooooooooooooooooooo easy, it is now a simple one person job
put the hose over the bleed screw, clip hose in old mayo open screw, pump brake until clean fluid, close her up....done

I do believe I am going to order them for my truck and my wife's car... so I can single handed flush those two as well

I am running out of projects
 

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Yes sir, you got it right. I've added speed bleeders to nine different bikes in the last few years. It sure makes it easy to do the annual brake bleed.
 
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Did that last year on my 05 Wing and makes things so much easier. Had changed out on my Magna a few years back and thats when I first learned of them. Money well spent.
 

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Very timely discussion! I'm shopping speed bleeders myself and also have the 2013 GL1800. There are a grand total of 8 bleeders on the bike, but I'm not positive of the size bleeders I need for all 8. I'll be starting with the clutch. Is that an 8mm x 1.25? One video suggests that there are some 8mm and some 10mm bleeders on that fellows 2012. Can you help me out with my shopping list? What do I need to do replace all 8 bleeders on the bike? and which brand? and where to get them? (Edelbrock(Russel) and Amazon?)

Thanks in advance.
Norm De Plume
 

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I used the Goodridge SB8125L Speed Bleeder from Ebay to replace all the bleed screws. They are 8 x 1.25 mm threads. Russel is good too. Up to you.
Too many people will say 8 mm or 10 mm when talking about bolts and nuts and they are referring to the size of the wrench needed to loosen or tighten the hex nut or bolt head. The millimeter size that is important with these is the thread size. All the bleed screws needed are are 8 x 1.25 mm threads.
 
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Discussion Starter #6

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I saw the Goodridge units at Amazon too, and I just ordered them. Thanks for the speedy reply. I'm slowly checking off the 24k mile maintenance tasks. brakes and clutch fluid replacements are the last two on my list. What a ride...
 

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Okay, I installed speed bleeders and learned that these are problematic if you drain all the fluid from the brake and clutch lines. When it comes to refilling and air bleeding these, you can't pump the break pedal, break or clutch lever and get fluid into the lines.

I don't have a "commercially available" break bleeder pump, so tried one of those hand pump variations. There wasn't enough suction to be able to pull fluid out of the speed bleeders. Maybe the air compressor variants have more oomph, but I went with a work around. On the brake lines, I removed the upper speed bleeders from the front brake calipers and reinstalled the stock bleeders. Once those were in place, gravity took over and fluid started coming out of the stock bleeder (with clear hose attached). For the two stock bleeders, I followed the Service Manual's prescribed process for "Bleeder Not Available" to fill and bleed the air from those two points. The speed bleeders on the remaining brake lines worked like a charm from that point on. Just pump the lever or pedal and fluid works it's way into the line, and out the bleeder. No need for break bleeder pump required.

To solve the problem on the clutch bleeder, I went back to the stock bleeder and used the Motion Pro "mini bleeder" I saw demonstrated by Cruiser-man in a You-Tube video on line. It has a less fussy check valve. Fluid flows out without the need for a bleeder pump, so you can refill the line. Once the line is primed, pumping the clutch lever with the mini bleeder you can fill and bleed the clutch easily. Works like a charm.

To those of you who replaced all the stock bleeders with the speed bleeders, do you completely drain the lines, as spelled out in the Service Manual? or do you not let the reservoirs go empty and simply push new fluid through the system using the levers and pedals?
 

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Empty the reservoir, but not to the point that the bottom port is dry. Then add fresh DOT 4 and proceed with the normal bleeding process using the handle or foot peddle. I can think of no reason to comp[letely empty the lines unless you are replacing lines and or calipers and master cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a turkey baster that is permanently in my tool box
I use it to suck the old fluid out of the reservoir, then refill with fresh fluid
hook the hose to the speed bleeder, crack open the bleeder, put hose into a jar, start slowly pumping the lever or pedal (depending on which one your doing), keep an eye on reservoir and refill before empty, once you get clear new fluid from bleeder, close it and move to the next one cuz your done.

the only difficulty with the clutch bleeder is getting everything off to get to it, but works the same way.


I will be doing this the exact same way on my truck and wife's car, just they are so old I couldn't get speed bleeders, but found the a tool similar to what you found, it is just a one way valve, hook short hose to bleeder screw and then to valve, then from valve to collection container, just only have 4 to do per vehicle
 

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"I have a turkey baster that is permanently in my tool box I use it to suck the old fluid out of the reservoir, then refill with fresh fluid hook the hose to the speed bleeder, crack open the bleeder, put hose into a jar, start slowly pumping the lever or pedal (depending on which one your doing), keep an eye on reservoir and refill before empty, once you get clear new fluid from bleeder, close it and move to the next one cuz your done."

In my notes for "next time", that's exact what I plan to do.

I imagine that, at that time, I'll go ahead and swap the two upper stock bleeders on the front calipers for the speed-bleeders.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I put the speed bleeders in EVERY location

I still need to do the other vehicles, just been too hot
might do it over the next week, to try and get my mind off of school starting, going to be a nightmare
 

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DSurley, Since it appears you too have the 2013 edition of the GL1800, do you know anything about the "vibration damper" in the photo below?

I have another thread going on that, but hey, it never hurts to ask. There is no reference to this in the Service Manual, and it doesn't show up on the Honda Parts Diagrams.
What is it? What does it do? Is it necessary? And if the rubber gaskets perish, how do I go about getting them?
272962
272963
 

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I put the speed bleeders in EVERY location

I still need to do the other vehicles, just been too hot
might do it over the next week, to try and get my mind off of school starting, going to be a nightmare
Sorry I derailed this thread by asking about that dog bone above. Back to the speed bleeders...

Talk about a senior moment. As I was putting away the tools from the maintenance extravaganza, I noticed a plastic cap (one of the "extras" that came with the brake bleeding tool) wedged at a critical point in that tool. It prevented me from fully depressing the lever when I was trying to increase the vacuum to suck fluid from the brake and clutch lines. Because of that oversight, I couldn't generate enough suction to draw fluid into the line and resorted to swapping back two of the OEM bleeders for the speed bleeders. (Post #8 above). I tested the bleeder pump again after removing the impediment and it worked as it should. Next time I change fluids, I'll put the speed bleeders back, and follow the Service Manual instructions to drain and refill the lines. No turkey baster necessary.

Live and learn (or is it, live too long and forget?)

All's well that ends well.

(As for that leak above the dog bone, if you're interested, you know where to find that thread. New developments there...)
 

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Definitely no reason to fully empty the reservoirs. THat's the nice thing about speed bleeders, pump some fluid out and at about half way start pouring in the new fluid. Pump it until all new (clear) fluid comes out the drain hose.
 

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Definitely no reason to fully empty the reservoirs. THat's the nice thing about speed bleeders, pump some fluid out and at about half way start pouring in the new fluid. Pump it until all new (clear) fluid comes out the drain hose.
After posting the above, I've come to your way of thinking. At the next fluid change, all of the bleeders will be speed bleeders. Since I can't store the unused fluid, I may as well flush it through the system until it's all used up.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Finally got a cool weekend not long ago and got to use this

since I couldn't get the speed bleeder screws for our old vehicles
worked great
did the same, turkey baster to get old fluid out of the reservoir, cleaned out the nasty with paper towel,
refilled and started the flush, had the Camry and Dodge 2500 done in 2 hours
and that was including pulling each wheel to inspect brakes and bleed with wheel off, (I do have air impacts for that)
took me 2 quarts of fluid, the Dodge has a massive reservoir, and the fluid was about the color
of Mrs Butterworth syrup

I still say,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, wow............. where were these things when I still turned wrenches part time
 

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I used the Goodridge SB8125L Speed Bleeder from Ebay to replace all the bleed screws. They are 8 x 1.25 mm threads. Russel is good too. Up to you.
Too many people will say 8 mm or 10 mm when talking about bolts and nuts and they are referring to the size of the wrench needed to loosen or tighten the hex nut or bolt head. The millimeter size that is important with these is the thread size. All the bleed screws needed are are 8 x 1.25 mm threads.
Thanks for clarifying, as 2 different part numbers appear for the genuine bleeders for the front calipers. The top one takes an 8mm socket / spanner and the lower one a 10mm. Only Mr. Honda will know why he uses 2 different sizes, but the 8mm ones are about half the price of the 10mm. Another thing to make speed bleeders quicker, just one spanner required.
 
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