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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been having problems with the left front shock absorber, on my 2010 model Goldwing (ABS), The oil seal keeps failing. I have replaced it three times, before suspecting a bent shaft. So I bought a complete new left shock and again within a month the seal failed. Have had no problem with the right one. I live in Nigeria, and yes the roads are bad, with the occasional sneaky pot hole. I am a hard rider, and weave in and out of traffic (that's allowed here), with a lot of hard braking. Has anyone else had this problem ? Is there a solution (perhaps, different seal, springs, complete heavy duty shock unit etc). Because every time in leaks, the air flow brings the fluid up through the stearing column, on to me and the bike. Nasty
 

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I don't have a solution, but shouldn't that be covered under warranty on a 2010 Wing??
 

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hello bayobanjo, welcome to GWOF
 

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Before we get mixed up here, are we talking clutch side or front brake side. If it your clutch side, the fix is simple
 

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No real dealer for honda bikes here, we usually order farts from the US or UK, I bought the bike from a dealer in Boston
Hello, and welcome to the Forum from Texas. We don't have a need to import farts around here; no shortage locally. I'm an old fart myself.
I know it's a typo, but I just couldn't resist!
 

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Thanks, but what does this do ? Disable the anti dive or reduces its effect
Here is the explaination from Wingstuff website:

Honda GL1800 Gold Wing Anti-Dive Fork Valve Shim eliminates the harsh ride in front end of your bike when you are on rough road, railroad tracks or making a turn. Works off the rear brake and restricts the flow in the left fork and prevents it from moving. Made of heavy duty aluminum. There is no need to modify, just insert it between the two valves. It comes with two longer stainless steel bolts to replace the original. It is very easy to install just four bolts to remove the front fender and only takes about 10 minutes and can be removed at anytime. Comes with 2 bolts 20 x 5 mm (about 1/8" longer than the stock screws).
 

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Exactly what they said, which is why I had you specify if it was clutch side, etc (instead of right/left). Unfortunately, you will still have to replace your seals on the antidive side after you install the disable washer from Wingstuff. The stock antidive system hydralically locks up your forks under certain instances when your brakes are applied. Unfortunately, the seals cannot handle the pressure buildup and fail, causing leakage. Your ride will smooth out considerably after installation.
 

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First, test to see if the ADV is OK or not. Get on the bike. Stand it up. Apply the front brake. Then push the front forks down and let them up as hard as you can, rapidly. The forks should compress a couple times before locking up. If so, your ADV is working fine and does not not to be disabled!
There are many that have wrongly blamed the ADV for front suspension problems, IMHO.
With scheduled maintainance performed, properly, the ADV works as intended. Which is to restrict the compression of the forks during extreem hard braking, especially if the surface is rough/uneven.
Now, having said all that, you state your riding seems to be the exact conditions that would cause the ADV to almost constantly restrict the front suspension. In that case, it may be advisible to try shimming the ADV for a good test to see if that in deed cures your seal failures.
When you state you replace the left (we call them fork assemblies here in the States) did you mean the whole assembly, the internal parts or just the fork tube?
If you replaced the shaft and all internal parts resulting in another failure, that narrows things that could cause the failures down.
 

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What I did is referred to as the nickel trick. Take a nickel and drill a 7/32" hole (I think a 1/4" will work if you don't have that bit) in the center of a nickel and place it between the 2 halves of the anti-dive. My ride is not nearly as harsh now. Like day and night. Only costs a nickel and easily reversed if you want to. You can also reuse the 2 long screws that hold the anti dive together as they are still long enough.
 

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Don't disable the Anti Dive until you put in some better springs. Disabling it with out better stiffer springs is creating a dangerous situation, the bike will really dive down with the weak front factory springs. I would suggest to install a set of Progressives, RaceTech and then disable the Anti Dive. The Anti Dive sticks and causes your shock on that side to lock up and inevitably blows your seals.
 

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The vast majority of Wing owners who disable their ADV (anti dive valve) do so using the stock spring. Most report a much better ride. Here's a video of my front suspension in action with the ADV disabled and stock springs. The suspension and braking loads are far more than what you can achieve on the street.
 

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"Creating a dangerous situation" is a little over the top, IMHO.
I have triked and disabled my ADV while still using OEM fork springs.
I have not noticed any excessive nose dive.
Maybe if you would explain what happened to you to make that comment I would understand.
Thanks
 

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+3. I disabled mine with stock springs about 2 years ago. I am satisfied. Have never felt in danger. If I ever get around to changing fork oil or doing some other front end work I may upgrade the springs but, for now, I am ok with it.
 
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