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I was a long time skeptic about putting Nitrogen in the tires. When I bought my new Harley Ultra Classic I said what the heck and had Nitrogen put in the OEM tires. I don't know if the Nitrogen contributed to the tire wear but I got 16,000 miles on the front and rear original Dunlop tires with no uneven wear. The 2-1/2 years I had the Harley I had the tech at the dealer check to see if the tires needed additional Nitrogen and they did not. In all of the years of riding I have never gotten that many miles out of a set of OEM tires. At the time it was only $8 per tire. Guess what I’m going to do to the tires on my new Goldwing?
 

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I tried it once, but having the need from time to time to add a few pounds of pressure now and then, finding a nitrogen station was too inconvenient. I am, however , maintaining a more constant psi since I replaced the stock valve stems.
 

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Racers use nitrogen all the time as it keeps the tire temps more constant once they have them up to track friendly temps. Jury's still out on whether there is any substantial benefit for us street/highway riders though. If you're happy, good on ya, that's what counts.
 

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Let us know how it works for you on your Wing. Some of the folks on the foum may be thinking about doing the same..
 

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I have a nitrogen tank in my garage I use for welding under certain flamable conditions. But the company used it for a while on their fleet trucks and there are sometimes negative effects from longtime use. Will have to get the particulars from the mechanics. One tank would last through many tires.
 

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Racers use nitrogen all the time as it keeps the tire temps more constant once they have them up to track friendly temps. Jury's still out on whether there is any substantial benefit for us street/highway riders though. If you're happy, good on ya, that's what counts.
Actually having raced I never bothered, but I will echo what Budoka has said adding a comment. In fact the biggest gain of Nitrogen is that the air pressure will not vary as with compressed air. That is really the only gain. The reason that tire temps are better is because of less expansion/contraction. Yielding more constant temps/pressure. If you have a slight leak you will still need to add product. Other than that using Nitrogen won't really have any other effect. However kikker also like Budoka said if you're happy that's great & let us know how it works on the Wing.
 

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The air you breathe is 78% Nitrogen.
Explain how one can purge all that "air" to insure 100% Nitrogen?
IMO, another myth to generate revenue.
Also, maybe someone would share which racing sanctions allow nitrogen in tires?????
 

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The air you breathe is 78% Nitrogen.
Explain how one can purge all that "air" to insure 100% Nitrogen?
IMO, another myth to generate revenue.
Also, maybe someone would share which racing sanctions allow nitrogen in tires?????
Most of the time a quick vacuum pulled on the tire will ensure pure Nitrogen only in tire. Nearly all organizations allow it to my knowledge. Most amateur racers that I know don't bother just because it adds something else to deal with.
It really isn't a myth at all. It does work.


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Seperating the gases is surprisingly simple physics. Some 40 years ago, I interviewed at a company that made the machine. A large machine would be set up at a central collection site if there were numerous wells in the area and would be as large as a 65ft trailer but wider. If wells were far apart a smaller machine, maybe the size of a small suv would be used at individual wells. Since then, they have probably gotten much more sophisticated, efficient, and smaller.

The machine is basically a large centrifuge with several collectors surrounding a hub. Each gas has a specific gravity or weight value. Spin the centrifuge and the various gases seperate into layers with the heaviest at the bottom or outer most part of the arc, lightest gases closest to the hub. Siphon off from the bottom until a sensor notes a difference in the layer (a different pure gas) and send the next layer to different storage bottle. And you have containers of pure nitrogen, hydrogen, butane, etc. Obviously, its more complex than that, but that's the simple explanation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
The air you breathe is 78% Nitrogen.
Explain how one can purge all that "air" to insure 100% Nitrogen?
IMO, another myth to generate revenue.
Also, maybe someone would share which racing sanctions allow nitrogen in tires?????
I don't think anyone suggested there was 100% nitrogen in the tires. I suppose if someone wanted to go to the trouble of pulling a vacuum before inflating with pure nitrogen it would be possible.

The biggest advantage to using nitrogen in the tires is how well it help to maintain tire pressure and helps to reduces mositure. That by itself is worth it to me.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiret...d=TC|21263|_cat:tirerack.com||S|b|6698650813&
 

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A few yeara ago a Chevy dealership I worked at purchased a machine to change the air to nitrogen in all new vehicles when they arrived. I don't know if that is something that all Chevy or GMN dealerships do. The thing was hooked up to all 4 tires at one time and it would remove the air and replace with nitrogen. Any new cars that came in for service that needed air in their tires and had the "nitrogen valve caps" were hooked up to that machine.

The idea that the pressure stays the same, is the main reason to go that way. Constant pressure in the tires will cause even wear on the tires and increase fuel mileage. I would think that you would need to adjust the pressure based on the fact that it won't increase with tire temps. The recommended pressures are set based on temps raising the pressures as you ride.
 

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How about Helium? Lighter, would make vehicle lighter, maybe better fuel mileage? Even better hydrogen, the most common element in the universe, and even lighter but when combined with oxygen it does tend to burn rather quickly.
 
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