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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a old 1981 wing that I worked and worked on. First big bike i ever had and I love it. Rode it last year for a bit while working on it but after setting all winter I got it out and after about 3 miles it started smoking heavily out of the left pipe. It has alot of miles and I'm sure it was never taken care of so I'm wondering what would be the best route. Either have motor pulled and rebuilt along with doing carbs and a new clutch or take a chance and try and buy a used motor. I have no idea what this could cost me so any estimates would help. I hate to scrap it since i have so much time in it but i can't afford to go broke fixing it. I will take any advice anyone can give me.
 

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How long did it smoke before you shut it down?
 

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Yes ...how long was it stored for? & if it was on it's side stand, most likely it will go away....the oil seeped by the valve seals for sitting so long on it's side stand.

Mark
 

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Dito what W1ngin1t said..the only thing that bothers me is it took 3 miles to start smoking usually they start smoking at start up and go away after a while .check oil level for one. sea foam could help if you have a sticky ring or valve ..just more info for ya. let us know. what color is the smoke ??white is anti freeze...blue is oil,black is gas. Good luck let us know.ted
 

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Chillax Cheeterslick! You are connected to WingMD. Expect the doctors to show up as they're here and they love a challenge, especially with older Wings.

Yep, the color of the smoke is key. Just like with a human patient, a proper diagnosis requires some facts learned from good questions from the docs. Even if it's burning oil, which, after the comment "after about 3 miles" suggests something like a broken oil ring, dropped valve, or crap blocking air inflow making it run rich - have you checked for mouse nests in the intake system, from the airbox to the carbs? Happens with bikes sitting a long time. The first time we fired off my nu2me '85 1200 Aspy it blew a whole lot of stuff out of the pipes, too.

Helps on the way! Keep the Faith!
 

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is the smoke oil or water
 

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It may very well be the head gasket. I have had this happen on my 82 wing, and lot's of smoke.

Good luck on the fix
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks for all the help

Thanks guys just a little more info. It was stored all winter on the side stand and it smoked lightly when I started it and like i said on the first ride out I went for about 3 miles I smelled oil then looked out my mirror and it was smoking so bad I could not see behind it. It still runs ok but checked compression and it had about 90 pounds in each cylinder which I read was low for a wing. I'm also seeing oil seeping around where exhaust bolts up to head. This bike was abused badly so I can just imagine I probably have a major problem but just can't give up on the old girl. I have come to far with her to let her lay in the garage and fade away. maybe find me another bike that I can get reasonable and start swapping. Just lost right now. Thanks again to all.
 

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Start out with a good tune up. Plugs, filters (air,fuel,oil), fresh oil, drain the old gas and refill with some fresh. If seafoam was added it will smoke like no tomorrow. I fogged my Land Rover with Sea Foam and couldn't see across the shop bay, not to mention set off the fire alarm!
 

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Hmmm, low compression, smokes, and leaks oil. Congratulations, you now have a Harley!

Seriously, it sure sounds like the old girl was "rode hard and hung up wet." Cracked oil ring(s) is what it sounds like. I'd buy a good used engine as the quickest and cheapest fix.
 

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I wouldn't replace it. I would first pull the heads. Check them out, then rebuild them.
I think you will have a better bike if you fix what you have instead of putting a used engine in there.
 

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Any updated news?
 

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New Life -

Hey Cheeter, Goldwings are notorious for being capable of extremely high mileage with few problems. But with an unknown bike, we may be potentially looking at several issues. What kind of mileage are we talking about ? Are you trying to breath life back into a corpse that was long ago flogged to death ? There are lots of older Goldwings around that often require only some basic carb work, a battery, a couple of tires and you’re down the road with a smile on your face.

Test number one would be to warm up the engine - pull the plugs and pour a teaspoon of oil down into each cylinder. Turn the handle bar RUN/KILL Switch to OFF. Then with the key ON, hit the starter and run your compression test while holding the throttle wide open. I usually add jumper cables and a car battery to supplement the bike battery just to make sure I have enough umphffff for reliable numbers. Hold the starter until the compression gauge needle goes no higher. You had mentioned earlier that the compression was about 90 Psi. If the compression significantly improves (A Good Used Engine Typically = 120 - 150 Psi) you probably have some worn cylinders and/or broken piston rings.

The best scenario would be if the piston rings are simply stuck on a couple of the pistons. The rings must be able to move slightly within the piston lands or they can not keep the crankcase oil and the compression separate within the combustion chamber. Sometimes (as others have mentioned) if a Goldwing has been parked on the side stand for an extended period of time the cylinders on the low side may partially fill with oil. This is typically cured with some time spent in the saddle. Also you might drain the carburetors (drain plugs) and run/add a good carb cleaner through the lines while riding it for a while. Perhaps the floats had just stuck a bit after your winter hibernation.

The next possibility could be a blown cylinder head gasket which is actually a fairly easy fix. This could explain the smoke, the low compression and the oil/coolant seepage down the exhaust bolts. You hadn’t mentioned if the low compression issue (cylinder or cylinders) was on the same side.

Although many owners do, you might not have to actually rebuild the heads if you have a head gasket issue. Once the head/heads are removed simply turn them over and use a couple of coffee cans to elevate each end off the table. Fill the combustion chambers of each head with gasoline and watch for any leakage down in the intake or exhaust ports. Any leakage means a head rebuild, valve job, new valves, head swap, etc…. Inspect the interior surface of the cylinder walls for any sign of damage. There should be no scratches or wear lines that you can catch/feel with a finger nail. If there are major issues - With the cost of parts and labor, at this point a good used engine may be the best option. Please keep us posted.....

Good Luck, Michael :)
 
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