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Hello just purchased a very nice 1992 GL1500SE, with 100620 miles. battery and tires recently etc..., bike has been maintained pretty good, new timming belts done at 70,000

Just wondering if I go with synthetic oil , as I don't know what oil type previous owner used, do you think bike will be ok with syn? or should I stick with dyno?
Thanks for any info, appreciated, new to goldwing, just came off a yamaha stratoliner and roadstar.
 

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I had a 98 GL1500 SE and ran Honda synthetic blend. Worked for me. A lot of guys run full synthetic. I'm sure others will chime in here shortly with their preferrances..
 

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Thanx TWW, I am just curious since I have no idea if prior owner ran dyon or syn oil before me? Don't guees changing over to syn if dyno was used for a longtime, if the engine wil leak oil or something along those lines?
 

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I used Honda's GN4 with an OEM filter. Works for my Wing. I believe if you give the bike a 'Diet' of regular oil for many years, it may not be too happy with synthetic. That's just my thoughts on it.
 

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Hi HWYMAN,
Welcome to the Goldwing Life. You have asked a question that you will get a million answers to. Oil choice is varied and verbal.

Here is a study by an oil company that I have used in all my engines for 25 years....read it and decide for yourself....but you should be happy with almost any oil t\of today's standards....but everyone has their favorites!

Just click on this and read away!! http://www.amsoil.com/lit/g2156.pdf
:D
 

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If you put on a lot of miles than synthetic is good, if not, why spend the extra money? You should change it every 6 months even if you don't put many miles on it, I ran it in my 02 Wing but found I was changing it at time intervals instead of mileage marks due to the fact I have slowed down a lot on my local riding. Then again if the synthetic oil is good for 8 - 10,000 do you think your oil filter is good for that long????????
 

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Good point on the filter Joe. I'm using the Amsoil filters now, and I change them at every oil change which for me is twice a year. I'm thinking of a second bike which will lessen the mileage on my Wing (if the war dept will agree to a second scoot that is) and could well end up being a once a year in the fall prior to storage. If I do end up with a second bike, I'd stick with Amsoil in it too.
 

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I used Honda's GN4 with an OEM filter. Works for my Wing. I believe if you give the bike a 'Diet' of regular oil for many years, it may not be too happy with synthetic. That's just my thoughts on it.
I've heard the same caution about using synthetic in an 'older' engine, so I use Valvoline 10W40 motorcycle oil in my 1200 and my 1500 with the OEM filter.

Also, I have used Mobil 1 Racing motorcycle oil in my VTX since the 600 mile oil change.
 

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I've heard the same caution about using synthetic in an 'older' engine, so I use Valvoline 10W40 motorcycle oil in my 1200 and my 1500 with the OEM filter.

Also, I have used Mobil 1 Racing motorcycle oil in my VTX since the 600 mile oil change.
Here is the reason they warn people that when they switch from "dino" oil to synthetic oil in an older built engine that it may leak oil at first....enjoy:.....sorry it is so long....

Back in the 70's and early 80's some synthetics were not blended correctly and caused engine oil leakage in some vehicles. Basically, the problem is that synthetic base stocks do not react the same way with seals and gaskets that petroleum oils do. PAO base stocks (the most common synthetic base stocks) tend to cause seal shrinkage. If the proper additives are not used, seals will shrink when using a PAO based oil, and leakage will occur.
Fortunately, oil manufacturers learned their lesson and reformulated their oil to contain the proper additive package which condition seals and gaskets to maintain their flexibility while also maintaining proper seal swell. In fact, the reformulation in most cases provides for better seal conditioning than most petroleum oils these days. Nevertheless, there is still a possibility of leakage if making the switch to synthetic - but only under certain conditions.
On older vehicles which have been lubricated with petroleum oils, seals and gaskets can begin to dry and crack. The reason you don't actually see leaks is because petroleum oils tend to burn off and leave sludge, grime and varnish on the inside of your engine. That's simply the nature of a petroleum oil's make-up. Therefore, some of the deposits end up around your seals and gaskets which actually plugs up the gaps which would have resulted in oil leaks.
The next obvious question is, "If synthetics have those special additives, why might they cause leaks in an older engine? Why don't they correct the problem?"
The "problem" is that there are also other additives that give a synthetic oil its detergent properties. In other words, there's other stuff in high quality synthetic oil which tends to clean out the sludge and deposits left behind by petroleum oils. Once these deposits are gone, the gaps around seals and gaskets become exposed and the oil might begin to leak in these areas.
It's likely that the additives will begin to lubricate the seals causing them to become more flexible and leading to seal swell which may plug those gaps over time. However there is no way of knowing how long it may take for this to occur or if the seals are already too far gone to be salvaged. If the problem doesn't correct itself, it is likely that the seals and gaskets would have to be replaced to prevent further oil leakage.
So, to wrap up. Petroleum oils can screw up your seals and gaskets and then fill the holes deposits to cover their tracks. Synthetic oils come in and begin to clean up the place. Once it's clean, the holes might be exposed, and the oil begins to leak. After a while the synthetic may be able to help the seals and gaskets regain their composure and stop the leaks.
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Wow the same discussion a few years back when H-D released an approved synthetic and I put it in a 00 Road King with no issues. I use a synthetic in my 89 1500 with 74000 and no issues either. I switched when I got her last year and changed oil at 3000 a couple of times after the switch to be sure and get rid of all of the trash that the syn. washes out. Now I change every 5000 there's no way I'd go 8000 to 10000 between no matter how good the manufacturer thinks their oil is.
 

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Wow the same discussion a few years back when H-D released an approved synthetic and I put it in a 00 Road King with no issues. I use a synthetic in my 89 1500 with 74000 and no issues either. I switched when I got her last year and changed oil at 3000 a couple of times after the switch to be sure and get rid of all of the trash that the syn. washes out. Now I change every 5000 there's no way I'd go 8000 to 10000 between no matter how good the manufacturer thinks their oil is.

I agree 89GL, I change the oil in my 1200 and the VTX every 5k miles, even though Honda recommends 8K. Some would say it's overkill to change synthetic oil every 5k, but oil is cheaper than an engine.
 

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I have AMSOIL in my town & Country and change it and the filter ever January. During the year I just make sure it stays on the full marker. Last years millage was 18000+-.
 
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