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Hey Guys,

I figured I'd save some space and do this whole Introduction/First Post at the same time.

Basically, me and a guy I know through the Army started talking, and it turned out that he had 1981 Goldwing GL1100 he didn't have much use for. It had 45,000 miles, and needed a little work, but he told me he'd sell it to me for $700, so I bought it. It runs and rides fine, just needs some brakes, paint, new seat, and has a small hole in the exhaust.

The thing is, I've never thrown my leg over anything but a sportbike. I've got two Honda CBR's. Ones for the street, and ones for the track. The thought of riding a standard cruiser-type has just never occurred to me, much less a Goldwing. But $700 for a running bike, that I can put my girl on without having to hear her complain? My hands were tied.

So, with all of my pre-existing notions crushed, I bought an "old-guy bike", (no offense), and I must say, I'm thoroughly enjoying it.

I humbly come looking for some advice. This bike needs work, but it wouldn't take much to get it looking great again. My main concern is that some of the hard plastic has dried out pretty good, from sitting outside for the past 3 years.

I WAS planning a rebuild of my current engine, but after getting a basic idea for how much that would cost, I think I'll just look for extra motors here and there on Craigslist. I'll start with a general tune-up, carb cleaning, etc, and we'll see from there. Definitely needs some paint, new seat, and new exhaust.

Any adivce you guys can offer as I start this project is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

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Yes. take your time, enjoy the project. I did a 79 GL1000 for the last year and a half. I love the fun I get from a job well done. Did my own paint work, modifications of new/newer parts. If you need any help, feel free to give me a call. I have dealt with several vendores and sites for Goldwing parts. Not a lot of experience, but a lot of contacts. LOL

Bob
 

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Hi Jeff, welcome to the GWOF Can't help you much on the reno. All I can tell you is enjoy riding the Wing, It is definitely built for comfort.
 

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45,000 miles is no big deal for that engine . The carbs are most likely junked-up with sediment . The whole carb package comes out from the side , clean them out then get a manometer to dial them in (equalize), get fresh tires and put a self tapping screw in the exhaust hole and ride for another 45k.:D:
 

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Preventative Maintenance !!!

Hey Jeff -

I just purchased my 3rd wing and its the oldest one so far, a 76. Everytime my Indian goes in the shop for more than 4 weeks I buy a wing, they are so dependable! From my experiences plus all the research I have done you want to make sure she is sound and safe before you get into the pretty stuff. If you are not sure what all has been done you will want to make sure you change that timing belt ASAP. If it breaks while hitting some RPMs you will trash the engine and just lost the bike and waisted your money! Other sites recommend mixing Dextron ATF and straight 30 weight oil at 50-50 in the crankcase and run it at idle for 30 minutes, let sit an hour and repeat about 4 times. Then drain, change the oil filter and fill with good oil, either 10w40 bike oil or Shells 15w40 all purpose oil. It would depend on your climate and the mileage. I normally use 10w40 in cold weather and switch to 15w40 in the early summer. This will get rid of years of builtup sludge in that bike and it should respond a little better when you are in the throttle. Make sure the plugs and plug wires are fresh and drop a little Marvel Mystery oil in the tank from time to time to keep the carbs lightly lubed so they don't stick. About 1.5 oz. per gal of fuel. However if they are dirty clean the carbs first and sync up. Check your cooling system and flush and refill with the correct coolant for that type of engine. You want a comfy seat for the long rides and especially if you have a sweet one on the back. JC Whitney has some good seats and at good prices. You can always check with local places that do car seats and see if they can do something custom for your bike. Next replace the fork oil and inspect the fork seals and the rest of the suspension. Safety First - Flush out all the brake fluid and bleed the lines and make sure your brake pads have some life in them. I also recommend crash bars in the front as soon as possible if you don't have them. Not so much to save my leg or for a foot rest, but because the engine covers are so easily destroyed by the smallest things. The crash bars could save you a lot of time and money down the road if the bike accidently falls over! Plus the girls will think you are trying to provide a safe ride for them! If you need a good book to assist in all of this I like the Clymer book for mechanics. Its worth the $50 bucks! If you ever get into the wiring you will be glad to have the book! Last but not least is paint. You can spend the money on a pro job or spray can it yourself. That depends on your talent and budget. I have found using a laquer paint with a tip that fans or sprays flat instead of conical lays down well then lay down 3 or 4 coats of clear. once dry wet sand with 1000 grit, just enough to knock off the tips, you don't want to get into the next layer of clear, and buff out with the white rubbing compound. wash it and put 3 coats of a high quality wax on her and she should look pretty good! Plus it gives you braggin rights on the weekends (and the girls like a man thats good with his hands!) Be aware the Laquer will be a little more brittle and doesn't flex to well and will start to check and crack if you have to pull on the plastics a lot. But it does give a great shine for spray bombs! You can always have a pro job done later as money allows. The main thing is to get out and ride and enjoy the bike and enjoy life and make sure you PM the bike so she will bring you back home at the end of the day! Good Luck.
 

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Great post Silver. I could not have said it any better myself.
 

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At just 45,000 miles the engine is just starting to get broken in. Like was said before, have the carbs cleaned and sync'd, change all the fluids and then get to work on the other stuff. As far as painting goes just take you time and sand all the old paint off doing it one peice at the time. I think there are somewhere around 15 seperate parts on a Interstate or Aspencade so it is quite a job. Paint all the parts at one time building racks for the parts to hang on while being painted. If you try to paint them seperately chances are the color match wont be spot on. For other parts shop ebay. Just about anything you need is out there. It will be well worth the effort when your done. As far as it being "an Old mans bike" I bought my first GoldWing in 1977. I was in my early 20's then. I put a 177,000 miles on that bike and one of my sons owns it now with over 220,000 running on the same bottom end. While a few of my buddys were riding there Harleys from bar to bar and a few others were riding the Interceptors and such down to the local drag strip I was out seeing the world and racking up the miles. There is nothing like seeing the world from the seat of a motorcycle. Once you fix it up you'll be hooked. Your girl will love it as well.
 

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Military -

I remember buying my first street bike when I was in the military. It was trashed and I got it cheap but I thought it was cool !!! I had no clue how to work on that bike and not much money available. You guys are right, 45,000 miles on a wing is nothin but if she has been neglected some then there are things that should have been replaced at 25,000 miles that need looking into right away. Based on my experience with young military guys I am just concerned the bike needs some things and would hate to see any of our soldiers end up stranded due to routine maint for a bike. Hey we all were young once and had to learn by doing! I have friends that have 300,000 and 400,000 miles on older wings and never had to get into the engine or trans, just normal stuff like starters, brakes, fluid changes, and a lot of tires! LOL

At least the wing won't cost as much to maintain as an old Harley or Indian !!! LOL
 

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Do have fun sprucing up your 1100. Once you have all the larger items checked off, make sure you check all your rubber and plastics for signs of aging (cracks, whitish fatigue spots etc) as a machine of that age will tend to turn these parts brittle over time. Brake hoses, fuel lines, cables etc. and all the associated fittings. A little time and patience with these will pay off huge in the long run. Be careful with your tyres, even if the tread looks good, they have a life-span limit (5-7 years) and there is a manufacture date printed on the sidewall. Those rubber doughnuts are all that resides between bike, rider, and road rash. Be dilligent and then enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies, guys. I'm going to pull the carb assembly and give it a good cleaning, as soon as I pick the bike up, as well as replace the timing belts. Plan to flush and replace all fluids, as well. It'll need a brake job, too. Hopefully just pads...

Any reason I should rebuild the master cylinder or caliper?
 

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Flush and bleed the brake system real good and ride it awhile and see if it needs it. No reason to rebuild it unless it needs it. Routine fluid changes will help prevent replacing or rebuilding some of that stuff. But if it needs it it do it sooner rather than later - safety!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the replies, guys.
My master cylinder reservoir is extremely dry, and is starting to fall apart. It doesn't leak or anything, its just drying out, and when you rub it, white powdery stuff comes off.
Any ideas?
 
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