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Discussion Starter #1
I got a super deal on a 1980 GL1100 a few days ago. For the price I paid I did not expect a bike in "new" condition....it needs tires, battery, and a fix on a sticking right front brake caliper, but overall it is in great shape for a bike its age. 72K miles. My question is this:
How the heck do I remove the seat? This is my 13th motorcycle, and all of them have had easily accessible seat latches.
I can't locate this one to save my life, and it's frustrating. Arrrrrrgh!
Also, I have a shop manual on the way, but does the bike have a
master idle set screw. I quickly discovered that changing the setting of the #4 carb idle screw was not a good idea.......that set off some
banging and detonation on the #1 and #3 bank. The engine idles at
about 1500 rpm, smooth, but too fast. The throttle cables have slack, so I don't think that is the source of the high idle speed. Any suggestions welcome. Once I have a repair manual, I think I can deal
with most basic tuneup work.
Thanks,
CW
 

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there should be a bolt on sideof the seat that locks the seat down
 

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Remove the lids from the two side trunks. Lift up the middle of the rubber seals on the seat sides and you will see access to hex bolts. The bolt with the little contraption on it is bigger than the other side. The contraption allows you to move the seat forward or backwards a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, guys. I just didn't want to go taking things apart without knowing what would
happen. I spent most of yesterday applying 1/8" automotive pin striping to help the
"plain Jane" look left when a former owner repainted the bike in Dallas Cowboys blue. The paint job is far from professional, but it will do for now. The pinstriping is silver and actually gives the bike a nice look. When said former owner repainted the bike and fairing, he removed all the medallions and naturally did not put them back on. I'm thinking of filling the mounting holes with epoxy putty, sanding that down, and spot painting the epoxy to match (closely as possible) the blue paint. We have a local sign shop that can make almost any style and size of vinyl lettering you can want, and that
will be a lot less costly than buying a full set of OEM plastic medallions. Will keep you guys up to speed on how this project goes. BTW....do any of you have problems finding a Honda shop that will work on older Wings? The ones in southwest Missouri are eager to take in the 1500 and 1800 bikes, but won't touch anything older than that. It doesn't speak well for Honda's relationship with owners. I finally found a professional shop with a Gold certified mechanic that is going to get things back to specs this week, but
I am truly disappointed in the attitude of the big Honda dealers around here.
CW
 

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Regarding the Honda dealers' servicing policy - pretend you're a Honda dealer and have to answer the following questions when making business decisions: "where the heck do I store all these new parts when I have to keep all the parts for 1100's too? And when I hire new mechanics, because the good 1100 and 1200 cc mechanics retire, how can I train the new ones for the 1100's and 1200's when the factory only supports me in training for the 1800s?". I have an 1100 also. I get my parts from recyclers and have found an independent repair shop that knows 1100's. A bonus: the hourly rate is less than at the dealers. There is always a silver lining in the cloud. Enjoy the ride!
 

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I had the same problem with the dealers in my area, would not work on my 85 limited edition. finally found a shop that would and he does a great job. I also have a warehouse near me that is full of old parts at reasonable prices.
 

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Honda Corp like any other new bike/ car dealer cant sell new bikes if the old one are still on the road. They don't want you to fix old bikes. But there are a few goldwing suppliers out there still making parts for older bikes. Ebay is a one place I buy a lot from. And when you find someone that will work on your old bike, help him stay in business buy telling all your friends about him. Old wing mechanic or getting hard to come by.
 

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Try a search for motorcycle paint, you will find: http://www.cyclecolor.com - They have OEM formulas for just about any age motorcycle. touch up 2 ounce bottles with a brush in the cap. Also, they can supply pints, quarts, and complete repair and refinishing kits.
Jackpiner
 
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