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I've been reading in my Clymer's manual about the importance of using plenty of Dielectric grease when doing electrical work on the Goldwings.

I just finished re-installing the fuel pump and was wondering if it is possible to use too much of the Dielectric grease when re-connecting the electrical connectors on the bike.

In other words, is it imperative that you be careful that you do not bridge the metal connectors with this grease in order to avoid shorting out the system? Isn't the grease itself a conductor of electrical current?

Some of the connectors on the bike have multiple connector pins; and if this grease is a conductor; I would think if one was to just slop a bunch of this grease into the connector you would end up shorting out all kinds of components.

Maybe I'm not understanding how the Dielectric grease works.

Thanks for your wisdom regarding this question.

Harkgold.
 

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No need to worry. It is non-conductive, but when you slide the connectors together there is metal-to-metal contact and the grease gets displaced but the area around connector is protected from moisture. It is the best stuff to use to keep corrosion at bay.
 

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+1 the only thing too much gets you is a mess.
 

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According to one veteran rider : " I just had another one yesterday. A bike with a CB error problem, and the problem was caused by a CB connector that was loaded with dielectric grease. I had to spray out and scrub all his audio related connectors.

It is a ritual for many people to load up every connector within reach with dielectric grease every time they service their bike, just as a matter of GP. Dielectric grease is good stuff, if used properly, and if used in the proper instances. But if you use it in the wrong places, you will cause more problems than you cure. I suspect this is why many people are cursed with numerous electrical problem.

Do not use dielectric grease in switches, and only use it in heavy connectors that carry nothing but high current.

There is a phenomenon in electronics wherein a low voltage has a tougher time breaking through an insulating layer than a higher voltage one until current begins to flow. To equate it to something familiar, it is much like an HID lamp, which needs a high voltage kick to bridge the air gap in the lamp, and once current begins to flow, the voltage can be reduced.

Added to this problem is that connectors that carry low current signals have much lighter contacts that flex easily, and are easily separated by a layer of thick grease. This can completely open the connection and prevent any current from flowing.

Dielectric grease is fine for things like lamp sockets that have 12 volts on them, with connectors that place high pressure on the contacts that can squeeze the grease out of the way.

But putting grease in a light duty connector that carries data and switching signals, and especially ones that carry low level audio signals is just inviting problems down the road. It's ok to spray a light layer of silicone, WD40, or contact cleaner on your contacts, but that's about it.

Just some friendly advice from someone who spends a lot of time fixing these problems. I'm not trying to create a firestorm. If you believe differently, carry on ". ~
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Larry
2002 Illusion Blue GL1800
 

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Sorry to differ but, a small amount is all that is needed. To much is not a good thing. All is not displaced as there is never 100% contact along the entire length of pins into sockets
 

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According to one veteran rider : " I just had another one yesterday. A bike with a CB error problem, and the problem was caused by a CB connector that was loaded with dielectric grease. I had to spray out and scrub all his audio related connectors.

It is a ritual for many people to load up every connector within reach with dielectric grease every time they service their bike, just as a matter of GP. Dielectric grease is good stuff, if used properly, and if used in the proper instances. But if you use it in the wrong places, you will cause more problems than you cure. I suspect this is why many people are cursed with numerous electrical problem.

Do not use dielectric grease in switches, and only use it in heavy connectors that carry nothing but high current.

There is a phenomenon in electronics wherein a low voltage has a tougher time breaking through an insulating layer than a higher voltage one until current begins to flow. To equate it to something familiar, it is much like an HID lamp, which needs a high voltage kick to bridge the air gap in the lamp, and once current begins to flow, the voltage can be reduced.

Added to this problem is that connectors that carry low current signals have much lighter contacts that flex easily, and are easily separated by a layer of thick grease. This can completely open the connection and prevent any current from flowing.

Dielectric grease is fine for things like lamp sockets that have 12 volts on them, with connectors that place high pressure on the contacts that can squeeze the grease out of the way.

But putting grease in a light duty connector that carries data and switching signals, and especially ones that carry low level audio signals is just inviting problems down the road. It's ok to spray a light layer of silicone, WD40, or contact cleaner on your contacts, but that's about it.

Just some friendly advice from someone who spends a lot of time fixing these problems. I'm not trying to create a firestorm. If you believe differently, carry on ". ~
__________________
Larry
2002 Illusion Blue GL1800
I totally agree with this. Too much is almost as bad even for the heavy-duty connectors that carry the heavy current. Low current connectors are too prone to being insulated by the grease.
Steve F
 
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