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Discussion Starter #1
I just posted an intro and mentioned the GL1100 I just bought had been sitting for about 2 1/2 years with the spark plugs removed. Does the engine block have any kind of steel or cast iron sleeves, either pressed in or cast in place, that would have rusted? I'm a Gold Wing newbie and wonder what condition the cylinder bores might be in, other than a few dead bugs and spider webs:) I haven't had time to try to look into the cylinders through the spark plug hoes, and probably won't be able to see much anyway without some sort of lighted probe/scope. I plan to use some Marvel Mystery Oil to soak the cylinders before trying to crank it anyway. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks, in advance.

Lynn
 

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yes it does have a liner
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I expected that they did. I'll see what condition they're in and probably look for a different engine rather than go the rebuild route if they're pitted. I appreciate the response.

Lynn
 

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Lake,
Don't fret the pitting just yet! I am currently employed as anengine builder/machinest. Granted, you would rather not have "pits" but they are not the real problem. It is high spots that are the problem. guess what, the rings will knock down the high spots. Before my GW I had a 750 that had not been run in over 10 years. The plugs were in, but the cylinder bores were HEAVILY pitted. (will explain later how I know that). When I first got the bike running, it smoked quite a bit, and used a lot of oil. For the first 5000 miles or so, I had to check the oil every couple of days. Then it gradually got better and better. Finally, it got to the point that it burned almost no oil at all.
How do I know that the cylinders were HEAVILY pitted??? I pulled the motor out and appart to fix the trans, and figured I would re-ring the motor, and do all new gaskets, and while I was at it I would coat the pistons, the bearings, the oil pump, etc. When I looked at the cylinders, I saw the heavy pitting. I honed about .0007 out and the cylinders were still pitted pretty well. I didn't run a profilometer on it to see how deep they were, but they were DEEP. Yet still, the motor used very little oil.
So unless there is some other problem, I would say run your GW, keep an eye on the oil, change it often, and hope for the best. If it runs well, it may stop using oil and you could save yourself a lot of trouble. If, on the other hand, you DO need to change motors, I would buy a used motor and rebuild it. When you do, you can get thermal barrier coatings on the piston decks, and heads, anti friction coatings on the skirts, trans gears, oil pump, cam and followers, oil shedding on the rods and crank and maybe parts of the crank case, etc, and you would have the absolute best engine you could ever imagine!
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's interesting and encouraging information! I was planning to pull the heads to see the condition of the cylinders before I ground any of the rust that's bound to be present into the area around the piston above the "top" (outer side?:)) compression ring. At this point I have made no effort to even determine if the engine will turn over. Whether I pull the heads or not, I had planned to first try turning the engine over by clicking the transmission into gear and trying to rotate the rear wheel, rather than using the starter and maybe risk really tearing some stuff up.
Your additional input would be greatly appreciated!
Lynn
 

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I think there is a bolt of the front of the motor, unbder the timing cover. This is the crankshaft. That would be a good place to try to turn the motor over. Needless to say, if it is rusted enough to keep it from turning over, you have some serious work ahead of you. If it will turn over, then you have a real good shot at being OK.
If the motor is rusted and won't turn, you DO NOT want to "Grind" away any rust. You are better off destroying the pistons to get it apart than you are to clean off the rust to get it apart. The pistons would not be reusable anyway, and if you don't touch the bores, then the bores will be able to clean up at the minimum amount possible. If you grind, you could well put digs in that make a saveable bore un-saveable. I have seen that many times. Usually a guy will use a ridge reamer and take a block that would have cleaned up at .020 or .030 and make it a .060 block that is still not quite clean! Slow and easy is the best advise. It is a lot harder to get into trouble because you took too much time, and were too careful!
Feel free to contact me any time. Sometimes it may take a couple emails to me, I get busy and "think" I am up to date, when I am not!
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, it has been some time since I last posted about my possibly rusted up engine. I had put some Marvel Mystery Oil into all of the cylinders about the time of my last posts. Just a couple days ago I gave it another dose of the MMO, clicked the transmission up to 5th and tried to turn the rear wheel. The first attempt yielded about 4" of rotation at the tread of the tire before it met significant resistance. A day later it increased to about 6" and this evening the wheel finally rotated a complete revolution! I didn't use any huge force, just rocked it back and forth a few times each time I worked it until it seemed to finally go past a last tight spot and kept going. There are still some spots tighter than others, which doesn't surprise me. Unless the clutch is toast, and just giving the impression that the engine is turning, I think the engine may be save-able. I'll get a helper to watch down the plug holes to see any signs of the pistons and/or valves moving to be sure. In the meantime I'm going to keep soaking with the MMO to help free up the junk that's in the cylinders. I'll probably need to drop the exhaust to get the oil and maybe some of the junk that may pump through out of the engine. I'm not going to rush into trying to fire it up just yet.
So...Tom, thanks for the encouragement to try getting it loosened up without getting carried away. When I do try firing it up what would be your opinion of using some "top oil" in the gas, like that used in methanol alky race engines, to help lube the valve stems and cylinders a bit? This may make me sound like an idiot but I ran a few tanks of "mild" pre-mix gas in a couple of seemingly DOA lawn mower engines, and got some extra life out of them.
Thanks for the help!
Lynn
 
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