Honda Goldwing Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Dumb question for you: I have a new (to me) 98 GW 1500 Aspencade that came with a 2000 owner's manual. The manual states using 87 octane while the label on the inside of the side cover (which may or may not be original) says to use 91 octane. I have checked around but can't find the correct information (I'll guess I'll have to break down and get the owner's manual for the 98 GW one of these days). Any information on the correct octane rating for this bike would be most appreciated.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
89 is correct, I have used it in all my Gold Wings, all 6 of them. I have never seen a lable on any side cover, can you post a picture of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
... Howdy ... My 85 1200 Ltd Has Fuel Injection And Have Been Using Regular 87 Oct. ... Doesn't Ping And Plenty Of Getup And Go ... I Too Have Never Seen A Octane Label ... Happy Trails ...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
576 Posts
My '94 has the 91 octane lable on the inside of the fuel door, next to the paint code. I've used 87- 93 octane in my bike can't tell a bit of difference in mileage or performance, so I just use the cheap stuff.Do your own test and see what works for you.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,240 Posts
i use 93 octain in all the bikes. the 750's run better with the higher octain and i'm sure the wings would run just fine with 87 octain but just to simplify things all motorcycles get 93
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
The recommended gasoline for most cars is regular 87 octane. One common misconception is that higher octane gasoline contains more cleaning additives than lower octane gas. All octane grades of all brands of gasoline contain engine cleaning detergent additives to protect against engine deposit build-up. In fact, using a gasoline with too high of an octane rating may cause damage to the emissions system.
Certain high performance engines benefit from use of high octane fuel. For other engines, using a fuel with a higher octane rating than the vehicle requires sends unburned fuel into the emissions system and catalytic converter. This puts unecessary stress on the emissions system. For some vehicles, a rotten egg smell coming from the tailpipe signals use of too-high octane gas

Octane rating of a spark ignition engine fuel is the detonation resistance (anti-knock rating) compared to a mixture of iso-octane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane, an isomer of octane) and n-heptane. By definition, iso-octane is assigned an octane rating of 100, and heptane is assigned an octane rating of zero. An 87-octane gasoline, for example, possesses the same anti-knock rating of a mixture of 87% (by volume) iso-octane, and 13% (by volume) n-heptane. This does not mean, however, that the gasoline actually contains these hydrocarbons in these actual proportions. It simply means that it has the same detonation resistance properties as the described 'standard' defined mixture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, everyone. Like Matt, my label says 91 octane gas (but mine is on the left side cover). I've used 87 and 93 and can't really tell any major difference. I'll stick with the 87 octane (good old regular gas) for a while and see how it does.

Thanks again,
Jon
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,855 Posts
I ran 87 octane in my 98 GL1500 SE and never had a problem. As long as the Wing is happy, I'm happy. Why spend more for higher octane when you don't need it.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top