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Just wanted some input here.....I have a 2003 that I would like to install the Hondaline heated grips, but I hear of some controller issues. Is there a better heated grip? Thanks for sharing.

rob
 

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Not sure about brands, but there's literally dozens of different grip heaters. I'd check Electrical Connection and see what they might offer
 

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First, welcome to the forum from your neighbor to the east. I've got the OEM heated grips on my 2009 and they work really well. Can't speak for other brands. The heated seat is also a nice thing on cold mornings...
 

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Welcome to GWOF from Maryland , I haven't used my heated grips yet so I don't no how they will work this
Fall
 

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Thanks gentlemen, I'm leaning towards the Gerbing heated jacket liner and gloves. That way my hands will be warm all over. Also thanks for the warm(pardon the pun)welcome. Just bought the wing in August and I'm over 3k miles so far.

rob
 

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I love my Gerbing heated gloves and coat liner. When it is cold and raining, like it often is in Seattle, keeping my palms warm would not be enough.

In the early fall and spring, I use the handle bar booties when I am running errands on the bike so that I don't have to keep putting the gloves on and off.... kind a like the cops do in the winter time.
 

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I have a wing with heated grips and a pair of Gerbing gloves up here in Connecticut where it's already in the 40's (Ct rule of riding: when planning a ride, take 20 degrees off the air temp and dress accordingly.) I like that the gloves warm the tops of my hands and fingers. But those metal grips can be cold too so it's nice to warm them.

Personally, I find that the lower fairings keeping the wind off my legs is the best thing about a Goldwing making the riding season a little longer.
 

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I've always thought if I need heated grips, then what I really need is better gloves. We have Gerbing jackets and that was a smart buy. Several of the bikes in my chapter have heated grips, but every one of those riders also has Gerbing gloves. And the the gloves are much more effective sitting in the stands at the high school football game.

Ride safe
 

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Thanks gentlemen, I'm leaning towards the Gerbing heated jacket liner and gloves. That way my hands will be warm all over. Also thanks for the warm(pardon the pun)welcome. Just bought the wing in August and I'm over 3k miles so far.

rob
You just answered for me. That is the best combination. You will be so cozy.
 

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On my recent trip to Texas and back, I brought along my pant liners and boot inserts. The inserts never got out of the pack. The pant liners were put on a few days as I thought it looked to be necessary, but in the end, I didn't turn those on and after awhile, I dressed without them on.

The biggie, was the coat liner and gloves. Toasty.
 

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Two prime regions of the body to protect from cold: body core and extremities (fingers/toes). Core temp is a no brainer as you're risking hypothermia. But if your fingers and toes get cold, misery will be your pillion the whole way. Fingers are typically more sensitive to the elements as you use them more when riding, and boots are usually thicker and more weather resistant and wind proof. Couple areas that can get easily overlooked is your throat and cheeks. any snowmobiler will tell you that frostbite on the cheeks and throat is a very real threat at 20 below. Couple sub zero temps with 60+ mph and you have frozen flesh just waiting to happen. That's certainly more extreme conditions than m/c riders face, but windchill factors start coming into play at well above freezing ambient temps. Be careful!
 

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Two prime regions of the body to protect from cold: body core and extremities (fingers/toes). Core temp is a no brainer as you're risking hypothermia. But if your fingers and toes get cold, misery will be your pillion the whole way. Fingers are typically more sensitive to the elements as you use them more when riding, and boots are usually thicker and more weather resistant and wind proof. Couple areas that can get easily overlooked is your throat and cheeks. any snowmobiler will tell you that frostbite on the cheeks and throat is a very real threat at 20 below. Couple sub zero temps with 60+ mph and you have frozen flesh just waiting to happen. That's certainly more extreme conditions than m/c riders face, but windchill factors start coming into play at well above freezing ambient temps. Be careful!
I get it. You are saying we should do in the winter time what the Harley riders do in the summer? We are supposed to ride our bikes to the closest bar and park in front?
 

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Lots of Barley riders spend enough time 'in' the bar they don't notice the cold (joke). Certainly don't recommmend riding home from the bar:rolleyes:
 
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