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i bought bike yesterday and did a compression test i think i did it wrong in the clymer book it says to hold throttle open doing the compression test i didnt the numbers were ....165.....160.....160.....165.....180....160 is the 180 out of range or is it okay also the clymer book says standard for goldwing is 180 to 240 also i did one plug at a time i didnt remove all plugs then do compression thanks for answering question
 

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... Howdy ... I Started Out With A Clymers For My 85 Ltd. And After It Cost Me Over $100. From Bad Info. ... Now I Only Use The "Honda" Service/repair Manuals ... I Never Heard About Holding The Throttle Open While Doing A Comp. Test ... Happy Trails ...
 

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compression test 1994 goldwing 1500

thanks for info on book but how about the compression numbers 165...160...165....180....160....165..thanks again
 

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Remove all the plugs then hold the throttle open (that way it doesnt have to try to pull air around the throttleblades.) Your fine as far as compression the way you did it. The most important thing is it was pretty consistant. With alll the plgs out and throttle open it will spin faster take in more air and give you a better reading and most important be cconsistant as far as engine speed while doing the test. BTW I wouldnt hit a Hog in the behind with a clymer manual.
 

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thanks for info i sent you another question thanks for answering
Just remember that the compression while the engine is warm will be a bit higher as well. Cold compression is always lower because the pistions and rings havent reached full expansion. Crank the engine for about 5 seconds per cylinder
 

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Here is some compression test steps I found on VW Technical FAQ

Note step 2) I think this might be important in protecting your ignition system, I believe it is in my Haynes manual but I can't verify it as I loaned out my manual. From my 2003 Honda Shadow manual: "To prevent damage to the ingition system form excessive resistance or the possibility of fuel vapor being ignited - - - ground them - - -."

A: There are different ways to check engine compressions, and they can reveal
specific internal defects.
General procedure:
1) Remove all spark plugs.
2) Ground center spark plug wire AWAY from the cylinders
3) Make sure you have a healthy battery & the car is at operating temp.
4) Attach compression gauge on cylinder 1
5) Put car in neutral & have friend push in clutch & accelerator
6) Have friend crank engine, note FIRST reading and reading after
pressure stabilizes (3-5 cranks).
7) Note down readings and repeat for all cylinders
8) A healthy engine should have all readings near mfr's spec, and should
be about +/- 10% of each other. If not...you are in trouble.
9) If one or more is low, but not adjacent cylinders (e.g. 1 & 3)
suspect either a burned valve or worn rings. If adjacent cylinders are
low, also suspect a bad head gasket or a warped head.
10) To determine whether it's rings or valve, do a leak down test => Add
a couple spoon fulls of regular engine oil to the engine through the
spark plug hole of the offending cylinder
11) Repeat measurement. If it remains low => Valve/Head, else if the
readings jumped up => Rings.
12) To distinguish between head vs valves => see a professional. They'll
lock the drive shaft, put air pressure on the cylinders and watch for
bubbles in the coolant fluid.
13) Also the first reading and the final readings should not be too far
apart.
 

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Really good info from Carl334
Comp tests were only invented because computers were still 80 years away and the primary function was to see if the paper and pen calcs done in the design where right when the engine was built ie- to see that comp was not to high v starting load. And are still best used today after a head shave for the same purpose. On a moderate milage motor comp test is good for the checks as per Carl334 post but if a motor really worn it's a waste of time and will give false reading as there will be so much oil trapped between oil and 2nd rings that every test will be a leak down test exept it wont "leak down" ie- with a leak down test comp will fall duing the test if there is a leak. But with really stuffed rings oil will keep pumping into the rings and give good readings. Best thing mate is to check the oil and ride it and ride it and keep riding it and keep checking the oil level and if she don't use more than 100ml per 1000 miles pat yourself on the back for finding a good bike :)
 
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