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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I open up the atlas and look at the USA. I pick a general area where I would like to tour on the Wing. Now I'd like to have a quick and easy way to draw out some different routes and see how far it is from point to point then change the route to add or remove a long day here or there. Anybody using any kind of route planning software?
I'd be willing to buy a GPS that has the software and allows uploads if that's the best way to do this
 

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Planned my trips the old fashioned way like you. Even the one in June across the Country & back. I like the hands on approach. Used sites like this one.

http://www.motorcycleroads.us/index.html

Most of the guys have GPS's here & swear by them. I even own one, that I shipped back on my 1st UPS stop of our trip. Electronic gizmo's.:rolleyes:

My opinion on this is well defined so much so that I'm sure everyone is getting sick of it. I'm just biding my time until the year I find a bunch of Wing Riders riding in circles with a frustrated look on their face because some Electro-Tart kept telling them to turn right. Then I'll smile. & help them of course.
 

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Google maps will give you directions and from there you can alter your route and it will show the differences.
 

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My atlas and state maps work great, even show milage between towns. My GPS has been downgraded to entertainment, can't take it too seriously when too often it disputes the fact that there is a road at all--as I roll down the actual road. A current atlas and a highliter are so easy to take along.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks guys.... I am looking to plot and plan the route using software, Google Maps is a good option, and then using that info to highlight a map as suggested. If I had the GPS that allows me to up load the routes, then that's OK too. I'd always carry a map; no batteries required! I have the Wing's GPS but no upload of the routes is possible.

For me it's the combination approach. When we sail or boat across the Gulf Stream I don't just use a compass and a chart. I also use a GPS. I always have both.

Thanks again...

D
 

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For me it's the combination approach. When we sail or boat across the gulfstream I don't just use a compass and a chart. I also use a GPS. I always have both.

Thanks again...

D
Yep, it's a tool and usually a pretty good one. I mostly use it as a rolling map to keep up with the map in my head. I use Google map to figure out options dragging the route different ways and looking for interesting roads. But I've always got the paper maps to fall back on.
 

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When I get to the USA, I will be using a gps unit as well as maps. As I have never had a gps on my bike but wished that I did. Lets go back a couple of years ago when my eldest daughter had her march outwith her graduation from the Air Force Officer training. I went by bike, and as luck would have it. It rained and it rained and it rained. You got the picture and to cap it off my rear wheel bearing went west on the first day. So on the second day before we could leave, a new bearing had to be fitted. This put me 5 hour down and meant I was riding at night on roads I didn't know. Did I tell you it was raining. That made it difficult to read maps. First you had to find shelter and shelter with light to read your map. Who knows where I went because I don't know. I had a holiday that I didn't want and I don't give up easily. But I was getting close to throwing the towel in. Now if I had a gps and it took me an extra 50 miles to get there I would have been happy. I still would have been wet but it would have been a lot less frustrating. Just point me in the right direction and I will be happy. Later on I will have a laugh about it, thanks Fossil92 lol Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mark,

Now that I think about it, that's what I do. I look at the atlas and some maps and I get the route in my head, I then use the GPS as rolling map to confirm what I have in my memory. If I have a 'discrepancy' I'll pull over and look at the map and the GPS and find out where I am confused or use the map, or print outs from my route planning software, (or GPS) to get back on track.

I have never owned a GPS that allowed me to upload my route(s) to the GPS but I'd consider it.
 

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Mark,

Now that I think about it, that's what I do. I look at the atlas and some maps and I get the route in my head, I then use the GPS as rolling map to confirm what I have in my memory. If I have a 'discrepancy' I'll pull over and look at the map and the GPS and find out where I am confused or use the map, or print outs from my route planning software, (or GPS) to get back on track.

I have never owned a GPS that allowed me to upload my route(s) to the GPS but I'd consider it.
I agree with your assessment. I have a gps that is motorcycle friendly, i.e., it gives the most direct route but keeps you off the highways as much as possible. The gps is a good stress reducer and time saver. I keep up with my route in my head and I know where which direction I should be going relative to the sun but on cloudy days or at night, it is also a compass. In unfamiliar road splits and cities, it is invaluable to get a 1 mile notice to "get in the right lane" and "turn left and then make an immediate right".
 

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One thing I really like about Garmin's Mapsource is that you can save the route you plan out and email it to a friend that will ride with you. That shares the planning workload and puts you both "on the same map." The Zumo series motorcycle GPSs are expensive (too expensive) but you can't beat it if you plan to take trips. I am still discovering neat things it can do for you (like keep a breadcrumbs trail of where you go). I took mine to the Smokies/Appalachians this fall and had all 6 days planned out before I pulled out of the driveway. Then I could enjoy the ride more and not worry about where I was. Of course, I had paper maps too as a backup. It really does take riding to a new level.
 

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Just remember, it's NOT the computer software that determines whether or not you can download routes to your GPS. It's the GPS, itself. Damned few models actually allow this helpful process. And not ALL models of any one brand allow it. Some (a few) Garmins do... most don't. It's even more limited in other brands.
 
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