Honda Goldwing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings!
I'm a new member here seeking advice before I buy a Gold Wing. I have wanted one for many years and am ready for it. The problem I'm having is that I don't know much about them and am stuck between spending a lot of money to buy a newer one - around 2010 or newer, or buy an older one and save money but still partake in the pleasure of having a reliable, comfortable touring bike.

I really like how the 90's look but wonder if all the bells and whistles that come with the new ones are worth spending the money on them.

I have in mind a 1996 and a 1998. There's also a 2010 and a 2012 that I like.

Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated!

-Octavio
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
There is no doubt that the 1500 were/are a glorious machine for long distant touring and leisurely laid back interstate travel. But the 1800 with fuel injection sure makes for a snappy experience in riding backroads, through the curves, and cutting the twists. There is also the getting replacement parts. With a few exceptions, the 1800's share many overlapping components (2001-2017). After 2006 there were larger radiators, cooling fans, and audio speakers as well as a wider range of options - basic all the way to an airbag model.

I'm very happy with 2004 - it runs as if I picked it up at the dealer this morning (I'm the original owner). I have made some upgrades over the years - my recent addition was cutting the cable. I now have a Sena 50s and Sena Freewire that connects all of the Wing audio and intercom components to my headset. I can communicate with the newer Wing owners who have open MESH (I haven't ran into anyone with Cardo to see if connecting to DMC is just a simple) and still use my CB for the pre 2018's.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,328 Posts
First of all, welcome to the forum.

Having owned both the GL1500 and the GL1800, I would say it depends on many factors. Including how much you ride. The GL1800 is less prone to problems if it sits in winter storage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
I ride a 2013 that I bought in 2015
Before that I had a 98 se

I would say buy the newest you are willing to afford

as was said, the parts for newer bikes are more available, but you never really have to do much about general maintenance, so that point is almost mute but
should be a consideration in my book, plus, how much are you willing to do the wrench twisting, some places won't work on the older bikes
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
As a 1500 owner I will offer this. The 1500's are a great machine, but in this today's world you need to be prepared to do your own mechanic work. It will be difficult t I find a shop that will do needed work. Additionally, body parts and certain other items will have you scouting Ebay, and it Salvage sites for used items because many are now unavailable from Honda.

Now I am not trying to dissuade you, just giving you some info I have encountered.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
Greetings!
I'm a new member here seeking advice before I buy a Gold Wing. I have wanted one for many years and am ready for it. The problem I'm having is that I don't know much about them and am stuck between spending a lot of money to buy a newer one - around 2010 or newer, or buy an older one and save money but still partake in the pleasure of having a reliable, comfortable touring bike.

I really like how the 90's look but wonder if all the bells and whistles that come with the new ones are worth spending the money on them.

I have in mind a 1996 and a 1998. There's also a 2010 and a 2012 that I like.

Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated!

-Octavio
The 1500’s have better wind protection, the 96 has black gauges, the 98 has white gauges, you do know that 1500’s are carbureted and 1800’s are fuel injected. I truly believe the 1500 is more forgiving than the 1800, and both have been super reliable over the years. Remember that anything older than 10 years may not be serviced at Honda dealers, so that’s 2013 and up now. Service is more involved on an 1800, and electrical issues are more costly too. Parts availability is becoming equal on the model years you are interested in. mileage/condition/cold start performance/careful fluid inspection and corrosion come to mind when inspecting candidates for purchase. As long a test ride as they will let you do, is also key. I had them do a ‘ride along’ with me, and we changed bikes so that they could experience it. I also learned that they could ride, so it was easier letting a stranger ride my ‘for sale’ bike. Good luck with your search and shopping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
the lowest prices, if you can find one, will be over the winter months (no demand) and early spring before the riding season really gets into full swing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,734 Posts
Welcome from the northern tier of PA. I agree with Cantankerous and Fossil. I owned 89 1500 and it was a great bike but after winter storage the back brake would be flat and need serviced. I now have a 12 1800 with ABS brakes and like it a lot. Both a good bikes but as Fossil said you may have to do your own wrenching on a 1500. Good luck with your search.
 

·
Registered
2000 GL1500SE
Joined
·
75 Posts
I bought my 2000 model 1500 for 3500 bucks. that leaves a LOT of cash in my pocket. I do my own maintenance, but these bikes are pretty bullet-proof if you take care of them. I'm doing IBA long distance rides on mine and don't fret a bit. My wife also loves the rear seat and has fallen asleep because it's that comfortable and smooth. if you want to do curvy back roads, the 1800 would be a better option. I have an alternate bike for doing that.

1800s are wonderful bikes. I just can't justify the cost of them for my circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,533 Posts
Welcome to the forum. 1800s are all great bikes. I have a 2012 (which is considered the start of the second generation of the 1800s) and I have not had any problems with my dealer providing service. I am wondering if the reluctance to service a bike is more related to the basic design. I suspect that most dealers will service any 1800 but I have no data to go on besides my own dealer. Perhaps others that have different experiences will chime in to help you decide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Greetings!
I'm a new member here seeking advice before I buy a Gold Wing. I have wanted one for many years and am ready for it. The problem I'm having is that I don't know much about them and am stuck between spending a lot of money to buy a newer one - around 2010 or newer, or buy an older one and save money but still partake in the pleasure of having a reliable, comfortable touring bike.

I really like how the 90's look but wonder if all the bells and whistles that come with the new ones are worth spending the money on them.

I have in mind a 1996 and a 1998. There's also a 2010 and a 2012 that I like.

Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated!

-Octavio
Welcome to the GWO.
 

·
Registered
1994 Goldwing Trik
Joined
·
14 Posts
First of all, welcome to the forum.

Having owned both the GL1500 and the GL1800, I would say it depends on many factors. Including how much you ride. The GL1800 is less prone to problems if it sits in winter storage.
I agree with Cantankerous. I have a 1500 and love it, has 115K miles but I also live in Oklahoma where we have a lot of days through the winter that I'm able to ride, longest it has sat maybe a couple of weeks.
 

·
Registered
2000 GL1500SE
Joined
·
3 Posts
Greetings!
I'm a new member here seeking advice before I buy a Gold Wing. I have wanted one for many years and am ready for it. The problem I'm having is that I don't know much about them and am stuck between spending a lot of money to buy a newer one - around 2010 or newer, or buy an older one and save money but still partake in the pleasure of having a reliable, comfortable touring bike.

I really like how the 90's look but wonder if all the bells and whistles that come with the new ones are worth spending the money on them.

I have in mind a 1996 and a 1998. There's also a 2010 and a 2012 that I like.

Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated!

-Octavio
I recently brought a 2000 SE1500

same thought processes- “shall I go newer”

As I can spanner on the bike, and given its condition - before purchase, it wasn’t a hard choice really.

having not ridden the early gen 1800 - the 1500 seems to scratch through the twists with a good level of grip, and it’s perfect for general blasting, touring.
Parts in NZ are scarce now - but shipped from Auz or US seems quick and painless.

It would be nice to have some newer tech (ABS a better stereo) but so far no issues, and with the cost difference- an aftermarket radio set up is within low budget DIY cost.
Don’t write the 1500’s off just yet. Can still be set up and be a great bike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you all very much for your support- it has been very helpful.

I have more than one road motorcycle so the Goldwing will not be ridden very often.

At this moment I am undecided. I am contemplating the following bikes:

A) 1996 for $3000 with around 86k miles
B) 1998 for $4300 with around 52k miles
C) 2003 for $4900 with around 67k miles.

My wife and I plan on taking the Goldwing on road trips during the summer. I want to make a smart purchase, which bike would be the best investment for my use?

Once again, thank you in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,533 Posts
Thank you all very much for your support- it has been very helpful.

I have more than one road motorcycle so the Goldwing will not be ridden very often.

At this moment I am undecided. I am contemplating the following bikes:

A) 1996 for $3000 with around 86k miles
B) 1998 for $4300 with around 52k miles
C) 2003 for $4900 with around 67k miles.

My wife and I plan on taking the Goldwing on road trips during the summer. I want to make a smart purchase, which bike would be the best investment for my use?

Once again, thank you in advance!
The 2003 is fuel injected (no carb issues) and most dealers will still work on them if needed. The mileage on any of them simply means that they are broken in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I bought my current bike from a private owner and as part of the process I had a long talk with him to get to know what kind of a person he is, how much he cared for his bikes (he had 3) and so on. "Interviewing" him really helped me decide to go forward with the purchase. Turns out he was a prosecuting atty in his 30's with a family, owned his house, very stable and upright guy. He was very open about the bike and had all the service records. He also just had the bike serviced at his local BMW dealership and had their inspection sheet that went over the brakes, tires, electrical and all the other components so I felt confident about what I was buying.
I really believe asking the current owner to have the bike serviced at a dealership, whether it's needed or not, is key to your decision. Getting a professional "once over" and seeing all the green checkmarks on the sheet will give you confidence, it did for me anyway.
Just a thought.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top