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Towed jumper has given a great gem of wisdom, buy the bike you want and learn to ride it and I totally agree.
 
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Hello all.

I've been really fascinated by the Goldwing and thinking of buying one. But as the title says, I don't own a bike and have probably ridden a bike 5-10 times in my life( Royal Enfield)

I went and felt the bike out at the dealership last week,it felt comfortable and a bit intimidating at the same time.

I definitely am not the show off type that'll take bike for fancy manouvers without experience.

Given that info would you suggest it is a first bike?..i know the answer but would like the great the community thoughts.

I don't want to buy multiply bikes as progression.
Many (probably most) wouldn't have recommended that I start out with an FJR 1300 as a first bike but because I bought a bike that COULD take me across the country and back I was able to do just that. In many ways, I would say the Goldwing is a more forgiving first motorcycle than an FJR. The high center of gravity with Engine sitting vertical and fuel on top of that make the 640 odd pounds of the FJR's weight feel like more than a goldwing. Also, once you tip it into a corner it takes more to get it back up.

Whatever you choose, buy a bike you will ride more or its a wasted purchase and I think thats what you were trying to avoid. That's your decision point I think.
 

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In the end it is your money I have never considered working my way up to a bike as I have stated before I learned to ride on a 46 Indian Chief and never had a any bike I can remember under 200cc and that was a dirt bike. I wish you the best of luck.👍
 

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1996 Honda GoldWing Interstate, Candy Spectra Red, and of course, with drive shaft.
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And yet I almost dropped my GL1500 this evening in a pull-out turn, despite having years of experience with my GL1000 (although, as previously noted, almost 30 years without, so I’m still not at full strength, and I had a hip replaced 6 months ago, so....). As I said earlier, GoldWings are a handful. So getting some practice on a closed course would be really beneficial.
 

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One more tip on slow speed maneuvering is to do it in 2nd gear. 1st gear has far too much torque for me to have good throttle control.
 

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There is a fantastic You tube and Facebook page called "Preload and keep it Loaded". I have been studying it and also practicing the technique given. It is given by a retired NYPD Motor Policeman, Robert Simmons, and he gets into very explicit description on how to maneuver at slow speed effectively. What is cool (and my brother and I are going to make an effort to go this year), is he does free "practice sessions" in Pooler Georgia. It's all about working the clutch in the friction zone (Preload and keeping it Loaded), staying in first gear, and working the rear brake. I have looked at a few You tube variants of the same thing, and they all pretty much are in agreement on how to ride and maneuver slow, but Robert is more eye to eye, realistic and fun, as an instructor (to me anyway) .

You get a chance, check him out. It is kind of addicting too, watching the progression of riders at different levels of learning.
 

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There is a fantastic You tube and Facebook page called "Preload and keep it Loaded". I have been studying it and also practicing the technique given. It is given by a retired NYPD Motor Policeman, Robert Simmons, and he gets into very explicit description on how to maneuver at slow speed effectively. What is cool (and my brother and I are going to make an effort to go this year), is he does free "practice sessions" in Pooler Georgia. It's all about working the clutch in the friction zone (Preload and keeping it Loaded), staying in first gear, and working the rear brake. I have looked at a few You tube variants of the same thing, and they all pretty much are in agreement on how to ride and maneuver slow, but Robert is more eye to eye, realistic and fun, as an instructor (to me anyway) .

You get a chance, check him out. It is kind of addicting too, watching the progression of riders at different levels of learning.
That's the technique, and look where you want to go. If you look down, that's where you will go, so don't do that. Thanks for the tip on where to look for the training.
 
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