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I just received one of the spin on filter adapters from Randakk's and have a question about filter use. My preference is Wix filters. I've been cross-referencing part numbers from some of the Fram, Purolator & AC Delco numbers that are on the installation sheet from Randakk's. I came up with several Wix filters that will work but some of them are listed as having an Anti Drain Back Valve and others aren't. Can anyone offer any pros or cons to using a filter with an Anti Drain Back Valve on the GL1200? The main reason I ask is because one of the filters has a burst strength of about 100psi more than the others and is a few hundredths of an inch thicker so should be less likely to be punctured from anything the front tire may kick up but this filter has the Anti Drain Back Valve.

Thanks

Hoss
 

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Here is an explanation of the Anti-Drain Back Valve...commonly called a Check Valve in other places but that is basically what it does. You want Filters w/Anti-Drain Back Valves in them.

ANTI DRAIN BACK VALVES
Finally, some oil filters come with an anti- drain back valve. This is not necessary in a filter which is mounted vertically, with the opening pointed up. However, most motorcycles mount their filters horizontally, so this is very important to us. This is typically a piece of nitrile or silicon rubber which blocks off the filter oil inlets unless there is positive pressure into the filter. After you have used a filter for a while, if it's doing it's job, the filter is full of these 20 to 50 micron particles which mean death for your bearings. If you were to ever run the oil through this filter backwards, these particles would be released into the engine almost all at once. This "would be bad." When you turn off your engine, if the filter has no anti-drain back valve, whatever oil is in the filter will drain back into the oil pan, bringing with it a whole bunch of really evil junk.
 

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I just received one of the spin on filter adapters from Randakk's and have a question about filter use. My preference is Wix filters. I've been cross-referencing part numbers from some of the Fram, Purolator & AC Delco numbers that are on the installation sheet from Randakk's. I came up with several Wix filters that will work but some of them are listed as having an Anti Drain Back Valve and others aren't. Can anyone offer any pros or cons to using a filter with an Anti Drain Back Valve on the GL1200? The main reason I ask is because one of the filters has a burst strength of about 100psi more than the others and is a few hundredths of an inch thicker so should be less likely to be punctured from anything the front tire may kick up but this filter has the Anti Drain Back Valve.

Thanks

Hoss
Hoss,

I would run with the WIX if you are not going to use the AMSOIL filter.

I had a 1200 and was looking at putting that system on but sold the bike. I think there were 2 companies that I found, one Canadian utilizing a Metric Thread and the other was a US company using a 3/4-16 thread.

If yours is the 3/4-16, there are several Ford and Dodge filters that will fit, have the proper pressure differential and the Anti Drain Back valve.

If you would like to give me the current filter Part #, I will try to look up the proper filter. [email protected]

As for Burst vs: Puncture, these could be 2 different scenarios. The Burt could be at the seam where the can is connected to the base plate.

What I have seen is that a piece of PVC will fit certain filters if a slit is made so it will expand over the filter. One big problem I see with that is that the filter is used to help cool the oil.

The Best isn't cheap
Cheap isn't The Best


Bob
 

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Anti Drain Valve is a good thing! You want that if it is affordable. You will also want to check on the micron rating of the filter. Amsoil sold a kick ass filter for my previous V-Twin Evo Engine. I found out later it was such a low micron (good for filtering out crap but) that the oil pressure couldnt push enough oil through the filter fast enough for proper filtration. Basically the engine would starve for lubrication in certain key areas and oil leakes would begin in other places. I read later to use a specific micron rating for Evo engines to help stop this issue. I switched filters and cleaned the engine and never had an oil leak problem again. I love Amsoil products! They just missed the boat a little on that one. So check the actual needs and address odd concerns to make sure your new oil filter doesn't filter so small or slowly that it creates any new issues for that engine! I use 15w40 oil and the cheapest filter I can find. But I add a can of STP oil additive to get more friction modifiers and change my oil & filter every 3,000 to 4,000 miles. Thats just me !
 

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I also have the spin-on adapter on my GL1200. Recently I have read that it may not be good to use the Mobil1 and Pure1 oil filters on Motorcycles unless they are motorcycle specific filters.
I am currently running a M1-301 (I think).
After doing some reading I would like to change it to a less restrictive filter.
Anyone else have a recommendation?
I see that the Randakk is running the pf2951 on his Kompressor GL1000. I had a Fram burst once a car and will never use another one.
Anyone else?
 

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There are 2 basic kits that I am aware of. One is Metric thread, the other, that you have is SAE 3/4-16.

It takes a common Ford Filter such as a WIX 51515 or NAPA Gold 1515, Motorcraft FL-1A etc...

Do not look at something like a newer Ford Truck as they use Metric filters since around 93.

Any V-8 Ford Car in the 70's should have that filter. Dodge is the same way, just slightly shorter.

Do not use a Pure One

AMSOIL EAO-15 is the Ford Filter, EAO-42 is the Chrysler filter.. The AMSOIL filter is the best money can buy. Conservatively Rated at 15 Micron Absolute and flows as well or better than an OEM Filter.

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Bob
 

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Just changed my filter last weekend. I was told by the parts guy that Fram uses a lot of plastic stuff inside the cannister. A friend was using Fram in a hot rod and he was getting on it and noticed the oil pressure dropped quick so he hit the kill switch and they towed the car home. Upon inspection they found the inside of the oil filter had pulled loose and the plastic screen and paper filter was being sucked into the engine. Fortunately by shutting down immediately he was able to save his $20,000 engine! This is what I was told, however it helped me decide on a different filter. A filter that is all metal construction inside and out! So whatever you decide on - DON'T go with a Fram at this time.
 

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Silver Eagle,

Your friends story is not all that unique. The Fram filter has been known to come apart and cause engine damage. They don't filter worth a darn either.

Fram makes a decent 'Truck" filter but their automotive filters are riding on that reputation. Hot glued end caps and a 36-42 Micron Rating do not cut it in todays vehicles.

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Bob
 

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Amsoil for Early Wings -

Please don't misunderstand my previous statement on Amsoil. I have used amsoil products for 20 or more years and still do today. The oil and filters are second to None! I use the filters and oil in my Truck, Car, & Motorcycles. However the micron filtering in the filter for my Evo Engine was just a little to tight for proper flow in that specific model American Evo V-twin. Using a different filter cured the leak issus at the cost of dirtier oil of course. That created more oil changes which resulted in higher expense as I used the Amsoil 20-50 V-twin oil in that bike. However that filter worked perfectly for the Twin Cam V-twin engines so I simply traded with a local bike shop and everything was good. It was a learning experience I simply wanted to share with a newer biker on this forum. However now we all have Vintage Goldwings so there are different concerns and needs.

In Fact I have a question for Amsoil. For a 1976 Goldwing with 40,000 miles - what is the recommended Amsoil Oil and should it be mixed 50-50 with petro based oil to creat a blend? I have read where pure high quality synthetic oil in an older engine has such a superior cleaning affect that it will actually cause an older engine to start leaking. I have seen this first-hand with original muscle cars from the 60s and 70s. Then there is the concerns that the slicker oil will cause the clutches to slip. All this because synthetic did not exist when these old bikes were designed and so they were designed with the older petro based lubes that were all that was available at that time. So - what about blending for our vintage bikes? Pros and Cons? And tho these are motorcycles it is a car engine. So which Amsoil products are preferred for the early wings?
 

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Amsoil Dealer: What your beef with Pure One? Just bashing it or have something constructive to say!
Carl, if you would just ask a question in a civil manner instead of ASSuming, it would be a lot better for all.

Purolator says DO NOT use the Pure One filter on a Motorcycle !!!!!!!! Not Me.

The Pure One is an Excellent Filter for a Car or Light Truck. So good that if the AMSOIL EA Series was not available, I would use it.

But, seeing that this is a Motorcycle Forum and Purolator Corporate (Not Me) says DO NOT use as it may cause oil pressure problems, I, surely would NOT make a recommendation to use an improper product.

Purolator has a Specific line, ML, for Powersports applications. No, it is not as good as the Pure One, but it is the proper product from Purolator.

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Bob
 

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Please don't misunderstand my previous statement on Amsoil. I have used amsoil products for 20 or more years and still do today. The oil and filters are second to None! I use the filters and oil in my Truck, Car, & Motorcycles. However the micron filtering in the filter for my Evo Engine was just a little to tight for proper flow in that specific model American Evo V-twin. Using a different filter cured the leak issus at the cost of dirtier oil of course. That created more oil changes which resulted in higher expense as I used the Amsoil 20-50 V-twin oil in that bike. However that filter worked perfectly for the Twin Cam V-twin engines so I simply traded with a local bike shop and everything was good. It was a learning experience I simply wanted to share with a newer biker on this forum. However now we all have Vintage Goldwings so there are different concerns and needs.

In Fact I have a question for Amsoil. For a 1976 Goldwing with 40,000 miles - what is the recommended Amsoil Oil and should it be mixed 50-50 with petro based oil to creat a blend? I have read where pure high quality synthetic oil in an older engine has such a superior cleaning affect that it will actually cause an older engine to start leaking. I have seen this first-hand with original muscle cars from the 60s and 70s. Then there is the concerns that the slicker oil will cause the clutches to slip. All this because synthetic did not exist when these old bikes were designed and so they were designed with the older petro based lubes that were all that was available at that time. So - what about blending for our vintage bikes? Pros and Cons? And tho these are motorcycles it is a car engine. So which Amsoil products are preferred for the early wings?
I am pretty sure the filter you had problems with was the SMF which is no longer made. Have not heard of any problems with the EA Series and we have them assembled by a different company.

AMSOIL MCF 10W-40 is what I used in my GL-1200 and is what I would recommend for you even though you could run the MCT 10W-30 with no problems.

I stayed with the cartridge filter and would never do that again.

I NEVER recommend blending ANY oils. Different additive packs can have an adverse effect on the oil itself.

As for leaks.... Synthetic oil does not 'cause' leaks but it will find where the paraffin from regular oil has coagulated in a leak, if there is one,and clean it out. Not speaking for any other oils but AMSOIL, has a very high seal swell additive package and will actually make seals pliable again over time and allow them to work again.

As for clutch slippage.... It is another Myth as long as it is a Motorcycle Specific oil with a JASO MA Rating or MA 2 with MA 2 being the highest clutch performance rating available today.

My 1200 had a slight clutch slippage problem when I power shifted at Full Throttle when I bought it. I rode it about 400 miles or so before I changed the oil, even though it had just been serviced, to the MCF. After about 1700 miles, there was no clutch slippage.

As matter of fact, a guy I know was running the 10W-30 auto oil in his 1200, before we had the MCF and had to change the Stator. Well you have to pull the clutch assembly on the 1200 so he figured with 192,000 on the clock, he may as well change the clutch.

The new clutch Mic'd out thinner than the old clutch..

Hope this answered your questions, I have almost 100 emails to answer..

The Best isn't cheap
Cheap isn't The Best


Bob
 

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Bob, what's the part # for the Amsoil filter for an '09 1800? I thought I had it marked down but I lost it:(
 

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Thanks a million, I've got it saved now
 
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