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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I recently picked up a '76 gl1000 and was told by the previous owner that the rear master cylinder needs to be replaced. I was wondering if anyone could give me some insight as to what I'm looking at for cost/time/difficulty. I am not the most mechanically inclined person on the planet, but have a very basic knowledge. Any help would be appreciated. Also, there seems to be a slight studder in the steering during turning. I'm thinking it's the steering bearings, but not to sure.

Thanks!
 

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Thank you for the help, but does anyone know the answer to my question about general time consumption and difficulty or the repair?

Thanks!
 

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welcome jake, I've never done any brake work on any of my bikes. If no-one chimes in with the info, you could try calling a dealer and ask if they have a shop flat rate listing for the work. That will at least be ball-park info.
 

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Hey there, if it's anything like the MC on my '76 750F, it's really simple to take apart and rebuild. Since they're simple little things in the first place, it's just a matter of keeping the parts that come out in PROPER ORIENTATION and PROPER SEQUENCE of assembly (take some CLOSE-UP pictures of the parts all laid out for future reference). After that, it's a matter of cleaning everything really well and inspecting. If you find a lot of red-colored rusty gunk in there, you'll probably have water infiltration issues and rusty parts too. The main plunger rod is supposed to have a rubber boot around it to keep the water out, but I've found that they only keep the water IN, and cause rust to form. When I bought a new boot, I notched a tiny hole in the bottom of the boot to allow water to drain out, and never a problem after that. Everything is held into the bore with a "circlip", a circular shaped spring clip and is sometimes a bear to remove from the groove, (a dental pick tool helps here) and you'll most likely tear-up the boot getting it out of the groove. A rebuild kit contains the new cup, end seal, and (I think) a new spring. Check the bore really carefuly for deep scratching on the wall, if that looks good, you're good to go. If there's scratches or severe pitting from the moisture, start looking for a new MC, since honing is not an option on die-cast master cylinders:mad: Make sure that the really small bleed hole that returns fluid to the reservior cup is clear of debris and obstrucions, and re-assemble using clean brake fluid or brake assembly lube (if you can find it, I wasn't able to). A little dab of white lithium grease on the metal-to-metal contact points of the actuator rod and the lever parts is helpful.
If your brake line is still the rubber type and is showing any kind of cracks, now is the time to replace it, consider braided stainless steel line (highly recommended). If your rear caliper doesn't have a SPEED BLEEDER, i would get one, makes the bleeding job lots easier.

L8r
Steve F
 

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I have never had a 1000, but on my 1500 the rear master cylinder was a pain to get to...(had to remove one side of the exhaust and the collector box) once I got to it it was easy to remove and rebuild like Steve said above.
 
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