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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Several times I have described this process to members. Finally decide to make a thread for the procedure. Trust me this works


Get a can/jar to use as discard fluid receiver, Put a few ounces of brake fluid in the can, Next get the brake bleeding hose hooked to bleeder and stick other end in said can, Open your reservoir on master cylinder and top off with clean fluid, open bleeder/keeping the open end of the hose under the fluid at all times start to pump the brake lever, As you pump it you will need to continue topping off reservoir.

You will see as you do this the air in the hose will move back and forth a bit until it starts to be forced out, eventually you will also see the nice clean fluid appear. Typically you can do this and use about a half a pint or so until you see no more bubbles. What you are doing is basically using your master cylinder as a pump.

The absolute most important thing is to not let the open hose come above the fluid.

As I said this is tried and trued used for years when I raced and never fails. We use this method at our Maintenance Day at my shop and even had one savvy mechanic Wing rider exclaimed after it was done......"That can't be all there is to it, it has to be more than that."

You can also use this method to bleed the clutch as well
 

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Now Fossil are you talking about doing this on each bleeder all the way around the bike? Isn't there a particular order they are suppose to be done in?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Now Fossil are you talking about doing this on each bleeder all the way around the bike? Isn't there a particular order they are suppose to be done in?


Yes Jim, at every bleeder.


Also there are particular orders as to which bleeder you open, but this process still remains the same. Models may be different order. I know a 1500 is different from an 1800 but again this process remains the same.


You can also use this to bleed the clutch.
 

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Several times I have described this process to members. Finally decide to make a thread for the procedure. Trust me this works


Get a can/jar to use as discard fluid receiver, Put a few ounces of brake fluid in the can, Next get the brake bleeding hose hooked to bleeder and stick other end in said can, Open your reservoir on master cylinder and top off with clean fluid, open bleeder/keeping the open end of the hose under the fluid at all times start to pump the brake lever, As you pump it you will need to continue topping off reservoir.

You will see as you do this the air in the hose will move back and forth a bit until it starts to be forced out, eventually you will also see the nice clean fluid appear. Typically you can do this and use about a half a pint or so until you see no more bubbles. What you are doing is basically using your master cylinder as a pump.

The absolute most important thing is to not let the open hose come above the fluid.

As I said this is tried and trued used for years when I raced and never fails. We use this method at our Maintenance Day at my shop and even had one savvy mechanic Wing rider exclaimed after it was done......"That can't be all there is to it, it has to be more than that."

You can also use this method to bleed the clutch as well
this is how my daddy taught me to bleed brakes back when I was a kid
 
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Perhaps someone can shed some light for me, The last wing I had was about 10 years ago so I don't remember the rear brake being soft. On My new bike I find I really have to push hard on the rear brake to get any brake action is this normal or do I maybe have some air in the rear brake system? Bike is 2017 bought new last spring.
Thanks If I need to bread the brakes I sure know a good system now.
 

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When I was prepping for this past summers trip, I bought the Speed Bleeders as well, I also hd pu tthem on the Magna when I had it. These stop the air from going back in. Just keep filling the reservoir and pump the brake handle until you see clean fluid.

I swapped out on the Magna myself, but on the wing I had Triumph Detroit do it for me. Great shop by the way, professional staff and competitive pricing. Will probably have them put the new tires on in the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Where can I find this bleeding order for a 1500?


Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk


Sorry @dwade, just saw this.


Order is as follows:


Front Left Caliper
Rear Caliper....Remember these are linked brakes which is why that's the order
Front Right Caliper
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Perhaps someone can shed some light for me, The last wing I had was about 10 years ago so I don't remember the rear brake being soft. On My new bike I find I really have to push hard on the rear brake to get any brake action is this normal or do I maybe have some air in the rear brake system? Bike is 2017 bought new last spring.
Thanks If I need to bread the brakes I sure know a good system now.


It is possible, for the 1800's there is a much more complex order of bleeding. Outlined in the attached thread link.


https://www.goldwingowners.com/forums/11-honda-goldwing-forum-general-discussion/6373-bleeding-brakes.html
 
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Sorry @dwade, just saw this.


Order is as follows:


Front Left Caliper
Rear Caliper....Remember these are linked brakes which is why that's the order
Front Right Caliper
Thank you sir! One of the things I want to do on my winter maintenance list.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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fossii92 thanks for the reply and link, If i only think I have air in the rear do I need to bleed everything or can I just bleed the back. I suspect not but thought I would ask. Bike is less than one year old it may even be warranty.
Once again thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If it's under warranty, I would get the shop to do it.

If not I would bleed every thing just because that is how I do things, but I guess you might just do the rears.

:dunno:

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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Bleeding brakes is a constant operation for me so I go through lots of brake fluid and have learned some tricks.

Speed bleeders are good however there are other ways and in general one must do the bleed alone which induces some creativity. Basically all a speed bleeder does is allow fluid to exit but does not allow backwards flow. It is a one way valve. One caution here is to wrap the bleed valve with teflon plumbers tape otherwise air will be sucked past the threads and ruin the efforts.

The front brakes are not to bad but rear can be a challenge so here is what I use rather than the speed bleeders. I have a bunch of these on hand so it's a no brainer to use as a one way valve. Just go to eBay and search - Disc Brake 2 Pound Residual Valve

Now just add a short brake line to this valve and let it do its job of allowing fluid to go only out and not back in. It makes this job 100% effective and easy peasy.
Works on all brakes and great for doing cars or trucks so you don't need 4 hands to open and close bleeder valves. On new systems where the fluid come out clean you can even redirect the fluid from the valve back into the master reservoir and just pump away until the fluid is completely void of bubbles.

Side note - never tighten the screws on the reservoir more than finger tight or you will need a drill or impact screwdriver to open it next time - I impact a lot of these "good and tight" screws. :)

 

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Is it normal for the clutch to not engage after the winter season? Bike was under a shelter. Any input is appreciated.
 

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I now have a trike (Roadsmith) how much of a difference will this make?? As you may know that I am an Changeohlic when it comes to oil/filter and rad fluid, BUT I have not replaced brake or clutch fluids on my 2010 trike..........This is good info. Thank you

Ronnie
 
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