Honda Goldwing Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just posted an intro and mentioned the GL1100 I just bought had been sitting for about 2 1/2 years with the spark plugs removed. Does the engine block have any kind of steel or cast iron sleeves, either pressed in or cast in place, that would have rusted? I'm a Gold Wing newbie and wonder what condition the cylinder bores might be in, other than a few dead bugs and spider webs:) I haven't had time to try to look into the cylinders through the spark plug hoes, and probably won't be able to see much anyway without some sort of lighted probe/scope. I plan to use some Marvel Mystery Oil to soak the cylinders before trying to crank it anyway. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks, in advance.

Lynn
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,121 Posts
yes it does have a liner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Lake,
Don't fret the pitting just yet! I am currently employed as anengine builder/machinest. Granted, you would rather not have "pits" but they are not the real problem. It is high spots that are the problem. guess what, the rings will knock down the high spots. Before my GW I had a 750 that had not been run in over 10 years. The plugs were in, but the cylinder bores were HEAVILY pitted. (will explain later how I know that). When I first got the bike running, it smoked quite a bit, and used a lot of oil. For the first 5000 miles or so, I had to check the oil every couple of days. Then it gradually got better and better. Finally, it got to the point that it burned almost no oil at all.
How do I know that the cylinders were HEAVILY pitted??? I pulled the motor out and appart to fix the trans, and figured I would re-ring the motor, and do all new gaskets, and while I was at it I would coat the pistons, the bearings, the oil pump, etc. When I looked at the cylinders, I saw the heavy pitting. I honed about .0007 out and the cylinders were still pitted pretty well. I didn't run a profilometer on it to see how deep they were, but they were DEEP. Yet still, the motor used very little oil.
So unless there is some other problem, I would say run your GW, keep an eye on the oil, change it often, and hope for the best. If it runs well, it may stop using oil and you could save yourself a lot of trouble. If, on the other hand, you DO need to change motors, I would buy a used motor and rebuild it. When you do, you can get thermal barrier coatings on the piston decks, and heads, anti friction coatings on the skirts, trans gears, oil pump, cam and followers, oil shedding on the rods and crank and maybe parts of the crank case, etc, and you would have the absolute best engine you could ever imagine!
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I think there is a bolt of the front of the motor, unbder the timing cover. This is the crankshaft. That would be a good place to try to turn the motor over. Needless to say, if it is rusted enough to keep it from turning over, you have some serious work ahead of you. If it will turn over, then you have a real good shot at being OK.
If the motor is rusted and won't turn, you DO NOT want to "Grind" away any rust. You are better off destroying the pistons to get it apart than you are to clean off the rust to get it apart. The pistons would not be reusable anyway, and if you don't touch the bores, then the bores will be able to clean up at the minimum amount possible. If you grind, you could well put digs in that make a saveable bore un-saveable. I have seen that many times. Usually a guy will use a ridge reamer and take a block that would have cleaned up at .020 or .030 and make it a .060 block that is still not quite clean! Slow and easy is the best advise. It is a lot harder to get into trouble because you took too much time, and were too careful!
Feel free to contact me any time. Sometimes it may take a couple emails to me, I get busy and "think" I am up to date, when I am not!
Tom
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top