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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
About a year ago I bought a pair of Ecco Exohike goretex hiking boots which have been the most comfortable boots I have ever worn, right out of the box. The boots are very lightweight, above the ankle and made of the softest leather I have ever found on any boots I have ever owned. Not only are these boots very comfortable to walk in, they are completely waterproof. I have ridden hundreds of miles in pouring rain, through thunderstorms and flooded roads and have never had wet feet while wearing these Ecco boots. I believe they cost around $250.00 or so but haven't been able to find this particular model, so I don't know what the current cost is. The boots are made in Denmark and I highly recommend them.
See ya'll out there on the backroads of this great country.

Jitters
USSF, 67-68, 70 RVN, MOPH
I will look them up...thanks?
 

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I own a pair of Sidi Canyon Gore-Tex Boots. I selected them for the thick sole and adequate heel (I'm relatively short for the Gold Wing, at only 5'7' (in shoes) so I need all the leg-reach I can get. The boots can be tough to pull on, but that's probably because I don't like to fully loosen the straps if I don't have to. As for comfort, they are very comfortable. I guess my only caveat to your question is that I like a boot that is stiff through the ankle. These certainly are. However, I find them to be very comfortable for walking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I own a pair of Sidi Canyon Gore-Tex Boots. I selected them for the thick sole and adequate heel (I'm relatively short for the Gold Wing, at only 5'7' (in shoes) so I need all the leg-reach I can get. The boots can be tough to pull on, but that's probably because I don't like to fully loosen the straps if I don't have to. As for comfort, they are very comfortable. I guess my only caveat to your question is that I like a boot that is stiff through the ankle. These certainly are. However, I find them to be very comfortable for walking.
I don't mind if they are a little stiff at the ankle as long as I can walk in them without my feet hurting.
 

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I just borrowed my mothers army boots and I’m fine!
( Your mama wears the army boots!!!)🤣🤣
In the Russian Army to boot! That's funny Ralph, and I'm surprised nobody said it before you.

I've been lurking on this and the boots I wear aren't motorcycle boots. I wear my work boots, which are a lace up leather with an 8" upper and Vibram lug soles. They work as great on the bike for ankle and foot protection as they do at work. Mine are a custom fit/build from Nick's Boots in Washington. They need very little break in period and are the most comfortable foot wear I own. At work I walk, so they need to both protect and be comfortable. They make all types, which you can look up online, but I have to warn you, they are the most expensive piece of clothing I own. You can send them back in for a rebuild for about half the price. With the conditions I put mine through at work, I get about 3 years out of a pair before replacing or rebuilding. American made and there are other companies that wildland firefighters support such as White's and Danner. I've worn White's but they don't fit me as well as my Nick's.

Any leather boot will last longer with cleaning and care. Saddle soap occasionally to clean them. Then I regularly oil them after cleaning with Obenauf's. A beeswax based formula that will protect and condition the leather which helps with waterproofing. I have both the oil and cream and use them both. Waterproofing is never perfect, the leather has holes from the stitching. So letting the leather dry out will cause those holes to be bigger. Getting boots wet and muddy, then letting them dry like that shortens the life tremendously. But mud on the motorcycle is rare. Also to dry your boots it's best to not expose them to heat. Best thing I've found is to stuff them with newspaper (if you can find this any longer) when you get to your destination. Then change it out before going to bed. The newspaper will absorb moisture and by morning it will be pretty good.
 
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
In the Russian Army to boot! That's funny Ralph, and I'm surprised nobody said it before you.

I've been lurking on this and the boots I wear aren't motorcycle boots. I wear my work boots, which are a lace up leather with an 8" upper and Vibram lug soles. They work as great on the bike for ankle and foot protection as they do at work. Mine are a custom fit/build from Nick's Boots in Washington. They need very little break in period and are the most comfortable foot wear I own. At work I walk, so they need to both protect and be comfortable. They make all types, which you can look up online, but I have to warn you, they are the most expensive piece of clothing I own. You can send them back in for a rebuild for about half the price. With the conditions I put mine through at work, I get about 3 years out of a pair before replacing or rebuilding. American made and there are other companies that wildland firefighters support such as White's and Danner. I've worn White's but they don't fit me as well as my Nick's.

Any leather boot will last longer with cleaning and care. Saddle soap occasionally to clean them. Then I regularly oil them after cleaning with Obenauf's. A beeswax based formula that will protect and condition the leather which helps with waterproofing. I have both the oil and cream and use them both. Waterproofing is never perfect, the leather has holes from the stitching. So letting the leather dry out will cause those holes to be bigger. Getting boots wet and muddy, then letting them dry like that shortens the life tremendously. But mud on the motorcycle is rare. Also to dry your boots it's best to not expose them to heat. Best thing I've found is to stuff them with newspaper (if you can find this any longer) when you get to your destination. Then change it out before going to bed. The newspaper will absorb moisture and by morning it will be pretty good.
Custom fitting sounds like a great idea.
 

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In the Russian Army to boot! That's funny Ralph, and I'm surprised nobody said it before you.

I've been lurking on this and the boots I wear aren't motorcycle boots. I wear my work boots, which are a lace up leather with an 8" upper and Vibram lug soles. They work as great on the bike for ankle and foot protection as they do at work. Mine are a custom fit/build from Nick's Boots in Washington. They need very little break in period and are the most comfortable foot wear I own. At work I walk, so they need to both protect and be comfortable. They make all types, which you can look up online, but I have to warn you, they are the most expensive piece of clothing I own. You can send them back in for a rebuild for about half the price. With the conditions I put mine through at work, I get about 3 years out of a pair before replacing or rebuilding. American made and there are other companies that wildland firefighters support such as White's and Danner. I've worn White's but they don't fit me as well as my Nick's.

Any leather boot will last longer with cleaning and care. Saddle soap occasionally to clean them. Then I regularly oil them after cleaning with Obenauf's. A beeswax based formula that will protect and condition the leather which helps with waterproofing. I have both the oil and cream and use them both. Waterproofing is never perfect, the leather has holes from the stitching. So letting the leather dry out will cause those holes to be bigger. Getting boots wet and muddy, then letting them dry like that shortens the life tremendously. But mud on the motorcycle is rare. Also to dry your boots it's best to not expose them to heat. Best thing I've found is to stuff them with newspaper (if you can find this any longer) when you get to your destination. Then change it out before going to bed. The newspaper will absorb moisture and by morning it will be pretty good.
Back in my logging days, I wore Westco Boots. I had them special made for me due to being a high climber I want boots that covered the calf so the climbing spurs were more comfortable. This was back in the early 70's and my boots cost me about 400.00. I used Mink oil and Hubbards boot grease to keep them water proof. Wesco had their boot manufacturing in Scappoose, Oregon, that is where I went to have them measure for fit, I don't know if they are still there but at that time they had been there since the 30's.
 
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Just bought a pair of Milwaukee drag harness boots. Havent even put em on yet. Ill see how comfy they are. Well made and a good thick traction sole. Good lookin too.
 

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The Daytona Roadstar GTX is totally comfortable from day one. After spending a considerable sum on a pair, I was really disheartened to find the toe box to be too tight, even though the boot size itself was fine. Then I swapped out the stock insoles for a pair of these thin, merino wool insoles, and it was a total game changer. After that, the boots delivered all day comfort, riding or walking.


Hand made in Germany. Only $14. Highly recommend.

Cliff, Pittsburgh
 
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