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Had my first big scare since I started riding again three weeks ago. Tonight I was going for a ride around the local area. First night in about two weeks that the temp has come down to something real enjoyable - 70 degrees. I was riding some back roads around Anaheim Hills and then got on the freeway. I had only been on for about 2 mins, going about 70 when I almost hit a large piece of big-rig trucker tire tread that had detached. It was black the same shade as the pavement and I did not see it until I was on top of it. It stood up on end about 15 inches. Missed it by millimeters, my right peg scraped it. It was a whole tire length bunched up. I can only imagine what would have happened it I had hit it dead on. Took awhile to calm down. At first I just wanted to head on home but I continued riding for about another hour reminding myself why I was on the bike. Thanks for reading.
 

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Glad you missed it. I know how nerve wracking close calls can be.
 

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A special good morning to you, gary. Those " close calls " are little gifts we are given from time to time as a reminder of just how exhilarating riding a motorcycle can be.
 

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I was right behind a truck one day when his tire exploded , I missed it by 2 feet but to see it develope in front of you was scary , glad you missed it also
 

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One of the tactics m/c instructors teach about being unable to avoid an obstacle: shift your weight to the rear, hit the throttle hard and pull up on the bars. It's an old off-road technique and it does work, don't ask how I know.:eek: but it was call dunnage.
 

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Had the same experience a couple of weeks ago, big ole road gator laying in the lane! Made evasive manuvers but I clipped it enough to leave a black mark on the front wheel and down the lower cowl. Fortunately no damage, the black marks wiped off the bike easy enough...the other lower end was a different story.

Mark
 

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Ya dun good!

I live pretty close to you and I'm familiar with the area. This time of year, with the heat, on our So. Cal. freeways there's nothing but road aligators all over. The trucks the frequent the ports are in the worst conditions and the 91 is a main thoroughfare for those trucks out to the Inland Empire. Stay out of the right lanes is my only advice! Good ridin because you saw it and missed it! ;)
 

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Get some bright lights, aim them low and illuminate the road in front of you!

It sounds like you forgot one basic rule of riding: Don't ride beyond your line of sight. If you can only see 75 feet in front of you, then you should ride at a speed that allows you to stop or take an evasive maneuver in less than 75 feet! At 55 MPH you are traveling 79 feet per second. If you can't see the road in front of you for 300 feet, then you'd better be able to stop the bike or take evasive maneuvers in less than 4 seconds!

Remember to ride the line. Imagine a line of light laying on the pavement in front of you that you are following. Think of it like a ray of light, not unlike the Ghostbusters streams! It lays on the road in front of you all the time, but it "moves" (in your mind) as you ride. When you see an obstacle in front of you, it is human nature to analyze and identify it. While you are blasting along the road thinking, "What is THAT thing?" you are burning up precious distance NOT planning a route around it! When you see an obstruction, let your mind instantly plan a route around it by bending your light ray path around it and follow that path! Resist the temptation to identify the "thing." It doesn't matter what it was, as long as you don't hit it.


My sister once came down a road. She was driving about 50 MPH. She saw "a white thing" on the road in front of her. My sister is a scientist, and analyzes EVERYTHING. It is her nature. So rather than instantly check her mirrors and plan to drive around it, she continued along, aiming straight for it while she tried to determine what it was. "Is it a pillow? I can drive over a pillow! A dog? What breed of dog is white? Someone laying in the road in a fetal position wearing a white shirt?!? No... I have concluded that it is a pillow so I'll just drive over it."

BANG! She hit it dead on! Never even slowed down, because she was so focused on IDENTIFYING the thing, and was convinced it was a pillow! It took out her front bumper, her oil pan and muffler. It was a 5 gallon propane tank! Luckily it did not explode! My sister is a SCARY driver. She has a bad habit of accelerating into stopped traffic! A ride with her will put anything Disneyland has to offer into the category of a hay ride on a farm.
 

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Had my first big scare since I started riding again three weeks ago. Tonight I was going for a ride around the local area. First night in about two weeks that the temp has come down to something real enjoyable - 70 degrees. I was riding some back roads around Anaheim Hills and then got on the freeway. I had only been on for about 2 mins, going about 70 when I almost hit a large piece of big-rig trucker tire tread that had detached. It was black the same shade as the pavement and I did not see it until I was on top of it. It stood up on end about 15 inches. Missed it by millimeters, my right peg scraped it. It was a whole tire length bunched up. I can only imagine what would have happened it I had hit it dead on. Took awhile to calm down. At first I just wanted to head on home but I continued riding for about another hour reminding myself why I was on the bike. Thanks for reading.
Hi.

This may or may not apply to you...

I gave up riding for 25 years or so to launch my career, raise kids, yadda. In 2005, I took up riding again. I got my motorcycle license form DMV after passing their obstacle course, but took the MSF shortly after that.

Having taken such a long hiatus from riding, I knew had lost my 6th sense where you have a pretty good idea of what other drivers will do and you can scan an entire area lining up potential threats as you change your view of the road every second or two.

It took 6-12 mos to redevelop the beginnings of that 6th sense again. I remember for the first few months back i riding of getting tired on short rides because I had to force myself to constantly scan the roadway ahead to the side and the rear. Because it wasn't habit, it was tiring. My motto when riding is if you see it, your brain at least has a chance of avoiding it or softening the blow. Don't see it and it may getcha.

As a result of having to redevelop old skills, I had too many near-misses when out riding. As time went on, the near-misses became less intense and less frequent. Now, I find myself having to practice avoiding something or aggressive braking while riding. Doesn't mean that I'm safe now; on the contrary, I remain vigilant, but it's habit now. And when I notice that I've been sloppy - like not having noticed a pedestrian, car, dog, whatever until I'm right on top of it or past it - I chastise myself and try to learn from it.

If this is close to your situation, the more riding time will lengthen the time between near-misses and make the near-misses less near.
 

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Glad you were not injured. Now you know why a lot of riders don't like to travel after dark, especially on high speed roadways. Just no way to see that far down the road to avoid something like gators and debris in the road. Be careful out there and ride safe.
 

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Glad you missed it and hope it will not keep you from riding. I too am one of those who tries not to ride much after dark. We have a lot of deer around here. If I do I make sure to not outride my headlights.
 

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I'm one of those that gave up riding at night because of the tire trash. As hot as it is here, it is everywhere. It was worse with the trike as you gotta get three wheels around that stuff and sometimes there is a bunch of it scattered all over the road. A number of years ago I remember hitting a full tread that a semi lost in front of me when I was doing about 80 in my truck trying to get home. I went up on two wheels and almost rolled it. When I got it stopped and stopped shaking, I got out to see what the damage was. It has really dented the front scoop and messed up my front end. I was able to get on home but was about $500 in damage.

Really agree with whoever said not to out drive your lights. The times that I have made the decision to drive after dark, I really slow down enough to hopefully avoid anything like that. Every time I drive at night I remember that incident and take care. Glad you were able to avoid it. Many happy rides to you in the future.
 
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