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Discussion Starter #1
So I had a few hours last night with nothing to do, the bike needs an oil change, so I put it up on the rack, grabbed my 17mm socket, and . . . . nothing. I COULD NOT MOVE THE PLUG. Broke the socket, got another socket, couldn't move it. Finally, I got some movement, or so I thought, but it was the head of the nut starting to strip.

I don't know how I got it on there so tight. It's not the first oil chance I've done.

I just made an appointment with Honda to do the oil change, so they'll have to remove the plug, but I was just wondering if anyone has had this problem, and what, if any, is a good solution? I was thinking about drilling a whole in the plug, and then using an "easy out", but even on the lift, it's not an easy position to be in to start drilling, and I know it's not going to be soft metal. And if it's that tight, I might not even be able to get it out with an "easy out".

Any ideas, for the future?

Thanks.
 

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So I had a few hours last night with nothing to do, the bike needs an oil change, so I put it up on the rack, grabbed my 17mm socket, and . . . . nothing. I COULD NOT MOVE THE PLUG. Broke the socket, got another socket, couldn't move it. Finally, I got some movement, or so I thought, but it was the head of the nut starting to strip.



I don't know how I got it on there so tight. It's not the first oil chance I've done.



I just made an appointment with Honda to do the oil change, so they'll have to remove the plug, but I was just wondering if anyone has had this problem, and what, if any, is a good solution? I was thinking about drilling a whole in the plug, and then using an "easy out", but even on the lift, it's not an easy position to be in to start drilling, and I know it's not going to be soft metal. And if it's that tight, I might not even be able to get it out with an "easy out".



Any ideas, for the future?



Thanks.


Did you use a 6 point socket?

Steve



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I hate to ask this but are you sure you were turning the right way ?
Or is it possible it was cross threaded the last time ?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Six point socket - yes.
Turning it the right way - it's not a reverse thread, is it? So standing on the clutch side of the bike and the wrench handle pointing down, pulling the handle toward me, yup, that's lefty loosey.
I guess it could have been cross threaded last time. Unless I recover the plug from Honda after they get it out, I guess I'll never know.

RA
 

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I hope you didn't take offence at my post. It really wasn't to.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No offense taken.
bcihil, I can't be positive if I had the crush washer on it. I always put a new one on, but as old as I am, sometimes the memory could fail a little.
 

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No offense taken.
bcihil, I can't be positive if I had the crush washer on it. I always put a new one on, but as old as I am, sometimes the memory could fail a little.
No offense intended. I know what you mean about getting old. Just had another Bday. One more and 7 decades.
I found myself more than once putting something together and then finding a part laying on the floor.
Just thought that the plug may have bound to the block without the washer.
 

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A Steady Hand -

Hey liflyboy, Hopefully your drain plug wasn't cross threaded but accidents do happen. No matter the reason for shearing the head off the drain plug - all is not lost. The 1st step in it's removal requires a very precise center punch "exactly" in the middle of the remainder of the bolt. Then a small hardened drill bit is used to make a hole completely through the center of the bolt. (Oil should now be allowed to drain) This takes a steady hand and a keen eye to make sure the drill bit is held at a 90 degree angle.

At this point a series of progressively larger bits are carefully used to gradually remove the center of the broken bolt material until only a thin ring of the original thread material remains. Once there is only a small portion of the threads left an easy-out can be used to carefully back out the remainder of the bolt.

The theory of this procedure is that with the bolt's center material removed, the thread friction has now been considerably reduced. The trick is to not damage the original threads or the diameter of the oil drain hole. Just keep the RPM of the drill bits very slow and coated with a thick layer of grease to help keep metal shavings out of the crankcase. I'm not doubting the ability of your Honda dealer but you might also discuss your options with a good machinist.

Good Luck, Michael
 

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For those that are not afraid. I have helped MANY a Honda/Acura car owner save some money. TIME-SERT M14 X 1.50 Metric Drain Plug Kit #1415C.
If you look for some of the videos it is not hard to do. A shop will charge you just about what that tool costs from Amazon. Again it is not for the faint of heart but it will put brand new treads in your engine block or oil pan and be used forever.
 
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The usual issue with drain plugs is they are steel, and the drain hole in the engine block is aluminum. It may not seem like much, but the torque can not be exceeded on that bolt, 25 lb/ft max. Haven't seen any bikes with the bolts twisting off, but lots of ATVs get over-tightened by backyard wrenches and stripped threads in the holes. That is a real difficult fix that often keeps re-occurring once it happens.
Good advice on removing the shank of the bolt, be very careful and steady and you should be fine. We're fortunate to have a guy on staff that is really skilled at removing broken bolts, he's a godsend.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Fortunately, the head did not shear off. It's just kind of rounded. I'm hoping the dealer will be able to grind some flat spots on the head, and maybe grab it with an open end wrench of a slightly smaller size.

Thanks for the advice on the Easy Out method. I did this on a seat bolt with a stripped head. I wasn't exactly square going in, but fortunately, I did no damage to the female threads.

I'll let you know on Tuesday how I made out at the dealer.
 

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A pair of knipex cobra pliers can usually grab and remove.
 

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Large Hammer and Chisel

Hey liflyboy, If trying to grind some edges back on to your oil plug doesn't pan out, Vice type Grips, TIME-SERT, the Easy-Out procedure or a big A$$ hammer and chisel :) .... doesn't help to remove the drain plug - there is one other method I've used.

Since it sounds like there is plenty of the bolt head remaining above the surface of the engine case simply place a similar sized steel nut against the rounded portion and mig weld the two together. The negative electrode is connected through a pair of vice grips that is holding the new nut in place - while the positive welding rod (wire) lightly fills the new nut's interior space. Once the nut and rounded bolt head are attached and still reasonably hot (the aluminum case will have expanded more than the steel bolt) your oil drain plug should now be easily removed.

One final step in the Mig welding process is to "Remove your battery Ground cable and disconnect the ECM computer. I haven't had any stray current issues while using this procedure on six occasions but - just to be on the safe side. :)

Good Luck, Michael
 

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Lowes sells a wrench that will grab that head no matter how rounded it is. Worth the few $$ they want for it. The Honda shop may not want to take on your job. Better check with them before you make a final decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So, as promised, here's the report. Took the bike to Honda, told them the plug head was stripped, he said, "ok, then you want a new drain plug?" I said, "YEAH". Never heard any more about it! I don't know what or how, but it's fine now.

Thanks for all the advise. I'll be a lot more careful about using the 6 pointed socket, and not over-torqueing the plug.
 

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Routine Repair For Some -

Hey liflyboy - Glad everything worked out for you OK - If you don't see any dings, dents or missing chips in the engine case the dealer obviously knew what they were doing and didn't have to resort to the Big A$$ Hammer and chisel method ..... :)

Ride Safe -Michael
 

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Hey liflyboy - Glad everything worked out for you OK - If you don't see any dings, dents or missing chips in the engine case the dealer obviously knew what they were doing and didn't have to resort to the Big A$$ Hammer and chisel method ..... :)

Ride Safe -Michael
That BFH is my friend, Do not talk bad about him.
 
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