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Discussion Starter #1
Took My 95 Aspy in for Pa state inspection. It passed but rear pads are geting close. I've decided to replace them all. I've read the shop manual and think I can handle it. Seems like the worst part might be getting to the rear ones. Any advise or tips that would help? Also any advantage with oem pads compared to aftermarket.
 

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I would stick with the OEM pads, they work and last a better than the after market ones I have heard of.
 

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I agree with joe...stick with OEM pads.....I made the mistake of ordering the non OEM ones for mine and when I was ready to install them I found out they would not work....had to order OEM from a place I knew would be the right ones.

As for the rear brakes..I found it is easier to remove the left saddle bag completely to get to the caliper better. Not too bad of a job just time consuming.
 

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seat, left side cover lower trim piece under the trunk, lower left turn signal assembly, left saddlebag. disconnect the cable that opens the bag first. like bamaegle said not hard but time consuming
 

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If this is your first time, it may be a little strange getting to the rear pads.
But if you are going to change fluids, tires, pads etc. now is a good time to do it so it isn't a big deal. Do it one time and it's not hard at all. Actually changing out the pads is about the easiest thing to do.

If you have experience then maybe this is enough for you. If you are unsure, I would seriously invest in a service manual and a powersports illustrated DVD. I watch the DVD the night before and then I can go out and just do it the next day. They are good and step by step. They also give some good advise on what to do while you have this apart. I have a 95 and went thru this too. I got good pointers on rebuilding a brake cylinder and checking out and maintaining the anti-dive mechanism. Also, if it hasn't been done, it's a good time to change the final drive oil.

I know that is off track but once you get the saddlebag off and the back pieces you will want to do it all while you are there. The cost is minimal -good luck.

I agree with oem brakes. lots of good choices but as I am not an expert on them, I lean on Honda's expertise for this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. I've read Clymers manual over and over. Ordered oem pads. I was planing removing left bag as described in manual. This is first attempt on goldwing but have done on other bikes and cars.I had a shop do rear brakes on my 87 interstate awhile back and can't remember exact price but it shocking:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
just to follow up installed all three pad sets today. As stated above it was fairly easy to install pads but removing and installing all the tupperware was the worst. Aprox. 1/2 hour for pads 3 hours saddlebags ect. I can almost justify what shops charge ALMOST Now If I just get enough nerve to try those timming belts.:)
 

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Great job. search timing belts in window. There are a couple of links that give step by step.

These are not any worse to do than what you just did and about the same amount of time.

feels pretty good to get acquainted with your machine don't it?
 

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When I had my 1500, I changed my pads a couple of times. I found the Honda dealer kept wanting to sell me pads for a Valkarye instead of my Aspencade and they are different. I got to the point of taking the old pad to the dealer with me so I could compare old vs. new instead of making another trip to exchange them. FWIW
 
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