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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings to all!
I am new to this site and pretty new to riding as well. I had a little trouble and was in need of finding a cheap way to get around. Gas was over $4.00 here and I don't make all that much money. A buddy told me about this motorcycle last May and as I was paying the widow for it, she informed me that her late husband had purchased it from a friend of mine that I used to play music with years ago. I had seen this bike about 5 years prior every Sunday. I know my friend took great care of it as did the fellow that owned it before me. I put new good tires on it and a battery and pretty much that was all it needed. It is so nice to have a form of transportation that doesn't have a huge oil slick under everywhere I park! This is kind of big for me to learn to ride on but I'm doing pretty good so far. I did dump it a few times learning to go slow but with practice, I'm getting much better. Gotta' watch those tight turns! I am really looking forward to traveling and seeing the country on this.
Be Safe!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hello

Hi Josh!
Thank you for your reply.
Man are you right when you say that "they" won't watch out for me.
Interstate exchanges seem to be the worst. People crossing 5 lanes without looking or giving notice.
As a novice rider, I am always asking other folks advice. The # 1 reply that I get is the same as yours. I thought about putting small letters along the top of my windshield that say,
"They are trying to kill you"!
Riding has really elevated my awareness of motorcycles while I am driving. One thing for sure, I don't pull out in front of one no matter how much room I have. Bikers go first! I live a mile from Natural Bridge State Park here in E. Kentucky. Today it is in the mid twenties. We got hit hard in our area by ice this week, and parts of the next county might not have power for a month. We only lost it for a day, but...
I was having to park the bike next to the trailer that I lived in. The owners of this camper had placed it next to a creek that floods. Being cold natured, I was required to put a heater and battery charger on the bike before it would start. 50 degrees and up, it starts as soon as I hit the switch. So, I get up the other morning to the creek on the rise. We had no power and the road to safety was covered in ice in one direction, and a foot of water in the other. Thank God we just got a tractor with a front loader. I was able to sling the crash bars and use the bucket to hoist the bike up to safety before the water got to it. Right now, I have it sitting next to the road. I'm worried about someone coming up at night with a truck and stealing it. As soon as I get a break in the weather, I can move it to a storage unit in Stanton. I'll have to use a gerarator to power the battery charger but that shouldn't be too hard. I have power in the storage unit so I can put a small heater in there to help keep the bike dry.
I can't wait for nicer days to get back out!
Eric
 

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hello and welcome to gwo forums eric. have you taken the mfs course? if not please do. what year is your wing and is it an aspencade, interstate or naked ( no fairing or bags )
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hello

As of right now I have not taken the course but for sure am going to. I live in a rural area so I might have to drive a bit to find one but I know it will be worth it. Right now, the weather is so bad here, I don't think the State Police are doing anything but dealing with the storm damage. Before this riding season starts, I plan on taking the course along with some in the shop time for the bike.
My Wing is a 1985 Interstate, wineberry in color. It has just over
90k. Other than a very small amount of rust on a few chrome parts, this bike is in perfect shape. There is a small hole that the fellow that rode it before me dirlled in the right saddle bag to run his oxygen hose out of. He rode this up until a few weeks before he passed away. I am pretty sure it has always been kept indoors. I met a fellow in Asheville last fall on my trip who told me that he had 230k on his 1984. He did say something about getting the timing belts looked at. Seeing how I do not know the maintaince histroy of this bike, I will most likely just have them replaced this spring before I start riding. I don't need to be replacing heads! There is a shop close to me that said they can do it but I would like to talk to a few or their customers before I turn them loose with my bike.
I am amazed at the nice people that I have met in the past few months while I have been out riding this thing!
 

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have the timing belts changed eric, if one breaks it will tear up the motor. honda has no interval for changing belts but a friend of mine changes his every 80,000 miles. if you don't know when they were changed change them
 

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Discussion Starter #7
timing belts

I hopt to have the bike gone over this spring. I have a large quanity of rock climbing gear that I used for a while that I'm trying to sell. If I can get what I'm hoping I'll have the funds to invest in getting this like new. The story of how I ended up with this is long but worthy of telling. I will at at later time, but if I'm right, this bike has been pampered all of it's life. Based on what I have herd about these, 90k is just getting broke in as long as they have been kept up. It really is the first thing I have owned in years the doesn't leave a oil slick where I park. I figure it's worth investing in so if things go my way, I can get everything gone over and have the faith in it that I'll be able travel. My first trip sure was a life changer. I hope to do more.
 

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Welcome to the GWO Forums, Eric!!! Enjoy! :D

By all means, do the MSF course! It's a great way to learn, or re-learn, and freshen up on safety issues, such as the slow speed maneuvers! Ya gotta watch for the "other guy" in the cars/trucks, for sure. They either wanna hit ya from behind, or they'll hit ya from the side trying to pass. I'm in the Dallas area of Texas, so traffic here might be a little more congested/dangerous than where you are, but...it only takes ONE to ruin yer day!
Ride Safe!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
MSF course

Thank you for your reply!
I have signed up for the first course that Morhead State University is having this year. It should happen around the first of April. I'm really looking forward to learning as much as I can about this. I studied under some very experienced rock climbers for a year before I started to lead climb. Knowledge=Power. The things I learned in that year of apprentiship have kept my alive while climbing and photographing 600 feet off the deck. Riding is way more dangerous than climbing so the more I can learn now, the better my chances of sucess. The tips that I have picked from other riders have been a wonderful help so far. There is no substute for experience. My friend that helped me with getting set up on this is a life time rider. "Slow and Easy", I have heard his voice in my head over and over. Good advice. The times I have had trouble are always when I get in too much of a hurry. I believe the slow speed maneuvering skills I'll pick up will be worth the cost of the class.
 
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