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Discussion Starter #1
I can’t imagine that mine is the only one, so here it goes…

Problem: Intermittent stalling/start stall with or without touching the kill switch on the right handlebar.

Circumstances: I first noticed this when my Wing was only a couple months old (new leftover 08 purchased 02/10). I was approaching my garage, let go with the throttle hand to press the garage door opener button in my shirt pocket, and the bike died. This happened a couple of times and I couldn’t figure out why. Later, while putting my helmet on in the garage while the bike was running, I barely touched the kill switch on the right handlebar and the bike died. Started it again, touched the kill switch again, and again the bike died. When I say touched the switch, I mean literally place my finger on the top of the switch, I didn’t activate the switch, just touched it. Figuring that the contacts in the switch were somehow dirty, I cycled the switch back and forth several times and that seemed to cure the problem, except that I noticed that the switch didn’t need much deflection to kill the engine.

Months roll by, and I go through this switch cycling exercise several times, and this past Monday when leaving work the bike wouldn’t stay running. I fiddled with the switch quite a bit and finally got home, but the amount of fiddling required alarmed me and suggested that a permanent fix was in order.

Cure: While true my bike is still under the factory warranty, the fact that I don’t let other people work on my stuff required that I disassemble the switch pod and clean the contacts of the switch. This repair is not for the faint of heart as working within this switch pod is somewhat like working on a wristwatch, and booby-traps abound within. You can get the throttle cables disconnected from the throttle tube with the slack that the factory saw fit to leave us, without disassembling the whole bike to get to the throttle body cable adjustment, it just takes a bit of patients.

Remove the right handlebar end weight, hand brake lever, cable/brake hose guide cover on the underside of the right handlebar stand and the grip heater wire retainer on the right switch pod.

Remove the two switch pod mounting screws that are accessed from the bottom of the pod, open the pod by pulling the front of the lower half downward.

Once in the pod, remove the pod mounting bracket screw located in the upper half of the pod that is accessed from under the upper half of the pod to the rear of the handlebar. Remove the inner wiring harness stay located at the forward right side inside the lower half of the pod, this will give you the ability to open the pod further aiding in the service.

Loosen the throttle cable adjuster that is located on the cable and make sure that it is completely collapsed, meaning you’re giving the throttle cable maximum slack.

Here’s tricky part number one; getting the throttle cables free from the throttle tube. In my expearance, this was only possible if I opened the switch pod and lifted it up and over the throttle tube cam, allowing just enough slack to enable one of the cables to be freed from the tube due to the pod opening being allowed to get closer to the handlebar. Remove the throttle tube.

This is where things get real tricky. Study the routing of all wiring carefully, there’s a lot in there and it all needs to go back in the same spot. You’ll have to remove just about everything in the upper half of the switch pod to get access to the kill switch, be careful of the cruse on/off switch, it’s difficult to free from the housing and comes apart easily allowing all of the tiny bits to be set free.

Finally, the kill switch. Remove the e clip while holding the switch cap in place, again many small parts that want to disappear on you. Clean the switch contacts with a cloth and polish with a pencil eraser, apply some dielectric grease (not too much, just a dab will do ya) and reassemble.

Finally, before you start to reassemble anything else and while the upper half of the switch pod is free from the vehicle, loosen the throttle pull cable lock nut and give the upper half of the switch pod a couple of spins clockwise. The idea here is to give you some additional room for reassembly when reattaching the throttle cables. Just make sure the throttle cable housing doesn’t protrude too far into the housing to interfere with proper throttle operation, and that there’s enough thread left outside to screw the lock nut in place.

Simple huh?

Or just take to the dealer and hope that they get it right, odds are that they’ll just replace the assembly because technicians tend to throw parts at vehicles, not fix them. But then again, it was the new part that failed, and replacing with another doesn’t fix, or improve on anything.
 

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Step by step instructions are great Graves. Always feels better when you fix your own doesn't it?

Thanks for posting.
 

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You're a very patient and brave man graves. I trust my guys in the back for stuff like that, it scares the bejeebers outa me to do myself.:eek:
 

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I know the early 1800's had a recall on the kill switch, but I haven't heard of anyone, except you, that had a problem with later year 1800. I had an 08 and had no problems. Like you I do my own work but for something like that that could have run into big bucks if I messed it up while under warranty I would have taken it to the dealer. Of course that all depends on how much faith you have in your dealer, mine is great. And they not only work on Wings they are also a Kawasaki dealer so when I got my Concours 1400 I take that there also for any warranty work I need done.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I started my career as an auto mechanic in 1982, worked mostly independents up until 2001 when I went into government fleet, wrenched up until 2003 when I became a supervisor/fleet manager and haven’t “worked” in the shop since.

Fix it myself… I know no other way.

"...feels better when you fix your own doesn't it?..."
 
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