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I purchased a Princess Auto 1000 pound capacity lift table for my 2003 Goldwing. This lift table is the same as the Harbor Freight 1000 pound capacity table. I have added a front wheel chock to the lift table. I rode my bike up onto the table today and found it intimidating as I was not used to it but am sure it will become easier with practise. After I had my bike secured on the table I raised it up about 10 to 12 inches. I rocked it a little from side to side and wondered if it might become unstable if I raised it up the max height of 30 inches. Also when I lowered it I thought it lowered awful fast and when I released the lowering pedal it stopped pretty heavy. My question is- is this lift safe for my Goldwing or am I just too timid?
The second question is about the wheel chock and using the bikes reverse to get it out of the chock. I wasn't able to back the bike out of the the chock without using reverse on the bike. In order to save room in the garage I plan on storing the bike on the lift each night. So this means that each day I ride the bike I will have to use the reverse to get it out of the chock. Will this end up harming my starter motor or any other part on the bike? Thanks fiero1988gt
 

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Hi and welcome.

I just got on like yours a few weeks ago.

I have used the wheel chock and I recommend you put it in nuetral and snatch it back. It will come back easier than a steady pull. I think it's got to be hard on the starter myself but that is an opinion not a fact. I am of the belief that the reverse is maxed out just doing what it was intended to do much less get over a hump.

As for the sturdiness of it. I don't know that I trust the chock alone. I made 10 inch side wings for my feet and a place for the kickstand. I didn't like the narrow width of legs compared to the width of the top plate. I also added legs to these so the weight from the kickstand wouldn't tip it over.

All this to say, it's a solid built lift in my opinion but lacking in some areas. I also added more u clamps to strap the bike.

Better to be cautious until you get used to it. Good luck.
 

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Thanks for your info. I added side extensions of 7 inches on each side of the lift before I put the bike on it. The reason I added the side extensions is so I had a place to put my feet down when I ride the bike up on the lift. Do you have concerns about the capacity of the lift when it is fully raised and do you feel comfortable when it is lowering?
 

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I put a strap on each side to make me feel safer. After that, no issues at all. I have had it all the way up and pushed and pulled until now I feel very confident.

It's an easy quick thing to do if it's going up for some reason.

As for lowering, I am easy on the pedal, mine can go faster but again, I take it slow and haven't had it bump hard.

good luck.
 

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I grew up in a bike shop and we had 4 lifts of this design. They had a wide platform and footprint. They were stable just with the front shock This setup allowed us to use a jack on the lift which enabled us to service the rear wheel. I would secure the lift to the floor. It's not portable but is a lot more stable.
 

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lonewolf, you are right. Bolting it down is smarter and safer.
No matter the weight limit, if the weight shifts, this could flip just like an 18 wheeler going thru a cloverleaf on the highway.
I am still looking for just the right place tho' before I start drillin'.

And as for safety concerns, I like a back up plan with all things. Safety on gun in gunsafe. Emergency brake and in park. For me, whatever method is keeping the bike upright, I add 2 straps in case something fails. I could fall, pull or push in an unexpected way. Maybe overkill but I feel better.
 

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Can't really answer any of your questions but I do know there have been posts on here about the raising and lowering feature of the Harbor Freight model. "If I remember correctly, it seems that to "gently" lower the HF model, you have to do just the opposite of what you would think. That is, you push the pedal completely down in one single motion and that lowers it gently. If you just barely push it down, it lowers it faster. I think that is the way the posts read. I also believe that it states in the HF manual that this is the correct process to use. This is just what I remember so don't take it to the bank but check the procedure for raising and lowering. :D
 

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DW,

I remember reading the discussion but not the details. Maybe that was how it worked but mine is only a couple of months old and it does work is one would expect. I barely move the pedal and it creeps. Maybe they fixed what you described.

I also know there is an adjustment on the bottle that affects it function and that has turned out to give HF lifts a bad name when in fact the directions weren't followed for adjustments. So far, mine works great.
 
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