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Discussion Starter #1
I believe that the standard intergrated CB system is 27 Meg. I'd like to fit an intergrated UHF CB. Not at all keen on 27 Meg nowadays.

Does anyone have any info on if/what is available ?

:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
UHF in America went out with the dinosaur when cable TV came in.
Are you sure you don't mean 27 meg went out with the dinosaur ?

We used to use 27 in Oz about 30 years ago. Now it's all UHF, I reckon you'd be battling to find someone to talk to on 27 Meg nowadays.
:confused:
 

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Manxmann, I have a Uniden Handheld UHF mounted on the right handlebar which connects to the GL1500 audio system via a Starcom1 Goldwing enhancement unit.

Google Starcom1 to see what I mean. I expect there are other brands of boxes to do the same thing. I am having a few microphone probs with it, but as it was on the bike when I bought it, I'm not sure whether the prob is with the Honda or Starcom1 .

I agree with your comment on the demise of 27mhz popularity - in Australia at least. I suggest if you go UHF, go for an 80 ch unit rather than the cheaper (outdated for the last few months) 40 ch unit & go for the maximum 5w power. UHF is used by the truckies who are likely to be on any road a Goldwing would be using if you get into strife.
 

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here in the states you can't get these guys to talk on ssb
26w7673
 

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Military uses UHF lots, at least up here. Tacan signals are all UHF and if you're flying a small a/c across the Atlantic you need to have a UHF comm and the required tag behind antenna or you're 'dark' radio wise. Not sure about ground based UHF comms and licensing at least in Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, I am missing the point here a little.
Are your CB's in the USA mainly 27 Meg or 477Meg ?
 

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So, I am missing the point here a little.
Are your CB's in the USA mainly 27 Meg or 477Meg ?
our cb radios are mostly 27 meg. i'm not sure what frequency frs and gmrs operate on but truck drivers use 27meg radios
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for clearing that up for me. I am amazed that you stick to 27 Meg .

Cheers, :)
 

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our cb radios are mostly 27 meg. i'm not sure what frequency frs and gmrs operate on but truck drivers use 27meg radios
FRS freqs are 462.5625 Mhz to 467.7125 Mhz (Ch 1 through 14) ...GMRS freqs are 462.550 to 462.725 (Ch 15 through 22)..And the CB freqs here in the States is 26.965 to 27.405 Mhz. :)
 

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I give in ... what's FRS & GMRS ?

Further on. . . . I enquired -via PEI Canada - from a guy who is "into it" on the IOM & received the following :
UK truckers use 27Mhz, 477Mhz is in the 70cms band & NOT legal in UK. Don't think it is legal in U,S.without radio ham licence or Gov. licence. UHF is very short range & line of sight, unlike 27Mhz which will work to Aus if conditions are good.

Years ago, like in the mid 70's when 27 Meg was all the go in Oz, the sets had to be licensed. Despite the use of detecting vans & operators with more search & seize power than a copper, control & policing the regs became impossible. So in the end the law gave in to superior numbers & the need for a license was dropped. Even now, there is no requirement for CB to be licensed.

To get back to the original query about an intergrated UHF CB for me GW: It seems like it's gonna be a non-event !??

Thanks to you all for your input
 

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I give in ... what's FRS & GMRS ?

Further on. . . . I enquired -via PEI Canada - from a guy who is "into it" on the IOM & received the following :
UK truckers use 27Mhz, 477Mhz is in the 70cms band & NOT legal in UK. Don't think it is legal in U,S.without radio ham licence or Gov. licence. UHF is very short range & line of sight, unlike 27Mhz which will work to Aus if conditions are good.

Years ago, like in the mid 70's when 27 Meg was all the go in Oz, the sets had to be licensed. Despite the use of detecting vans & operators with more search & seize power than a copper, control & policing the regs became impossible. So in the end the law gave in to superior numbers & the need for a license was dropped. Even now, there is no requirement for CB to be licensed.

To get back to the original query about an intergrated UHF CB for me GW: It seems like it's gonna be a non-event !??

Thanks to you all for your input
I'm going with the MURS (Multi Use Radio System) radios which is VHF-hi, somewhere in/near the 150MHz range, and are usable throughout the US (except within 5 miles or so from the Canadian border) without a license. They're FM and run at 2 watts, compared to the FRS which is UHF at 500mW. I do believe you need a license for the GMRS, and no license is required for the FRS.
It would be nice if GL2way had this type of radio instead of the CB option, and you weren't forced to use some kind of a portable radio that was "patched in" to the GL2way with a special cable.
 

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There is quite a disconnect between countries and continents on which freq are in use.
In EU there is the PMR radio on uhf with a main freq of 446.00 which in North America is the main Ham simplex calling frequency. Australian CB is on 477 which is business band
in NA.
Band plans are very different depending on the part of the world you live.

I agree the GL2way may provide the best chance to interface your region's radio to the wing. We need to encourage GL2way to research and produce more radio cables
for the various regions and manufacturers.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I still don't know what FRS & GMRS stand for and now there's PMR as well !!!
C'mon fellas, let me in on it ??
 

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FRS - Family Radio Service (FRS) is one of the Citizens Band Radio Services. It is used by family, friends and associates to communicate within a neighborhood and while on group outings and has a communications range of less than one mile. You can not make a telephone call with an FRS unit. You may use your FRS unit for business-related communications.

Licensing - License documents are neither needed nor issued. You are provided authority to operate a FRS unit in places where the FCC regulates radio communications as long as you use only an unmodified FCC certified FRS unit. An FCC certified FRS unit has an identifying label placed on it by the manufacturer. There is no age or citizenship requirement.

Operations - You may operate your FRS unit within the territorial limits of the fifty United States, the District of Columbia, and the Caribbean and Pacific Insular areas ("U.S."). You may also operate your FRS unit on or over any other area of the world, except within the territorial limits of areas where radio- communications are regulated by another agency of the U.S. or within the territorial limits of any foreign government.
FRS/GMRS Dual Service Radios -

Some manufacturers have received approval to market radios that are certified for use in both the Family Radio Service (FRS) and the General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS). Other manufacturers have received approval of their radios under the GMRS rules, but market them as FRS/GMRS radios on the basis that:

Some channels are authorized to both services, or
A user of the radio may communicate with stations in the other service.

Radios marketed as "FRS/GMRS" or "dual-service radios" are available from many manufacturers and many retail or discount stores. The manual that comes with the radio, or the label placed on it by the manufacturer, should indicate the service the unit is certified for. If you cannot determine what service the unit may be used in, contact the manufacturer.

If you operate a radio that has been approved exclusively under the rules that apply to FRS, you are not required to have a license. FRS radios have a maximum power of ½ watt (500 milliwatt) effective radiated power and integral (non-detachable) antennas. If you operate a radio under the rules that apply to GMRS, you must have a GMRS license. GMRS radios generally transmit at higher power levels (1 to 5 watts is typical) and may have detachable antennas.
 

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Bloody hell .......... now I have the explanation !
Thanks for that DreamWeaver
No Problem.. The FRS/GMRS radios sell up here for $20 to $60 per pair. Hunters, hikers, campers, and a lot of people are going to them. They are cheap and work like a charm. Here is a link to Cobra where you can get some idea of what I'm talking about.
https://www.cobra.com/category/two-way-radios.cfm
 

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UHF for AUST

I still don't know what FRS & GMRS stand for and now there's PMR as well !!!
C'mon fellas, let me in on it ??


I have been following the information on this.

Would it not be possible to pull apart a UHF remote radio Mic. something like the ""UNIDEN UH7760NB UHF RADIO 80CH **SUPER COMPACT ** REMOTE MIC""

disconnect the wires and reconfigure them to GOLDWING standard plug configuration.
From what I can see on the original AM set up it dose not look to hard??

With a Short rubber Ground Independent Arial mounted anywhere on the bike ( top box Rack ) and the radio installed in the top box as usual.

Perhaps this would work for us down under.

I get my New WING next week and will be looking at this myself.
I'm not into the handle bar mounted setups if i can get away from it..
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Be real interested in what you can come up with BlueDog.

Intergrated UHF would be excellent.

Hope you enjoy your new wing ---- bet you just can't wait !?
 

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You blokes in WA are hard to please :)

Have a chat to Dale here. For a New South Welshman I've found him pretty helpful & always ready for a chat
 
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