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Hello there, I'm considering buying my first wing. A 1994 1500 with 70k. It's in amazing shape. My only reservation is, getting service. It seems that no one works on them anymore, at least in my area, Lexington, ky. I'm fairly handy at turning wrenches. I'm sure I could handle oil and filter change, but timing belt change concerns me. I had a shop tell me they wouldn't even replace the tires because of all the work involved you have to go thru? Are they really that difficult to work on? Thanks for any input and advice in advance.
 

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I believe some Honda dealers have a 10 year old policy. An independent motorcycle mechanic should work on any age bike. My dealer will work on my '06 goldwing.

As far as being hard to work on, some things are a real PITA, some need a little "know how" to get it done, and some are just plain simple. I suggest getting a service manual to help guide you through the more complex items.
 

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If you are a decent wrench turner, the timing belts aren't at all difficult. Just like captain78 said, get a shop manual.
 

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Good advice, and if you have the skills to do so don't let the 1500 deter you. They are a fantastic machine, parts are still fairly available and they are also reliable as all heck.

Now if you are limited in skills then I would suggest holding off that and look for a 2008 or newer 1800 that dealers will still work on. Plus with the advent of the new 1800 there are a ton of used ones available at good prices.

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I purchased my 99 Gold Wing with 52,000 miles from a dealer who will work on it, because I bought it from him. You may want to go in that direction.
 

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Welcome from Indy!

I was intimidated by doing the belts on my '80 GL1100i but after studying it for a while, watching some videos online, it's really a pretty simple procedure. Just have to take your time. Do it! You'll feel so good having both done it yourself and learned how to at the same time.

Good luck and safe travels!
 

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Welcome from the northern tier of PA. You have received great advice from others. Enjoy the forum and ride safe.
 

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The belts may appear daunting at the start, but with a tad of cautionary forethought, they are pretty straight forward. The rear wheel on a 1500 on the other hand is a bit of a handful, if memory serves the bags need to be loosened off to remove the wheel to replace a tire. 1800s are much simpler, just lay the bike over on the right side, pull the 5 lugs nuts and voila. There was a video on here (somewhere) that showed a tire replacement using zip ties to help mount the new tire. Looked pretty slick and would work on just about any bike wheel. I'm going to tackle mine come spring since I have centramatics on it. I have a bead breaker already, and both my Wing and my track bike need new skins.
 

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You can remove the rear wheel on a 1500 buy laying it on it's right side and loosening the left saddle bag, I think there are 2 screws in the trim and 2 or 3 bolts to remove. Before laying it down loosen and remove the axle lock nut from the right side. Then after laying it down gently (I use a furniture pad), lift the left trunk off of the frame and place a short 2x4 between the bag and the frame to give you room to move. Remove the rear caliper and slide it out of the way, and yes there is "a little room" to do that. Rotate the center stand to the extended position and that should give you room to slide the axle bolt out and lift the wheel assembly off of the drive and out of the bike. Make sure you grease up the splines in the final drive before you put it back in. I've gotten to where I can have the rear wheel out in less that ½ hour.

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Word Of Mouth - Contacts

Hey JGM - When looking for a 1500 Goldwing mechanic you might try calling around to some of your local independent bike shops. There are often very qualified factory trained retired/semi-retired Honda Tech's available that work part time or even at home on a call in basis. The local Goldwing support crowds are typically a pretty close knit group with lots of "word of mouth" contacts.

Good Luck With Your Bike Selection - Michael
 

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You have a valid concern. You may end up having to do all the work yourself. But...... there are several different forums for Goldwings (I subscribe to all of them - including a Facebook group). You can be guaranteed that someone has done virtually every repair that can be done on these Goldwings, most often there's photos and step by step instructions. Also, Youtube is your friend. Go to those forums and you'll usually find a DIY section with a ton of things folks have done. You may need to take a certain part to place for certain generic stuff (like a starter motor) but with tools and the internet, you should be good to go on getting that bike!
 

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With a good manual, a decent set of tools and will to try you will be fine. Not much to do on a 1500 except normal maintenance. Had mine 20 years never saw the dealer for any service except fire changes. Welcome from Chocolate town pa and hoping you have miles of smiles.?
 
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