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1984 GL1200I
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got an 84 1200 interstate with 97000miles and a dead stator leg. I'm trying to decide the best option to repair/upgrade the charging system. I have read many post here and on other forums but they all seem several years old. I have a few questions and any help would be greatly appreciated.

1. Is there anyone here that has a poor boy conversion if so how do you like it for the long term?
2. Is there a source for the crank pulley? Does anyone make a kit if not I am confident I can fabricate the brackets and spacers needed for mounting and do the install.
3. Are the stator repair parts found on the internet any better than the original?
4. To anyone that has replaced the stator have you had any problems in the long term?
I have to do one or the other and just hate the idea of putting a ticking time bomb back in that can go off at any time and leave me stranded. Thanks for the help, recommendations, opinions etc in advance.
 

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Hopefully some of the members that have done the conversion will chime in. The Poorboy kit is no longer manufactured, but I believe there is somebody making the pulleys I know one of our members replaced the stator, only to have to replace it a short time later. .
 

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i had an '84 Aspencade but folks were saying the stator didn't have enough power for extra lights and heated gear so when the stator stopped working i ordered a poor boy kit and a friend installed it for me. i rode the 1200 for a total of six trouble free months before giving it to my niece. i had heard of others that had replaced their stator only to have it go out a short time later and that wasn't going to be me or my niece
 
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1984 GL1200I
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i had an '84 Aspencade but folks were saying the stator didn't have enough power for extra lights and heated gear so when the stator stopped working i ordered a poor boy kit and a friend installed it for me. i rode the 1200 for a total of six trouble free months before giving it to my niece. i had heard of others that had replaced their stator only to have it go out a short time later and that wasn't going to be me or my niece
When you did the conversion how did you disconnect the stator from the bike wiring. Did you just unplug the regulator/rectifier?
 

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When you did the conversion how did you disconnect the stator from the bike wiring. Did you just unplug the regulator/rectifier?
i know nothing about the installation, junkyard John did the install for me
 

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I am going to be doing a DIY Poorboy conversion on a friend's 1200 this coming spring, once the weather warms up a bit. I did do some research on it and you can see what I found in another thread. But be aware that I have not yet done such a conversion, thus will be learning some of the details as I go. Please keep this in mind when reviewing the part numbers that are posted. On the same token, please post some details to that thread if you learn anything that might be valuable. The idea is to create a thread with definitive information that can be used reliably by others in the future. Click here to go to that thread.
 

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When you did the conversion how did you disconnect the stator from the bike wiring. Did you just unplug the regulator/rectifier?
The stator only needs to be unplugged from the rest of the electrical system and tape off the connector on the stator side. If the stator wiring had been repaired by removing the quick connector and soldering the four wires together in the past, simply cut the three wires going to the three legs of the stator and tape them off in a secure manner. The remaining stator leads that go to the rectifier should be removed completely.

The original regulator and rectifier must be removed from the bike altogether as they will not work with an automotive alternator. The alternator that you install will have an internal rectifier and will most likely also have an internal regulator, especially if you go with one of the Denso mini-alternators listed in the other thread listed above. Connect the BAT terminal on the alternator to your battery, preferably through a fuse large enough to protect the circuit. For a 50A alternator, a 60A fuse should be big enough. Make sure to use at least 10 gauge wire to connect the alternator to the battery, but 8 gauge would be better and would be my preferred size.

There will also be a T shaped connection port with two pins on the back of the alternator, looking something like this:

-- |

The vertical pin may have a number 2 near it. Whether it does or not, this pin needs to receive 12 volts in order for the alternator to work. You can run a wire from it to a switched ignition source (preferred) or you can simply run a jumper from the BAT terminal to the #2 pin.

I hope you find this helpful!
 

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1984 GL1200I
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The stator only needs to be unplugged from the rest of the electrical system and tape off the connector on the stator side. If the stator wiring had been repaired by removing the quick connector and soldering the four wires together in the past, simply cut the three wires going to the three legs of the stator and tape them off in a secure manner. The remaining stator leads that go to the rectifier should be removed completely.

The original regulator and rectifier must be removed from the bike altogether as they will not work with an automotive alternator. The alternator that you install will have an internal rectifier and will most likely also have an internal regulator, especially if you go with one of the Denso mini-alternators listed in the other thread listed above. Connect the BAT terminal on the alternator to your battery, preferably through a fuse large enough to protect the circuit. For a 50A alternator, a 60A fuse should be big enough. Make sure to use at least 10 gauge wire to connect the alternator to the battery, but 8 gauge would be better and would be my preferred size.

There will also be a T shaped connection port with two pins on the back of the alternator, looking something like this:

-- |

The vertical pin may have a number 2 near it. Whether it does or not, this pin needs to receive 12 volts in order for the alternator to work. You can run a wire from it to a switched ignition source (preferred) or you can simply run a jumper from the BAT terminal to the #2 pin.

I hope you find this helpful!
Thank you very much for the info it is very helpful
 

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1984 Goldwing GL1200 homemade Poor Boy alternator conversion



May also want to look at :GL1200 GOLDWINGS,
823Jim, i really appreciate the video, sir. The information was needed.
What i had a real problem with was the language. if it weren't for the S bombs, MF bombs and F bombs in almost every sentence, it would have been sooo much more pleasant to listen to. It's just so unnecessary.
Sorry about the rant. it's just a pet peeve.
 

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823Jim, i really appreciate the video, sir. The information was needed.
What i had a real problem with was the language. if it weren't for the S bombs, MF bombs and F bombs in almost every sentence, it would have been sooo much more pleasant to listen to. It's just so unnecessary.
Sorry about the rant. it's just a pet peeve.
Sorry about that, I didn't even listen to the thing just watched with sound off. Didn't realize it was profanity ridden.
 

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Sorry about that, I didn't even listen to the thing just watched with sound off. Didn't realize it was profanity ridden.
Apology accepted. I understand, sir. There was a time in my life when I couldn't finish a sentence without it.
Then, in Summer of 1972, I prayed and received Jesus into my life. I still can hear my reply to Him, "Lord, I want to be your man, doing whatever You want me to do, wherever You want me to do it." That commitment still stands firm in my heart, today, and has sustained me in the Gospel ministry for 50 years. It has carried me over half this great country and two foreign countries.
Has anything like that ever happened to you, Jim?
If you would like to talk about it more, send me a PM for my email address.
Be blessed, DT
 

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I've got an 84 1200 interstate with 97000miles and a dead stator leg. I'm trying to decide the best option to repair/upgrade the charging system. I have read many post here and on other forums but they all seem several years old. I have a few questions and any help would be greatly appreciated.

1. Is there anyone here that has a poor boy conversion if so how do you like it for the long term?
2. Is there a source for the crank pulley? Does anyone make a kit if not I am confident I can fabricate the brackets and spacers needed for mounting and do the install.
3. Are the stator repair parts found on the internet any better than the original?
4. To anyone that has replaced the stator have you had any problems in the long term?
I have to do one or the other and just hate the idea of putting a ticking time bomb back in that can go off at any time and leave me stranded. Thanks for the help, recommendations, opinions etc in advance.
Can any body help me with a source, e mail address, for the Poor Boy Stator kit it's for a 1984 1200. Realy only need the pully....
 
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