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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 94 Goldwing Interstate with 34,000 miles.

I put on a car tire: Federal FORMOZA FD2 175/60 R16 82H, and it lowered the bike 3/4 of an inch. I can stand flat footed on both sides of the bike now.

The radial tire in the back has not killed the bias ply tire in the front, yet! 3000 miles and they seem to be getting along ok.

I am getting 35 mpg pulling my 2 wheel trailer full of camping gear. The extra rpm due to the smaller tire does not seem to bother me too much. At 4,000 rpm, I am going 95 and I didn't check the tach at 105 but that is as faster as I need to go. I did get a little wobble around the 95 mark, but it disappeared at 100 or there abouts. (without the trailer behind me on a road posted 80 mph)

38 for air pressure front and back seems to work good for me.

I don't even think about that rear tire being a car tire anymore.

I will be putting another 1300 miles coming home from Las Vegas in the next few days...... if anything changes, I will repost.





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it would be great if you could keep updating this
 

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I heard that mumble... LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I now have about 4500 miles on the tire. No worries for me. I settled on 38 for air pressure. The bike pulled my trailer from Seattle to Phoenix and back without any problems what so ever. My concerns shifted to other things on the bike...... as I am now no longer concerned about the CT whatsoever.

Going south on 95 out of Henderson, NV the speed limit on that stretch of road is 80.... I noticed a slight front end wobble at 95 that went away at 100. I couldn't tell if that was the rear radial tire attacking the front bias ply tire, or what it was. I was more concerned about the eyes in the sky at that moment than the performance of my tires.

I don't even give the tire a second thought when I go into a sweeper or a curve, as the bike just goes where I want it to.

The only thing I can say that I have noticed is that the tire does "follow along" when in a track or a seam on a roadway and when you make an effort to pull off of that.... it does have a little movement on the rear end. It does this so rarely that I have difficulty explaining what occurs but I do notice a change.

I continue to read about the dark side experiences though.... as if I am still not completely over the buyer's remorse that goes with making a decision such as this. I mean when it is all said and done, what I have done is changed from a very proven tire (E-3) to a controversial solution based on saving some money.

Hopefully I will get another 20,000 miles out of this tire before I have to change it out, then would I do it again? We will see. I might be looking for an 1800 by then.

My tire on my Volusia is showing its age and is due for replacement this year and I am researching a car tire for it.
 

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The rear rim weas notmade for a car tire. And mixing a radial and a bias belted tire is asking for trouble. If you ever have a mishap, hope your insurance adjuster isn't smart enough to know what you did. Running a radial on a non radial rim and mixing the two tire types.
Mickey Thompson Racing Tires displays this warning on ALL their bias ply tires.
quote:WARNING: Mickey Thompson Indy Profile S/S tires are Bias Ply. It is not recommended that radial and non-radial tires be mixed on the same vehicle.

FROM: Dunflop http://dunlop.buffnet.net/cycle/tcm.html
quote:Mixing radials with bias or belted bias tires may adversely affect handling and stability. Never fit a radial front with a non-radial tire. Always fit Sportmax, Sportmax II D204 and Sportmax Touring D205 High Performance Radials in pairs.

FROM: Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine an article all about tires that really explains the differences in construction. Click the link and read the page and your questions are likely to be answered.
http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/tech/tire_facts/index.html
quote:8. Don't Mix and Match: Never run two tires of differing construction. We can't stress this enough, and this rule applies to bias-plies vs. radials as well as tubeless and tube-type tires--even bias-ply vs. bias-belted tires. The results can be disastrous.

FROM: A Yamaha FJ site at http://www.btinternet.com/~fj1200mods/Rims_Tires.htm
quote:
Bias-Ply, Belted Bias & Radial
The early 16 inch rims were designed to be fitted with bias-ply tires. There are still a wide variety of these made to fit the FJ. If you are interested in sticking with original equipment then many choices remain. Most folks opt to put radial tires on these rims. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Myself and countless others have made this choice for years. Radial tires are very stiff across the tread patch, due to a rigid center belt, yet, they still flex in the side wall area which gives a more comfortable ride. Here are some related quotes:
"A pure radial tire is useless because it's too flexible to steer. This problem is solved by wrapping the simple radial carcass with a circumferential, or near-circumferential reinforcing belt, or belts, under the tread area only. This leaves the radial-ply sidewalls very flexible....."
"Simply put, a radial tire combines a tread region of great lateral stiffness, with very flexible sidewalls. The virtues of of radial construction are these (1) Cooler running.....,(2) More grip....., (3) Reduced tread wear.

"All the forces of braking, cornering, and acceleration have to pass through two elliptical areas (the tire footprints) formed as the tires flatten against the road."

"As noted elsewhere, motorcycle stability gets most of it's damping from the tire footprints. With radial (tire) construction, the foot-prints become larger and longer, tending to increase stability,"

"Sportbike Performance Handbook", Kevin Cameron, 1998

A few other purists use belted bias tires. They are sort of a cross between radials a bias-ply using the same basic core design as a bias-ply tire with the reinforcing center belt of the radial. They offer the greatest over all stiffness of any tire design.

There is a temptation, for some, to mix bias-ply and radial tires on either ends of their motorcycles even though the majority of riders advise against it. Some governments that have legislated against this action. In the UK it is illegal to use a bias-ply tire in the rear and a radial tire up front. Tire manufacturers advise against this as well. I have no real experience with this though, I am inclined to believe that mixing any combination of these three tire types on any motorcycle, especially one as powerful as the FJ, is asking for trouble. In support I offer a dialog written by my friend, Bob Voll:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
ct

I did notice blood in the back of the pickup when I hauled both the bias ply and the radial to the installer. I was suspect that one of these tires attacked the other when I wasn't looking. I assumed that since they were separated by a motorcycle frame and have different tours of duty that they would eventually get to know each other and stop acting so independently of each other.

Oh well. I have 4,500 miles on this combination now and I hope to put another 10,000 on them together before I have to strip off the front tire and replace it. Then I hope to put another 10,000 on my ct before I replace it.

If anyone wants to try riding my bike and you are halfway good at keeping two tires from fighting each other, then you are welcome to try my bike out for yourself.

Again, I am not trying to get anyone else to do this. It is a choice I made after witnessing many others trying it.

I am thankful for others concerns, I really am.
 

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Everyone has to make their own decisions, I have over 300,000 miles on Gold Wings, I have been in every state except Alaska, Hawaii and North Dakota. I have probably dragged more foot pegs and body work than a lot of others and all I can say is good luck and I hope you ride solo. I like sportier riding so I sold my Wing and got a bike that can do some sport riding.
Here is another story about someone that thought going 100 MPH was a good idea.
http://puyallup.komonews.com/news/transportation/man-killed-high-speed-motorcycle-crash-river-road/633784

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Everyone has to make their own decisions, I have over 300,000 miles on Gold Wings, I have been in every state except Alaska, Hawaii and North Dakota. I have probably dragged more foot pegs and body work than a lot of others and all I can say is good luck and I hope you ride solo. I like sportier riding so I sold my Wing and got a bike that can do some sport riding.
Here is another story about someone that thought going 100 MPH was a good idea.
http://puyallup.komonews.com/news/transportation/man-killed-high-speed-motorcycle-crash-river-road/633784

I respect your experience. I am here to share my experience and to learn from others experience.

Your example / warning is not the same thing. I have ridden that River Road several times. It is a suburban street with 40 mph speed limit and approaches from businesses on one side of the street with a river on the other. Highway 95 out of Henderson has a speed limit of 80 mph and most vehicle traffic was going 85 or faster. That was my first experience of taking this bike that fast.

I am usually the guy riding slow enough to read mail boxes.

I ride with a buddy who has a Concours. I admire his bike. If I didn't already have three to cover my different riding styles, I would probably have one.... I think the Goldwing is a pretty good choice for touring.

Also, I ride with my girl friend some of the time. I ride safe.

This thread was on a CT on a Goldwing...... if I remember right.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Over 5500 miles on that rear CT. So far, I have given up any worries about the tire. So far so good. I think if I wear out this tire, I will replace it with the same tire.

I am going to look into adding a tire pressure monitoring system just to feel a little bit safer on the bike.
 

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Design & Engineering

Over 5500 miles on that rear CT. So far, I have given up any worries about the tire. So far so good. I think if I wear out this tire, I will replace it with the same tire.

I am going to look into adding a tire pressure monitoring system just to feel a little bit safer on the bike.
And you say you're not worried... ;)

[... just couldn't resist going through the open door!]

Say, if a CT works for the rear, why don't you match it with a CT on the front? Then you wouldn't have to worry about them fighting...
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
And you say you're not worried... ;)

[... just couldn't resist going through the open door!]



Say, if a CT works for the rear, why don't you match it with a CT on the front? Then you wouldn't have to worry about them fighting...
Thanks for your comment and opinion. We can't have a discussion without having comments posted, can we?

An air pressure sensor system is a good idea on any motorcycle with any type of tire. How much of an advantage would it be if you developed a slow leak on your tire as you were driving down the road at 70 mph? It would be nice to see that huh? Might just pull over before you find out you don't have any air in the tire. Do you check the air pressure of your tires every time you start your bike? One should..... I don't. Once a week works for me....but if I had an air pressure sensor system, I could just see the pressure immediately on start up.

I just followed the practice of many many Wing owners who have gone to the dark side. Some of those folks do in fact run a rear tire on the front of their motorcycle to get the additional mileage from doing that. I will probably put a rear motorcycle tire on the front of my bike when the Dunlop 404 wears out in another 5,000 miles or so.
 

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Interesting to say the least Larry. Can't say for certain but I think Joe's post was alluding to the differences that come up with different riding styles and equipment changing characteristics of a bike's behavior. As for the guy that bit it on the Gixxer there isn't enough info to pass judgement other than there was some definite law-breaking involved. Not saying it is the case here, but all too often it's a squid on too powerfull a bike with too little knowledge and experience and got in over his head and couldn't avoid the disasterous end.
Keep us posted on your findings with the c/t though; I wouldn't do it, but info is info to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The no nos were radial on the front with a bias ply on the rear. My setup is a bias ply on the front with the radial rear car tire. Many, many Wingers have used this exact system in front of me. I am just following what others have done successfully for 100K miles without problems.

No worries. No problems. My gps summary reports shows that my high speed was 92 mph today. I guess I hit it pretty hard when passing, cuz I was cruising at 70 - 75.

43 mpg.

I have about 5 or 6000 miles before I have to replace the front tire... a Dunlop 404. I will probably go with a rear motorcycle tire on the front with the arrow in reverse tire direction.
 

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How many miles on the COnnie , Joe?
any issues|?
 

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Have gone over to darkside myself. Can not tell any difference except it feels like more braking power on rear, assume due to more rubber on ground. Getting better milage and not near as worried about rain. Besides I like all the questions about "how did you get such a FAT tire under their?"
 

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Have gone over to darkside myself. Can not tell any difference except it feels like more braking power on rear, assume due to more rubber on ground. Getting better milage and not near as worried about rain. Besides I like all the questions about "how did you get such a FAT tire under their?"
Did you mention that the tire was half the price of a motorcycle tire and it would last twice as long?
 
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