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It would nice to visit the museum part anyways. Thanks, I have my ID. In California, I was only TDY to George and left for SE Asia out of Travis.

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It would nice to visit the museum part anyways. Thanks, I have my ID. In California, I was only TDY to George and left for SE Asia out of Travis.

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Its kind of cool, they even have a former nuclear missile (decomissioned of course) on static display. Bell GAM-63 Rascal Air Missile
Castle Air Museum | Atwater, California

Open cockpit days this year are 5/31 and 10/02 and they have them every year.
 

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Although I have participated in a number of motorcycle gatherings over the years and enjoy three - four up group rides, but for long distance multi-week trips I've always preferred solo travel. With no schedule to adjust, it allows me to keep my own hours in the saddle and set up camp when and if a place interests me. Taking the old two lane roads that cuts through the historic "Route 66" type towns are my favorite back country to see. One beautiful Bozeman Montana road I remember kept turning into a dirt horse trail and then dead ended against a barbed wire fence but after backtracking each time, I finally rode it all to a falling down 1850's mining town. As I passed an abandoned old dilapidated ranch house I stopped to eat on the front porch. In the remains of the yard there were a bunch of oversized rusty metal Tonka Toys. It looked like the kids had just left them in the dirt long ago when they quit playing for the afternoon. At one time you could stop in at a small town gas station with a bench out front to chew the fat with the local retirees and hear all the town gossip. Now the old timers gather at McDonalds for coffee and talk about the neighbor's dogs barking all night. For the last 6 months I haven't signed on to this site and kind of kept to myself after I lost a good friend. We'd been in Nam together in what seems like 100 years ago now. I knew it was his time to go but still struggling with him passing on.

Keep your friends close, they are hard to find - ride safe and stop to smell the roses every chance you get....

Michael
 

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Although I have participated in a number of motorcycle gatherings over the years and enjoy three - four up group rides, but for long distance multi-week trips I've always preferred solo travel. With no schedule to adjust, it allows me to keep my own hours in the saddle and set up camp when and if a place interests me. Taking the old two lane roads that cuts through the historic "Route 66" type towns are my favorite back country to see. One beautiful Bozeman Montana road I remember kept turning into a dirt horse trail and then dead ended against a barbed wire fence but after backtracking each time, I finally rode it all to a falling down 1850's mining town. As I passed an abandoned old dilapidated ranch house I stopped to eat on the front porch. In the remains of the yard there were a bunch of oversized rusty metal Tonka Toys. It looked like the kids had just left them in the dirt long ago when they quit playing for the afternoon. At one time you could stop in at a small town gas station with a bench out front to chew the fat with the local retirees and hear all the town gossip. Now the old timers gather at McDonalds for coffee and talk about the neighbor's dogs barking all night. For the last 6 months I haven't signed on to this site and kind of kept to myself after I lost a good friend. We'd been in Nam together in what seems like 100 years ago now. I knew it was his time to go but still struggling with him passing on.

Keep your friends close, they are hard to find - ride safe and stop to smell the roses every chance you get....

Michael
Michael, so sorry to hear about the loss of your friend. Those friendships are forged in stone and last forever. I have an Army friend who saved my life and he's been ill for a while. We talk often and have for the last 35 years but the opportunities to see him are few since he lives in Alaska. I need to do better while we can still get together.

Steve
 

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Michael, Sorry for your loss. I know all too well how you are feeling.
 

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I've got the same compulsion. End up at your destination and you say "Yes! It's done!" and then realize that you didn't see much of the land. I am going coast to coast in May/June and back and I think you just need to find things along your route and set those as stops and then make sure you go out of your way to hit them. Is your wing a 2018+ or older model? Tripplanner.honda.com is a very handy site for planning routes, it finds things very effectively, almost google like and exports to GPX format so just about any GPS should work.

If you have time you can visit Angelfire, NM in the hills outside of Taos. First major Vietnam memorial. Dedicated May 22, 1971
Memorial History – Vietnam Veterans Memorial
A very peaceful place but it can get cold, even in late May. Snowed on us in 2019 on the run for the wall.

Basically, pick places like this, get a GPS and plug them in. Let the GPS force you to take a preplanned trip you normally would have just blown by. You can set yourself a rule that you can ADD stops but not remove them from your trip to make sure you hit what you planned but can add stops as well.

As to WHAT to visit, I usually add things to my list based on watching youtube channels. "Shadetree surgeon", "Maikeli7", "Adam Sandoval", etc.
This is a good strategy but I'm not sure how you'll cover the ground you need to cover in the time allotted, riding only 6-7 hours with stops at attractions. I always figure that no matter what road I'm taking or how fast we're travelling (within reason), I expect no better than 50 miles per hour of riding. This is partly because gas stops and bathroom stops, etc. really eat away your day, more than you'd think.

I'm in PA and have been through all the surrounding states numerous times and though they all have their charm and places to see, I'm in love with big mountains and so always gravitate West. With that in mind and given that I've been taking long cycle trips since 1982, there's just not that much of interest until I get a few days away from here so I try to put on as many miles on days 1, 2 and sometimes 3, typically at least 650 not usually more than 800 to get through the more familiar territory and also away from the mass of people between here and Chicago!

I study info about the areas that I'll be riding through and those I want to stop for a day or more, pick stuff I want to do or see and just plan it out that way. Like you, I prefer the 2 lanes, ESPECIALLY when I'm in places I really love. There are beautiful sections of both I 70 and I 90 in CO and MT respectively but if I'm not near those sections, I'll be on a 2 lane, for sure. This year's ride we will be taking US 2 from the U.P. of MI all the way to Glacier and then on to Libby. It is mostly a 2 lane road.

For me, it's worth riding a couple really long days in order to have more time to explore places like Glacier NP, Yellowstone NP or Grand Teton NP. This summer we'll be spending two nights in East Glacier and will only be riding to Libby, MT, about a 5 hour leisurely ride where we'll spend the next 4 nights and 3 days visiting a friend and doing some cool side trips from our base there.

Anyway, that's how I mix getting there with seeing stuff. If there's stuff along the way to NM that you'd like to see more of, plan a future trip to go to some or all of those places. Enjoy yourself, regardless!
 

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Not to get too long-winded here but years ago I camped on cycle trips. As I got older I decided that a real bed, a good hot shower and air conditioned sleeping quarters were more important than saving money plus my back bothered me more after riding all day and sleeping on the ground, guess I'm getting soft!!! Anyway, now I make reservations and don't find that it hurts the experience. Barring any unforeseen, more serious issues, I can guess pretty closely by now how long a ride will take and I don't mind if I have to ride a few extra hours to get to where I'm going versus where I "felt like" stopping. If it's that cool of a place, I'll try to remember it for next time. That being said, some guys don't want to consider a 14 hour day on their bike but, we have Goldwings so, we don't mind!! ;-) Making reservations is a must at some places too, like close to Glacier, Yellowstone, Tetons, Yosemite, etc., even sometimes for campsites, from what I've heard.
 

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Only once did i have a room problem ,,i was up in Arkansas riding the hills with a friend on a Memorial day holiday,,,we could not find a room and road way to many miles got way to tired and finally made our way to Branson Missouri just to get a room .. so be careful as you know we love our machines but they require following good safety rules and getting to tired will get you killed on these things ..
 

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Small tent, inflatable camp pad, supply of water/food for a couple days. That gives you the freedom to stop wherever the day's activities land you. If a hotel room doesn't pan out, then camp for a night. The biggest thing here is to be open mentally to the adventure and spontaneity of the trip.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
Amen. People don't realize that you can free camp in any Nat'l Forest, most BLM lands, etc. Once you set up camp in the middle of nowhere you ARE stopping to smell the roses.
 

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I have done a number of week long trips two-up with my wife on a GL1800 but I'm now retired and am planning my first long distance solo trip. My vision is to ride from North Carolina to Santa Fe, pick my wife up at the airport there, ride to Denver, CO (visit a brother not seen in many years), drop the wife off at the Denver airport, ride down the Million Dollar Highway, and the work my way back to NC (15 days is my preliminary estimate). My problem is that I am a Point A to Point B rider. I often regret not stopping at something that looked interesting.

When long distance riding, my priorities are to stay off the interstates as much as practical, have a motel reserved for each night, be off the road between sunset and sunrise, and avoid being too tired to ride safely. I suspect these priorities (conditions?) contribute to a sense of urgency in getting to the daily destination but I don't consider any to be negotiable.

I would appreciate advice from anyone who has overcome the Point A to Point B mentality. Actually, I welcome all thoughts on how to overcome this.
My husband and I used to do a fairly regular trip to Texas, to visit his side of the fam. We eventually got a specific route for it, and stayed at the same hotel each time. When we rode up to Washington state to see my side of the fam, we really only booked one hotel in advance, as it was in a HUGE tourist place, just outside of the Grand Teton national park, and we knew that there would be no rooms available if we didn't. We also did one on the way home. It was in Oregon, and I think that the hubs knew how far he could ride that day, and there wasn't anything we hadn't already stopped to see on the way up. Now, my sis in law did get on line on our second night out (I'd called her to let her know we were in for the night) and she gave us recommendations for the general vicinity we might be in by the end of the next day. We only ever had one problem getting a room, but we did get one. It was in Wisconsin, first home game for the Packers. We started out trying to get a room about 35 miles south of Green Bay. Ended up down near Oshkosh by the time we found one. And it was the last one in that hotel. Most of the time, we would just start looking at billboards (pre smart phones) for hotel ads. Most give all the important info on the billboard; amenities, location, etc. We found some really great hotels that way. That would give us an idea of where we might want to stop for the night.
 

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On our way from near Knoxville to Williams, AZ I made the mistake of planning well over 400 miles a day (all on US70 until it ended in Globe). We arrived worn out. The next day and train ride to the canyon refreshed us, and I planned our route home via US60 to be less than 400 miles per day, only reserving rooms one day in advance. The return trip was much more relaxed and enjoyable. Four primary mistakes - too many miles a day, destination having a tight schedule, not building in an in-case day, thus not allowing weather to cause a wait-out day. We still had a ball and ~4300 miles of travel, but it could have been better for both of us. I was really proud of how the wife didn't complain.
 
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