Honda Goldwing Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1982 gl1100a that is an awesome bike but when I ride on the interstate at about 80+ my bike will over heat no matter what. Riding in town or on the highway at 5 mph to 70mph I will sit at normal operating temp even in 90+ degree weather. Only on the interstate it over heats. Anyone have any ideas as what could be the problem? Could it be thermostat? Waterpump? Any help would be very appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
let me ask you this, just from old experience dealing with farmers trucks,
are you sure there IS a thermostat, for if there is not one, the higher the rpm the faster the water moves with out the t-stat to keep the temp constant, that the water actually starts to flow through the radiator faster than it can cool the water and gradually overheats, but at as you stated at the slower speeds the water is flowing slow enough to let it cool the water

dealing with farmers, they would think if it was running hot, take out the t-stat and it will run cooler, but it usually works the other way around.

just a thought
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
or, has the wiring been messed with to the fan and it spins in the wrong direction, and at fast speed the fan and your speed match so zero air is passing through the rad
 
  • Like
Reactions: GLblinded

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,599 Posts
Could be a collapsing radiator hose or a plugged radiator. Both have been known to cause overheating issues at highway speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
In my engineertastic mind, the radiator is removing heat at a set rate from a flowing fluid within, and it will remove the same number of BTUs per second at a given temperature differential, regardless of the speed of the fluid within it.

If the fluid is moving that quickly in the radiator, it is probably moving that quickly in the engine.

Therefore, it won't have time to pick up as much heat from the engine to begin with, which makes up for not having time to lose much heat to end with.

It's a wash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
I agree with your first statement tamathumper
second one has a little more to go with it....... the water moves slower over the surfaces inside the engine for it has a much larger volume and more surface area........ so it will pick up more heat over time than the radiator can loose....
so heat continuously builds
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I will look to see if it has a thermostat. Thanks for the help guys!! I have tomorrow off and I will look into what all was said here!! I really appreciate it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
now...................... it could simply be that the thermostat is stuck, it could be stuck open(can cause the same problem as no thermostat, but not usually, usually just causes a long warm up time), closed (but that would make it get instantly hot), or partially open(so it works okay up to a point).

there is a way to test a thermostat using a pot of water, candy thermometer, and your cook stove
just remember anti-freeze is highly toxic, so if you do this don't use some pot you will EVER cook with again and buy a candy thermometer and the keep it in your tool box

you just need the operating temp of the thermostat: that tells you the temp it should be full open
you need to be able to suspend the t-stat from a wire or something in the middle of the water
start heating it watching both the thermostat and the thermometer, it should start to slowly open as it reaches the operating temp then you can turn off the heat and drop in a cube or two of ice and watch it close as the temp drops

the operating temp is usually stamped in the the t-stat itself somewhere
 
  • Like
Reactions: Barry Dupler

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
Sounds like the OP said that you may have a hose collapsing at speed, check all your hoses and see if one feels softer than the others. Also have your pressure cap checked, if your cap doesn't maintain pressure than your coolant can cavitate in the pump and not cool the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I have a 1982 gl1100a that is an awesome bike but when I ride on the interstate at about 80+ my bike will over heat no matter what. Riding in town or on the highway at 5 mph to 70mph I will sit at normal operating temp even in 90+ degree weather. Only on the interstate it over heats. Anyone have any ideas as what could be the problem? Could it be thermostat? Waterpump? Any help would be very appreciated!
When you say, ‘overheat’, do you mean that it will lose coolant? Out the overflow? If so, then yes, you are overheating, but if it is only moving the gauge needle up higher. It is not overheating. Some cooling system designs do not cool there best at high speeds like you reference above. My GL650 silverwing is like that. We add air scoops to them to increase airflow over the radiator to manage cooling airflow. Do you have any aftermarket covers over your radiator? Like a chrome grill, something that might restrict airflow?
Otherwise, pull the radiator and soak it in hydrogen peroxide to clean the OUTSIDES of them. My GL1800 airflow design collects matter that doesn’t wash out with just a garden hose. And I did this to restore exchange of heat.
Any mineral deposits inside the cooling system? A residue on the walls of the cooling system can defeat the transfer of heat from the engine to the coolant. A finger whip will let you know you have the affliction. Sometimes a coolant flush chemical will get it out, sometimes not.
And you can check your hoses when you have the radiator off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
58 Posts
If the above doesn’t work - check the exhaust. A clogged exhaust will create back pressure at higher speeds and cause overheating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
760 Posts
Hey Dax - How long have you owned your bike and did it cool fine previously ? The other member suggestions for things to check are right on target. If everything else is found to be OK, one other suggestion is to check the condition of the water pump impeller. Honda used a Plastic looking impeller (Bakalite Material) originally on some of the early 4 cylinder bikes which may have deteriorate after 40 years. The updated water pumps all had metal impellers.

Good Luck - Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
A lot of work to check every thing and i had a 85 do the same thing and it was all good but it would not get dangerous hot but would run a little past the half mark when running over 80 for extended periods ,, just follow the advice check the thermostat flush the engine and radiator while it is out water should go through the radiator as fast as a water hose put out ,,
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top