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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

Can you please confirm my assumptions below or explain if and where I am incorrect?

So linked brakes... I apply front brake alone and get both front and rear brakes applied. I apply rear break alone and I get both front and rear brakes applied. Is the breaking applied 50/50?

ABS... assuming there is no wheel about to skid or slip, the ABS will not affect the amount (percentage) of braking applied to either wheel?

Thank you!
 

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It is not 50/50-can't remember the split right now. There is a proportioning valve in the system that does the splitting of the force.
The ABS does not alter this percentage Per Si, it does prevent either wheel from "locking up" during extreme braking.
 

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I don't know specifically but I have heard that if you hit the rear brake, it will activate half the pistons on the front caliper and vise versa if you use the rear brake.

As far as the ABS goes, I can tell you that I have tested it both solo and two up from 60 mph to 0. I stabbed both brakes hard as I could and you can not lock up those wheels on a dry road!
First time I tried it, I lost a small chunk of the seat where my butthole puckered and ripped off a piece of vinyl!:eek:
 

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The linked system actually operates th outer two pistons on each of the front calipers along with the inner single piston on the rear caliper when you squeeze the lever. The brake pedal activates the two outer pistons on the rear and the inner piston on each front. The brake ECU and the proportioning valve handles the hydraulic pressure and the balance of braking power front to rear in conjunction with the ABS.
 

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I don't know specifically but I have heard that if you hit the rear brake, it will activate half the pistons on the front caliper and vise versa if you use the rear brake.

As far as the ABS goes, I can tell you that I have tested it both solo and two up from 60 mph to 0. I stabbed both brakes hard as I could and you can not lock up those wheels on a dry road!
First time I tried it, I lost a small chunk of the seat where my butthole puckered and ripped off a piece of vinyl!:eek:
Way to go buzzy! Personal sacrifice saves many other . Hope that was not your Ultimate Seat.
 

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Way to go buzzy! Personal sacrifice saves many other . Hope that was not your Ultimate Seat.
I haven't ordered the Ultimate yet..........lol. And that test was last year.
My favorite test is the "Wife Test". This is something we agreed on when she started riding with me. I explained that she needed to always be alert and know what to do in a panic stop situation and that I would randomly test her at any given moment at least once on a ride.

I'll see if I can get some pictures of the back of my helmet showing the contact scars from her head!:D
 

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I haven't ordered the Ultimate yet..........lol. And that test was last year.
My favorite test is the "Wife Test". This is something we agreed on when she started riding with me. I explained that she needed to always be alert and know what to do in a panic stop situation and that I would randomly test her at any given moment at least once on a ride.

I'll see if I can get some pictures of the back of my helmet showing the contact scars from her head!:D
Never gone through " dry runs " with Mz. Vickie. Trust me, we don't practice disaster events with Mz. Vickie. It's a great day and everything will be fine, dear......
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So according to the diagrams provided by Chopin when the footbrake is applied you get 3 pistons on the front wheel and 3 pistons on the rear wheel actuated. When the hand brake is applied you get 3 front pistons actuated and 2 rear pistons actuated. It seems obvious but I'll ask anyway. Is this the correct interpretation of the diagrams? If so, this differs from Budoka's explanation.
 

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The diagrams are correct.
Also, might check on the comment about ABS system altering the percentage of front vs rear brakes. IMHO, the only thing the ABS does is keep the tires from "locking up"???
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everybody... I was asked recently about the Wing's brakes and although I could provide the correct answer I couldn't give much detail on the 'linked' portion. As for the ABS, well I figured that 'Anti-lock' says it all but was second guessing myself.
 

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First time I tried it, I lost a small chunk of the seat where my butthole puckered and ripped off a piece of vinyl!:eek:
now I have that mental image to deal with. :eek: :eek:

Thanks a ton, Buzzy!
 

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Ouch !!!! Did I say OUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Braking percentages

As a retired MSF instructor, I learned that brakes during a stop are 70% front and 30% rear on average. I am not sure what the GL1800 linked system percentages are, but I would guess close to these above figures.:United_States:
 

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I'm glad that Lee corrected my error on the link-up of the pistons, calipers and control actuation, even if it was several years past. Talon, I don't believe Honda has ever released an actual breakdown of the braking forces as a percentage split/ratio front to back. The reason for this is the proportioning valve does regulate how much braking force is applied where in conjunction with the ABS system so as to maximize braking force without causing lock up when the full system is in play. Yes the ABS does still function regardless but braking power is reduced with just one control in operation. The Linked/Combined system is meant to be utilized with both controls rather than just the lever or the pedal to achieve maximum stopping force.
 

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My order of complete brakes came in from WingStuff the other day . Early this evening I decided to start with the rear pads first. My last pad change was about 25,000 miles ago. I removed the rear pads and they looked new, although I did not gauge the depth. Bummer. Put in the new pads anyway. Eye checked the front right pads. Look thick. Eye checked the left front pads. Very thin. Ah Ha ! The left front are worn twice as much as the others . It appears my left front is doing 80% of my stopping whether I use the front brake lever or not . Strange .
 

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My order of complete brakes came in from WingStuff the other day . Early this evening I decided to start with the rear pads first. My last pad change was about 25,000 miles ago. I removed the rear pads and they looked new, although I did not gauge the depth. Bummer. Put in the new pads anyway. Eye checked the front right pads. Look thick. Eye checked the left front pads. Very thin. Ah Ha ! The left front are worn twice as much as the others . It appears my left front is doing 80% of my stopping whether I use the front brake lever or not . Strange .
Very strange in deed, I guess my question is.... what brakes do you use?? I'm coming from a sportbike and still use the front most of the time,both when I need to stop quicker.
 

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Very strange in deed, I guess my question is.... what brakes do you use?? I'm coming from a sportbike and still use the front most of the time,both when I need to stop quicker.

I'm a back braker rider with a hint of front brake lever . Pretty conservative. Here's a picture of one of the left front pads compared to a rear pad. All the pads were replaced at the same time . ImageUploadedByMotorcycle1428786663.683633.jpg
 

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My order of complete brakes came in from WingStuff the other day . Early this evening I decided to start with the rear pads first. My last pad change was about 25,000 miles ago. I removed the rear pads and they looked new, although I did not gauge the depth. Bummer. Put in the new pads anyway. Eye checked the front right pads. Look thick. Eye checked the left front pads. Very thin. Ah Ha ! The left front are worn twice as much as the others . It appears my left front is doing 80% of my stopping whether I use the front brake lever or not . Strange .
I'm a back braker rider with a hint of front brake lever . Pretty conservative. Here's a picture of one of the left front pads compared to a rear pad. All the pads were replaced at the same time . View attachment 126314
Unless I'm mistaken, that makes sense. You mostly use the rear brake, which activates 2 pistons of the left front. When slowing down weight shifts forward putting most of the required braking force on the front wheel so that front left wears quicker than the rear.

 
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