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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today I installed a 175/60 R-16 Dunlop SP Wintersport Run Flat c/t on my 1995 Aspencade. I purchased it from Tire Rack for 130.00 + 24.87 shipping for a total of 154.87. It was ordered on a weekend and arrived within 3 days.

This morning I rode an extra 30 miles to an independent motorcycle shop whom I bought a Maxi Scooter from last year and assumed they would have no problem installing a c/t. When I arrived I asked them if they would install and they said no because it was dangerous to run a c/t on a motorcycle and looked at me like I was stupid. They didn't realize that they had just lost my business for life as I called another independent figuring the dealers probably wouldn't do it. That shop said they would but they charge more to install a c/t as it's more work. I don't know why it's more work but I asked them how much and they said $100. Funny, I had called them a few months ago when I was calling around about installing a Shinko m/t on my 1200 and back then they quoted me $100 to install the Stinko. Go figure. So, I ran it by and within an hour the tire was installed for a total of $112.00 including a new metal valve and tax.

Here are my initial ride impressions. Immediately I noticed how much quieter the bike was, just like Lee said it would be. Previously, I thought all that road noise was coming from the front but really it's from the rear tire. Around town it felt no different than my Dunlop Elite m/t tire. I used the bike in town allot today, pulling in and out of parking lots and driveways, leaning the bike sharply on left and right tight turns and it felt solid and planted. I live 30 miles from town in the country as I was able to open it up on the way home and recorded 3500 rpm at 75mph indicated. I took it up to 100mph indicated and the bike ran straight and solid as if I could run a long distance at that speed comfortably. I have a couple of sweepers that I generally like to really lean strong and countersteer into as I wasn't timid about leaning the bike radically and it felt comfortable and smooth all the way through the lean. There was no instability whatsoever in the bike with a radical lean as it held the lean all the way through without wanting to come back up. My last test of the tire was my off road, road from hell to my cabin in the woods. Entering the dirt road from the asphalt takes one down a long hill that is long overdue on re-grading as it is a mix of patches of asphalt from my neighbors paving company, iron ore rock, gravel and sand. To say the least it is not for the faint of heart to ride or drive on. After 15 years I've gotten used to it. However when it rains all the silt settles at the bottom of the hill and therefore becomes sand, deep sand. This has always been my nemesis and commands my total focus when I ride the 100 ft. thru it with my legs out like outriggers as the bike idles thru in low gear. It wouldn't be so bad if it was straight, but no, it's in a curve. So when I rode down the hill I followed the right track down as I usually do however that's also the track that I've previously ridden thru and therefore has deep furrows which is hard to control the front tire. As I entered the right track the bike felt pretty squirrely as it usually does and it was a handful to get through as usual. I decided to turn around at the house and make another pass and this time to come up to the deep furrow and stop the bike and re-start again. I did this 4 or 5 times and each time the rear tire didn't bog down and act like it was getting stuck like it did with my m/t. I turned around at the top of the hill and this time decided to follow left track in the road which I hadn't ridden in and therefore the sand, though deep had no furrows in the curve that would pull my tire uncontrollably. I was able to duck waddle my feet while the bike moved through the entire curve without stopping or loss of control. So, my theory was right, the c/t is more stable in sand. As for furrows, probably the only thing that can move through them with ease is a motocross tire.

When I got back to the house I tried to get the bike up on the center stand and almost did it with rocking the bike with repeated attempts but became resigned to the fact it wasn't going to happen. I grabbed a small piece of 3/4" plywood and rode the back tire up on it and the center stand worked like a charm. I keep my bike stored in a Bike Barn and always park it on the center stand as it's simple to keep the plywood on the ground where I park it each night to operate the center stand. I suppose if one wants to use the center stand while away from home, they could carry a short piece of 1x6 in their trunk to park the back tire on. Personally, I only use the center stand at home because the Bike Barn is rather spartan in size and the bike centers up nicely inside on the center stand. I took a tire pressure reading and the motorcycle shop had filled it the max at 51 pounds and I let out 10 to bring it down to 41psi. I'll try this for awhile and see how it works and compare to others who run the same tire.







 

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At first I thought, " $100 to change a tire ???? ". I had mine mounted for $16. Then I remembered I took my wheel off and walked into the Goodyear store with an old tire and rim in one hand and the C/T and a pack of Dyna-beads and metal valve stem in the other hand. The final cost for my tire, etc. came to about $230. So figure for about $30 more you had the whole shebang done.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
At first I thought, " $100 to change a tire ???? ". I had mine mounted for $16. Then I remembered I took my wheel off and walked into the Goodyear store with an old tire and rim in one hand and the C/T and a pack of Dyna-beads and metal valve stem in the other hand. The final cost for my tire, etc. came to about $230. So figure for about $30 more you had the whole shebang done.
Lee, I dated a girl once named Shebang and she didn't cost that much.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
You got a group discount ?
Lee, what do you call 2 rather rotund Shebangs sitting in a bar together? A pickup truck.

BTW, I noticed you guys have certified darkside numbers. Whose keeping count and where do you sign-up?
 

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Lee, what do you call 2 rather rotund Shebangs sitting in a bar together? A pickup truck.

BTW, I noticed you guys have certified darkside numbers. Whose keeping count and where do you sign-up?
Those numbers are issued from the GL1800 Darkside Forum.
 

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At first I thought, " $100 to change a tire ???? ". I had mine mounted for $16. Then I remembered I took my wheel off and walked into the Goodyear store with an old tire and rim in one hand and the C/T and a pack of Dyna-beads and metal valve stem in the other hand. The final cost for my tire, etc. came to about $230. So figure for about $30 more you had the whole shebang done.
Lee,

The 1800 has lug nuts and you can remove the rim from one side. The 1500 requires more labor. I think $100 is a fair price to have the rim removed from the bike, tire installed and reinstalled back on the bike.
 

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Dan,

Now just enjoy the tire for the next 25,000 miles. It was cheaper to buy and will last twice as long. Oh well. Welcome to the dark side.

Did you put a tire on the front?

I enjoy riding my bike with the car tire on the back. As quiet as it is, I feel like I am riding an electric bike. I have another 14,000 miles to go, then I will put one of the Wintersport Run Flat on mine as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Did you put a tire on the front?
Tire is on back order. Originally checked Motorcycle Superstore regarding the Shinko Journey 890 and they were out of stock and back ordered. Checked Motorcycle Mania and they appeared to be in stock do I ordered and several days later they call me and say they're back ordered too. So I figure everyone was probably sitting on empty so I'm waiting for a 4/1 expected arrival to the vendor and subsequent shipment.

Getting close to the end Larry on the restoration of Joel's bike. He'd be proud to see her now in tip top shape. My last big ticket item will be the timing belts. Got a quote from a Honda dealer and an independent of 210 for labor + cost of belts. The Honda dealer will most likely want to use OEM belts at 70 bucks a piece whereas I can probably get the Gates belts from the auto store for 35 each and provide my own belts to the independent shop for installation.

Of course when I said I was near the end of the restoration of my Wing that was only regarding the more functional repairs needed to get it roadworthy. Then there's highway pegs, Baker Wind Wings, new grips etc. Nearly everyday I ride this bike I get compliments about it.
 

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Thanks for the report....Glad it worked out. Can't wait to get one myself
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks Phil, Larry and Lee for your comments. I was reading on Saunders forum of a rider who recently went darkside and he spoke of how his c/t wants to stand up a little more quickly than his m/t when coming out of a turn. He wasn't running the Dunlop and don't recall which one he runs. I didn't feel the standing up issue which allegedly would be from the lack of a rounded side wall. How about you Larry, do you sense your tire wanting to stand up coming out of a turn other than the normal effect of acceleration exiting the turn?

Re-checked Saunders site. The tire is a Falken Ziex 912 on an 1800.
 

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Tire is on back order. Originally checked Motorcycle Superstore regarding the Shinko Journey 890 and they were out of stock and back ordered. Checked Motorcycle Mania and they appeared to be in stock do I ordered and several days later they call me and say they're back ordered too. So I figure everyone was probably sitting on empty so I'm waiting for a 4/1 expected arrival to the vendor and subsequent shipment.

Getting close to the end Larry on the restoration of Joel's bike. He'd be proud to see her now in tip top shape. My last big ticket item will be the timing belts. Got a quote from a Honda dealer and an independent of 210 for labor + cost of belts. The Honda dealer will most likely want to use OEM belts at 70 bucks a piece whereas I can probably get the Gates belts from the auto store for 35 each and provide my own belts to the independent shop for installation.

Of course when I said I was near the end of the restoration of my Wing that was only regarding the more functional repairs needed to get it roadworthy. Then there's highway pegs, Baker Wind Wings, new grips etc. Nearly everyday I ride this bike I get compliments about it.
There is a great "How to" on doing the belts on the Steve Saunders site. Mine now have 25,000 miles on them and 6 years so I will be doing the same thing next winter, along with a new rear tire.

Your bike only has 25,000 miles. He almost always parked his bike in the garage and most of it's life has been in New Mexico. Low humidity and mild temperatures. I wouldn't be too concerned right away on the belts. They are older but they will still be in great shape when you pull the cover off.... which you could do yourself just to check the visual condition of them. I have been warned to not use that as a judgement to decide to replace or not, but at least you could see them and make a judgement on their condition. $350 could be spent elsewhere, but if it gives you good piece of mind, then it might be worth it.

I am going to attend a maintenance workshop put on some GWRRA members in April. Ron Robertson, in Bellingham from our forum here will host it. He has owned his '93 since it was new and now has 185,000 miles on it. He should know a few tricks. I suspect I will meet someone there who has done it and might volunteer to coach me through the process. At the workshop in April, I plan to change the air filter and any other filter on the bike. I guess there is a transmission breather as well? Not sure about that one. Check on the hoses and electrical connections.... that kind of thing. Ask questions of the guys who have owned them for quite awhile. That is one of the great advantages of belonging to the GWRRA.

By the way, Joel paid for my subscription to the GWRRA for another year as a gift to me for referring you to him. That was very kind. I had just paid my dues, so I am paid up for the next two full years.

It was exciting for me to watch the thing develop between you and Joel. To watch your enthusiasm for upgrading to a 1500 and Joel's desire to sell the bike. I just wish I had paid more attention to what it was going to need. The brake problem was something I had no idea was going on with the bike. I really am glad it worked out and you are enjoying that bike. Someone needed to get that back on the road and why not someone who will take good care of it like yourself.

Hopefully your wife will take to the wing ride and will accompany you on many adventures.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
There is a great "How to" on doing the belts on the Steve Saunders site. Mine now have 25,000 miles on them and 6 years so I will be doing the same thing next winter, along with a new rear tire.

Your bike only has 25,000 miles. He almost always parked his bike in the garage and most of it's life has been in New Mexico. Low humidity and mild temperatures. I wouldn't be too concerned right away on the belts. They are older but they will still be in great shape when you pull the cover off.... which you could do yourself just to check the visual condition of them. I have been warned to not use that as a judgement to decide to replace or not, but at least you could see them and make a judgement on their condition. $350 could be spent elsewhere, but if it gives you good piece of mind, then it might be worth it.

I am going to attend a maintenance workshop put on some GWRRA members in April. Ron Robertson, in Bellingham from our forum here will host it. He has owned his '93 since it was new and now has 185,000 miles on it. He should know a few tricks. I suspect I will meet someone there who has done it and might volunteer to coach me through the process. At the workshop in April, I plan to change the air filter and any other filter on the bike. I guess there is a transmission breather as well? Not sure about that one. Check on the hoses and electrical connections.... that kind of thing. Ask questions of the guys who have owned them for quite awhile. That is one of the great advantages of belonging to the GWRRA.

By the way, Joel paid for my subscription to the GWRRA for another year as a gift to me for referring you to him. That was very kind. I had just paid my dues, so I am paid up for the next two full years.

It was exciting for me to watch the thing develop between you and Joel. To watch your enthusiasm for upgrading to a 1500 and Joel's desire to sell the bike. I just wish I had paid more attention to what it was going to need. The brake problem was something I had no idea was going on with the bike. I really am glad it worked out and you are enjoying that bike. Someone needed to get that back on the road and why not someone who will take good care of it like yourself.

Hopefully your wife will take to the wing ride and will accompany you on many adventures.
Thanks for the belt tip Larry however i'm a hell of a carpenter but mechanics; I'd rather pay someone else so I don't screw it up. $350.00 for peace of mind is money well spent to me.

As for the brake issue, Joel told me about it on the front end as he was candid about everything. I've never had second thoughts about this bike. I'm really just a poor boy and always dreamed of owning a Wing but never thought I could afford one. Thanks to you good friend that this is a dream come true for me. I couldn't be happier. I'm going to get Deb on the bike as soon as the front tire gets replaced. My precious cargo deserves the highest safety net I can give her.
 

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I am ordering my tire, the Dunlop Wintersport SP Run Flat 175/60R-16. The shipping for my tire to Seattle was $19.50. So complete, my tire costs $149.50.

Dan,

Thanks for clearing the path for me on this tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am ordering my tire, the Dunlop Wintersport SP Run Flat 175/60R-16. The shipping for my tire to Seattle was $19.50. So complete, my tire costs $149.50.

Dan,

Thanks for clearing the path for me on this tire.
Good news Larry. My tire arrived in 3 days. If you get a TPMS let me know what you've found. Haven't pulled the plug yet as we've been saving our coins for our NW trip in July.
 

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Ordered my tire today

I ordered my 175/60 R-16 Dunlop Wintersport Run Flat. I expect to receive this tire on 6/6/2012.

The total costs with shipping was $149.51.

Note: Tire Rack had this tire as a CLOSE OUT.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I ordered my 175/60 R-16 Dunlop Wintersport Run Flat. I expect to receive this tire on 6/6/2012.

The total costs with shipping was $149.51.

Note: Tire Rack had this tire as a CLOSE OUT.
Good price Larry, you will love it.
 

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I have the Alpine on my 1800 with 3K on it as of this weekend and I hope to never have to go back to the mc again. I just fell my safety is so better with the ct and if I can get 20K out of it thats just more $$$ in my pocket.
 
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