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Discussion Starter #1
Hello
I have a Honda Valkyrie 1800, 2014 with a mileage of 4000 km.
This is my first Goldwing why the gearbox is so loud. Shifting from 1-2 or 2-3 gears is like pounding.
Is it normal.
On a cold engine it is ok, but when the oil warms up, the gearbox is loud.
I use AMS MCT 10W30 engine oil.
Thank you and best regards
 

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Yup - sounds normal. They don't exactly 'snick' into the lower gears.

My other bike is a Ural. Changing gears on that one sounds like a 50's era farm tractor :). Compared to that, the Wing shifts silently.

Welcome and enjoy your new ride!
 

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Hey Maniek – Most new GW and Valkyrie owners do initially question what seems to be a clunk as you shift through the gears. You’d think a Honda transmission would have a silky click at most - but don’t be concerned. Like EdmKC mentioned, it is just the nature of the beast. Some long time GW riders even suspect this bang between gears is something of a trademark sound. Kind of like Harley Davidson’s attempt to patent their “Potato-Potato-Potato” exhaust at idle….:)

There IS a simple method that many use to tame the clunk a bit. It is known as “Pre-Loading The Shift Lever”. Just as you prepare to shift gears, gently take the slack out of the shift lever and shift tumbler inside the transmission. Then once you feel a slight firmness – select the next gear. Give this a try and with a little practice it will become an automatic reflex.

Keep Us Posted – Michael
 

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Many of us have also experimented with different motor/transmission oils. Some have found using different synthetic or synthetic blends can also make a difference. Be certain the oil meets the “JASO MA“ specs for motorcycles. “Good luck and have fun.”
 

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If you keep a little throttle in it(like speed shifting) it will be smoother. A lot of the clunk comes from the clutch assembly having less mass and trying to spin down too much when you let off of the throttle completely. Honda made the clutch pack smaller and lighter than the previous wings. The lighter springs in it and less mass caused them to have to use engine oil pressure to assist the springs clamping force.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for the information. Techdude2000
Please write what oil you recommend for Honda Valkyrie 1800, 2014 year.
What oil makes the chest silent.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
And can you write step by step how you change gears so that the gearbox runs smoothly?
Maybe I change gears badly and that's why it's loud.
My last bike was the HD RK 2005
Thank you
 

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2007 Goldwing "The Therapist" wife calls it the Mistress.
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And can you write step by step how you change gears so that the gearbox runs smoothly?
Maybe I change gears badly and that's why it's loud.
My last bike was the HD RK 2005
Thank you
Smooth Shifting of a manual transmission.
The oil used makes no difference whatsoever.
  • Reality of it is you can shift the bike without the clutch once it is moving, the clutch would only be used while standing still. You have the drive gear set (Engine) and driven gears set (rear wheel) when the speed of these 2 gear sets differ the result is “CLUNK", Shifting strategy is critical to avoid the CLUNK
  • Roll off the throttle 1/2 way and engage the clutch only 1/3 to 1/2 way all in a synchronous motion at any speed.
 

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Smooth Shifting of a manual transmission.
The oil used makes no difference whatsoever.
  • Reality of it is you can shift the bike without the clutch once it is moving, the clutch would only be used while standing still. You have the drive gear set (Engine) and driven gears set (rear wheel) when the speed of these 2 gear sets differ the result is “CLUNK", Shifting strategy is critical to avoid the CLUNK
  • Roll off the throttle 1/2 way and engage the clutch only 1/3 to 1/2 way all in a synchronous motion at any speed.
This works on most engines, but the 1832cc engine lacks the heavy clutch pack that keeps the engine rpm up when you let off of the throttle. This causes the mainshaft to slow too much and cause a larger difference in speed between it and the countershaft, so you get a clunk by the mismatched speeds. This is why I always recommend not letting off of the throttle as much, close to “speed shifting” to keep the main shaft from slowing too much. There’s really nothing Honda could do to fix this short of making the tranny fully synchronized, the clutch pack was lightened to help with the overall performance and handling of the bike.
 

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Clutch has nothing to do with it once the bike is moving, as stated you only need a clutch while standing still.
 

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Clutch has nothing to do with it once the bike is moving, as stated you only need a clutch while standing still.
The clutch pack’s mass has everything to do with it. When you let off of the throttle, the engine rpm will drop, the amount it drops is determined by the mass of the crankshaft, the friction of the pistons and all the bearings of the rods and crankshaft, the clutch pack mass, and the friction of the main shaft gears and bearings. This engine has a light weight clutch pack and this lack of spinning heavy mass contributes to the main shaft slowing when there’s no throttle being given. It slowing more than other designs causes the mismatch in gear box shaft speeds, which causes the clunk. The slowing of the main shaft exposes the gear box slop in this design. Try it, go out and change gears letting off of the throttle and listen to the huge clunk from 1st to 2nd, then start over and this time don’t let off of the throttle much at all and listen to the click from 1st to 2nd. It’s a world of difference and the difference is the speed of the engine, clutch pack, and the main shaft in relation to the countershaft speed.
 

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The clutch pack’s mass has everything to do with it. When you let off of the throttle, the engine rpm will drop, the amount it drops is determined by the mass of the crankshaft, the friction of the pistons and all the bearings of the rods and crankshaft, the clutch pack mass, and the friction of the main shaft gears and bearings. This engine has a light weight clutch pack and this lack of spinning heavy mass contributes to the main shaft slowing when there’s no throttle being given. It slowing more than other designs causes the mismatch in gear box shaft speeds, which causes the clunk. The slowing of the main shaft exposes the gear box slop in this design. Try it, go out and change gears letting off of the throttle and listen to the huge clunk from 1st to 2nd, then start over and this time don’t let off of the throttle much at all and listen to the click from 1st to 2nd. It’s a world of difference and the difference is the speed of the engine, clutch pack, and the main shaft in relation to the countershaft speed.
The mass of the clutch, friction of the crank shaft, pistons create an Inertia defined by the weight and friction of these components which have no bearing on the synchronization of the drive gear set and the driven gear set it boils down to what we both are speaking of its a matter of gear shifting technic which differs from rider to rider.
 

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The mass of the clutch, friction of the crank shaft, pistons create an Inertia defined by the weight and friction of these components which have no bearing on the synchronization of the drive gear set and the driven gear set it boils down to what we both are speaking of its a matter of gear shifting technic which differs from rider to rider.
I agree, but the point I was trying to make is this engine/tranny combination is very finicky about that technique due to the lighter clutch pack causing less flywheel effect on the crankshaft and the main shaft. It simply spins down quicker than other motorcycle engines and makes it harder to shift smoothly. By the way, Welcome to the board.
 
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