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I just picked up a new spare rear wheel for my '09. I got it on e-bay from a seller by the name of mehonda. Really great guy to deal with and worked with me to get the deal done. Had an issue getting the shipping to calculate into the total price and he got it fixed from his end. One more item on the list ticked off. Got the wheel, tyre complete with the TPMS for $400 + shipping. Not bad since a flipping tyre is almost $200. Solved my dilema about what brand of tyre to buy, at least for now. Going to install centramatics when I do the swap.
 

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Finding one with the TPMS is tough. Lots of them out there for sale from trikes but not with TPMS. Hold on to that one. I"m still debating on getting a second rear wheel for my 09. Just have to keep looking for a good deal..
 

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Bill said in one of his messages that he has more wheels for sale in his e-bay store, he likely has one without the TPMS
 

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I think you can get them for a lot less than $400.00. A lot of 09 & 10's are being triked. Now you do know that you just cannot put that wheel on the bike and expecxt the TPMS to work don't you. either take it to the dealer and have the register it to the bikes brain or you can do thios.
After several months of battles trying to find a way to activate and register the tire pressure sensors on the 2009 Wing, I believe I have finally had success.

I bought the ATEQ VT10 TPMS tool from Tire Rack for $107. This is similar to the tool the Honda dealers use, except that it doesn't provide feedback on the sensor data. It just has two push buttons and a green LED on it.

http://www.tirerack.com/accessories/detail.jsp?ID=111

I had to call ATEQ and get some tech assist from them, as it didn't want to work the first time. They informed me of an undocumented issue with the LDL sensors in the Wing that isn't in the service manual. You have to inflate the tires to about 52psi or more and let them sit for a couple minutes to put them into the "Test Mode" before you can use the tool to activate them. Apparently they discovered this at the plant in Marysville. The manual mentions nothing about putting them into the test mode before using the tool, but I verified that it won't work unless you do.

The rest of the procedure in the service manual is good. You turn on the key, short two pins in a connector under the seat (I installed a shorting switch to make it easier). Then you activate the front sensor with the tool and watch the TPMS light. When it gets the code, it begins to blink at which time you do the rear. When you do the rear, it changes blink rates for about 10 seconds and then goes solid. Once the light goes solid, you remove the short on the connector pins and turn off the key and the new sensor ID's should be stored.

If the front tire sensor code is not received after 1 minute, the TPMS light will start to flash indicating it is now expecting the rear. It will continue to flash for another minute looking for the rear sensor code. At then end of one minute it will go solid. If no codes were received, the existing sensor codes in the receiver will not be erased or overwritten. They only get overwritten if new valid codes are received. One way you can easily tell if the code for a sensor was received, is that the blink cycle will change before it hits the 1 minute mark, since once it receives a valid code it acknowledges it by changing the TPMS light blink rate. It is helpful to have a watch with a second hand that you can monitor. Once I put the sensors in the "Test Mode" I was able to get an acknowledgment ouf of the TPMS dash light after holding the button on the VT10 tool for about 15 seconds or so. If you hit the one minute mark with no acknowledgment, then it didn't work.

When you use the tool, you have to HOLD DOWN on the LEFT button until you get the blink indicator on the TPMS light before you let go. This may require using a helper, since the tool needs to be right at the sensor location on the tire.


There is also a verification process in the manual you can use to check that they worked. You short the connector with the key off, turn on the key, and both the TPMS light and LOW TIRE PRESSURE light come on and stay on. You then ride the bike. When it sees a transmission from the front tire the Low Tire Pressure light goes out and when the rear tire sensor is read, the TPMS light goes off. Then you remove the short and turn off the key. If both lights went out, your sensors are both working and registered properly.

Also, when you put the sensors in the test mode, they will transmit every 20 seconds. You need to take them out of this mode when you are done so you don't wear out their batteries. The way to return them to the normal mode is to ride the bike over 10mph for at least 4 minutes. You should do this before you park the bike and leave it so that the sensors can go back to sleep and save the batteries when parked.

Why did I go to all this trouble? I dunno, I guess cause I am stubborn and I didn't want to loose the ability to have a second set of spare 2009 wheels that I could easily swap out and still have a working TPMS system. Was it worth it? Maybe. Time will tell. At least now I can hot swap wheels and tires and program the wheel sensors when I do.






http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Hond...8176171QQptZMotorcyclesQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories
 

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Good information Joe. I've gone over the procedures in the service manual, and you've supplemented it for me. I have an advantage by being able to contact my guru at Honda to streamline the procedure, plus I can access the proper tools right here at the shop. As usual, it's more than just a simple wheel swap, and following the steps is time consuming but pretty straight forward. The biggest thing I think, is making sure you get the TPMS reciever and sensors in the correct mode after completion to save the batteries.
 

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The plot thickens. The TPMS tester unit (p/n AEQVT55) is only available in the States (?). There is a DES unit that Honda recommends that is made by Bartec and is available here. I've also contacted the dealer that I purchased the wheel from to see if they can get me one of the original units so I'll see which is more affordable. Joe, thereare lots of rear rims and full assemblies out there, but this was the best price (including shipping to Canada) for one with the unused tyre, and the TPMS sensor included. Non TPMS wheels were about half the price, but after using the parts fische, the sensor and associated valve stem etc are a horrible price from Honda.
 
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