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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm planning on making my first 2,000 mile round trip with my teenager as passenger before too long. What can I do so I'm not walking around like someone who has been in the saddle to long. Others have mentioned sheepskin, a hammock saddle (not in my price range). gel pad, the airhawk or wearing padded bicycle shorts. What advice do you have for us to be as comfortable and as safe as possible on a long ride? I'm going to be riding a 1989 GL1500.
Thanks!

Don't bother responding, as I'll never be back.
 

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My 1st thoughts are your model year you posted is incorrect. Not a big deal because we know but the 1500 was introduced in 1988

Now for the other details, I would say the absolute best thing you can do is to take frequent breaks. Start out by stopping between 50-75 miles at 1st, even if all you do is get off stretch walk around for a few minutes then head back out. Build up a quickly as you feel you can to 100-150 miles and that should help a lot.

There are many folks who ride tank to tank and we have done it ourselves but a great percentage of people stop every 100-150 miles anyway to take a short break.

When we did our Iron Butt run, we stopped between 100-130 miles for fuel, drinks, and restrooms.

That was 1143 miles in less than 22 hrs and made it possible by stopping that frequently.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My 1st thoughts are your model year you posted is incorrect. Not a big deal because we know but the 1500 was introduced in 1988

You are absolutely right. I'm getting my Virago year mixed up with my Goldwing. I shall fix that. :)
 

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For me... .the key is comfy gear and helmet and then the foot pegs to be able to shift around from time to time.

On my 1500 I did 750 miles in one day.......375 miles then watched the girls from the school I teach at play a regional championship basketball game.... then 375 miles back home only stopped for gas.... of course had some place I had to be by a certain time.

A shorter trip was way worse because of a helmet I was wearing..... pressure point on the forehead would start to burn.

Best advice, don't push the first days. Get sore the first day....and it is down hill from there.

I have a trip I want to make..... but have to convince the wife to by a plane ticket, and I will meet her in about 4-5 days. It would be 5000 miles round trip. Don't see it happening anytime soon.

Have a nice safe trip when you go.
 
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The previous posts with advice are all spot on. Maybe I have a few more of value. First if you are riding alone, it is your trip. If you are tired. Take a break. If you are hot stop and find some shade. Don’t plan marathon days for this first long trip. You have to get in riding shape. I am 12 days deep in a ride that so far has covered 4800 miles. Today rode over 500. Tomorrow about the same. I do this a lot. Couldn’t do it when I started and didn’t want to. However, some days it makes sense to do it that way. Not every day. My advice with the teen make it fun. We rode to key west in March with our daughter. She is no teen but about 300 per day was max. Find fun things to do. If you are riding with others the plans will have to be discussed. Good luck. If hope you have a ball. Long distance touring is my passion. I love it.
 

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I have a 2008 Wing and an Airhawk pad made a world of difference for me. Keeps me butt cool and comfortable. I also have a set of highway pegs, great to be able sit back to your backrest and stretch your legs.
 

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Stay hydrated. Lack of water makes the pain worse.Another advantage is you may be taking more rest stops. Even a few minutes out the the saddle will help.
 

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I vote for the Air Hawk cushion (very little air is needed), foot pegs and a back rest. Don't forget your teen. He/she will need to change position too, so a set of transformer floor boards would be nice. A communication system for the two of you will make a world of difference. Being able to chat and point out various things to each other greatly enhances the joy of riding.
 

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More Organized -

Hey Pam - Just a couple of suggestions that may help during your bike trip in preparation for a worse case scenario. Make a photocopy of your drivers license, insurance and registration paperwork as a backup. I store this information in a zip-lock bag "BELOW" the lockable fairing pocket. Just use a screw driver to remove the plastic pocket recess. Write down your license plate number and keep it on you. Make a copy of your ignition key and hide it somewhere on the frame that's difficult to find. I wrap my spare key in black electrical tape then tape it to the frame so it doesn't look like a key.

For safety and Convenience --

1 Write down any important medical information and keep it on you.

2 Carry a First Aid Kit and be familiar with it's contents

3 Buy one of those (Walmart $10) 90 degree digital air gauges. They are accurate and able to easily reach the typical motorcycle tire's air valve. Because this can be a bit tricky - PRACTICE USING IT BEFORE LEAVING. Unscrew the air valve cap - carefully CENTER the air gauge on the air valve (do this lightly by feel before pushing down on the gauge so you don't unnecessarily loose a lot of tire pressure). Press "Straight Down" firmly on the air gauge (this can be awkward) with BOTH hands. When NO Air Pressure is Escaping - the reading will be accurate.

4 Take a (Walmart) emergency "Tire Plug Repair Kit with you. Practice using the "T Handle" to install a plug into the carcass of an old car tire and Practice using the bike's air compressor to add air to a tire BEFORE LEAVING. This can get you out of a hotel parking lot when you come out one morning to discover a nail in a flat tire.

5 Use soft sided bags as inserts inside your saddle bags and trunk to hold your belongings. Medium Sized Inexpensive tote bags will allow you to quickly remove everything in one wack each night at the hotel rather than having to unpack each item individually.

According to my wife - Woman are naturally very organized - and will be far superior in a packing strategy than what most men could suggest, so at this point I'll bow out. :)

Ride Safe - Michael
 

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Best Memories -

Hey Pam - One other suggestion for your plans to take a road trip on your new GW. Even though it will be hot this time of year - Don't put off completing your bucket list. I just returned from a memorial trip up to the Kentucky-Tennessee border on my bike to pay my respects to a cousin who just passed. He was my age but when I last visited with him he was recovering from major bypass heart surgery. Although he may not have been 100% he insisted that we ride our bikes deep into the Smokey Mountains along his favorite back country roads and head for one of his best-loved camp sites. I'm sure these places had the footprints of the original native Americans and early pioneers along the creeks. Even though my wife hates me riding the "Dragon's Tail" because of it's dangerous reputation for bike crashes, we took our traditional lap.

Some of your best memories are made on a daily basis.

Stay Hydrated and Ride Safe - Michael
 

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The only things I can add is adjust your bike to fit you
Adjust pegs/highway pegs, back rest handle bars
Helmets are adjustable by removing /adding padding
comfortable boots/ gloves
Good quality eyewear
Even with the quietness of our bikes the road/tire whine can wear you down
I will use soft ear plugs
Hot weather baby powder is a good idea for cooling the seat area
Enjoy

everyday is a good day.....some are just gooder than others
 

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Ride by the force, in other words don't stop unless your forced to. Lot of good advice to base your decision on but it all really depends on you, I would suggest ride as long as you can without stopping then when you need to stop for either gas or to stretch or snacks or cool off or whatever , at that point asses the situation and listen to your body.

If it tells you bring it on then hop back on and get going, if your sore stretch it out, if your tired rest, basically do what you need to do. I have ridden a few long days on occasion and some 2 up some solo, some in hot and some in cold, some dry some not so dry, and the key to it all is ride your ride and do what feels right. I am a tank to tank rider when I am alone which on my current bike can be a little over 4 hours and 270 miles at a time. But have also done 1000 mile day on a 700 Nighthawk with only a 120 mile range so stopped a lot. In my opinion stopping often or not stopping at all really just depends on the bikes level of comfort for you.

My GL1500 was a great running bike but took massive modifications to get it mostly comfortable due to my height and leg length. Same issue of long legs and arms on the Nighthawk, and now on my Concourse zg1000. I could move around and stretch legs and all that is fine and easy to deal with, the hardest thing to overcome is the seat. Always start with the seat, getting monkey but or having a sweaty tookis and burning feeling does not go away by stretching at a gas stop.

Anything you can do to keep your butt cool and not hurting is worth it's weight in gold, can try sheep skin, airhawk, wood beads, or get a new seat. No matter what else is said once you get beyond the butt hurt zone your day goes down hill real fast after that and only time off the bike can fix that, usually hours not minutes. All 3 of the bikes I listed above had the OEM seat redone or replaced all together, if not for that I would be forced to be a CAT tourer and only ride one or two tanks of gas a day.

Good luck on your trip.....oh and the teen will prolly be just fine no matter what you do.
 

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Pam, last summer I did a run from here to Fossil's place in PA and back. I ran through Canada to Niagara where I met my wife and from there we went into central NY state to meet with Bill and JaNice. And from there rode down to the their home in central PA. Only one day was two up and wasn't a long haul, like 400 miles total with her on the back. On the way home (she flew) I crossed through the midwest through Columbus, up to Davenport, then into the plains in Spencer, Rapid City and up through eastern Wyoming (Devil's Tower) to Great Falls. Last leg was a straight shot home. 4 Days riding to Niagara, then the one day to PA (2700 miles total in 5 days), and 5 days home (3000 miles). Not large daily averages but mileage doesn't always tell the whole story. Extreme heat took it's toll on my travels both ways, and 5 of those riding days were pushing 15 hours and a good part of the time I was hauling a good clip at or above 80 mph (not in Ontario BTW:wink2:). 5700 miles doesn't sound like much in 10 days but like I said, heat will drain your personal reserves. Always hedge towards safety. Both your lives can depend on your decisions.
Of course we want to hear all about it and pictures are em, required. >:)
 
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I just added an Airhawk seat pad, the one with the red strip down the middle. It has made a real difference on comfort. It keeps things cool too! Well worth the $107.00 I paid for it. Good luck on your trip. Enjoy it.
 

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I didn't see it mentioned, but the handle bars on the 1500 are adjustable.A Comfortable position for your arms and shoulders can also make fore a better day of riding.
 

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Most of what I would say has been covered. So, I'll just re-iterate one important safety factor: Don't push it beyond your body's limits just because 'I need to get to x by this evening'. Riding requires that you be constantly alert. If you're thinking more about the pain in your backside than what may be around that next bend/18wheeler/cager then you're in a dangerous place mentally. Lots of people get away with it. Plenty don't, and the laws of physics are NOT on our side when on 2 wheels.
That being said, there's nothing like a long ride on a bike for clearing away the stress of everyday life. :)
 
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Here's what my wife and I did on our 10,000 cross country trek we did last summer:

- Worked out at the gym and focused on butt and torso exercise machines. I'm not a super fit person, but this really helped
- Drink Gatoraide to stay hydrated. We discovered it's magic powers mid-trip and what a difference in our stamina.
- Hi-Way Pegs - really nice to change leg positions on a long ride
- Nylon sports undies & no blue jeans - I wore sports undies (not cotton) and a good set of riding pants with the mesh that allows air-flow on your legs. Less sweat, more comfort!
- Ear Plugs - we bought high end ear plugs from www.earpeace.com, they cut back on the riding noise, but you can still hear well enough to have a conversation with your riding partner. We found that the quiet reduced riding fatigue. I suppose an $800 Helmet might do the same.
- Take breaks when you need them. With the exception of the wide open spaces out west, we usually stop every 75 miles for a butt break for just a few minutes
 
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I have done a lot of 2000 when I ride to my home state of New Jersey. (2000 miles one way then heading home)
1. If you experience mechanical, weather, traffic that delays you and you can't make it up then extend the time on your ride, safety first.
2. If you going to do a 2000 prepare by riding regularly and increase your distances so you will be ready.
3. I like the Wing because I can stand while riding and you can throw on a lambs wool or more recently an Airhawk they breath and diminish getting a sweaty arse and decrease pressure.
4. Drink fluids regularly to prevent dehydration.
5. Start early I usually like to start a 4 am and ride with short stops to maximize day light and to minimize my night riding.
6. Multiple 1000 mile days I recommend you stop eat, shower and sleep. Several hours of sleep will refresh you.
7. I eat hard boiled eggs and bacon on the fly and I try to stay away from spicy foods, I do not recommend energy drinks or excessive coffee. (They can cause arrhythmias in excess) I learned that from experience.
8. Get your bike checked prior to leaving simple things tires, nuts and bolts, etc.
9. It is a marathon not a sprint (tortoise and the Hare)

10 Enjoy and be safe. (also have the gear you need for all temps& weather)
 

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Pam, I haven't seen any bad advice here. Mostly I will stress or reinforce a few points. The helmet fit is critical. Well vented, light weight helmets are good, but the comfort is critical.

I also use an Airhawk seat cushion. Its $100.00+, but I think its the best.

I've gotten into the habit that considering, after stops for gas, food, rr, and sometimes even a nap, I'll probably average roughly 50MPH over a long day. And maybe more for extreme heat, rain, or difficult winds. I plan my itinerary with that in mind.

Keep up with the weather forecast for the next couple of days. No matter where you go, if its for more than a weekend, you'll probably have to deal with rain. Just accept that it will happen. Prepare for it with rain gear and you can make that a part of the adventure.

Deer, and a few other small animals can be as much of a problem for an unprepared rider as cars and trucks, especially at night. Enjoy all of the glorious scenery, but watch the side of the road, as much as the road ahead.

Taking practice runs for training and conditioning can help if you can plan that far ahead. But the most important thing you'll gain will be confidence. Knowing what you can do with reasonable safety for both of you. Even more important than that is knowing what you're not ready for and what you MUST NOT DO. Its your ride. Stay within your limits and comfort zone and you and your daughter have memories for a lifetime.

You didn't mention when or where your going, but know that practically anywhere you go in North America, at least one us of is close by. This is a family and we are all ready to help each other any way we can. If you need directions, suggestion for lodging or food, our mechanical assistance.

Above all else, this your ride. Yours and your daughter's. Not ours. Think about all of the suggestions we make, but don't lose sight of rule #1.....Its your ride. You can make any and all adjustments you need to feel comfortable.

And finally, did I mention its your ride. Enjoy
 
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